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CITY OF SOMERVILLE 



MASSACHUSETTS 



Annual Reports 



1 90s 



With Mayor's Inaugural Address 
Delivered Jan. i, 1906 




SOMERVILLE JOURNAL PRINT 
1906 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS 



DELIVERED BY 



MAYOR CHARLES A. GRIMIVIONS 
MONDAY, JANUARY i, 1906 



Gentlemen of the Board of Aldermen: — ' 

On this, the first morning of the new year^ I extend to you 
and to all of the citizens of Somerville my best wishes for a happy 
and prosperous twelvemonth. Our prosperity as a community 
is to a great extent in our hands, for the problem of the city's 
prosperity has now been entrusted to us. 

The return of so many of the old aldermen is a valuable 
asset, indeed, to the new city government. 

The total funded debt of the city January 1, 1905, was 
$1,498,500. This debt was increased during the year $148,000. 
It was decreased $136,500, leaving the net funded debt January 
1, 1906, $1,510,000, a net increase of $11,500. 

The total amount of taxable property is $59,233,000, of 
which $53,392,000 is real estate, and $5,841,000 is personal es- 
tate, including non-resident bank shares. At a rate of $18.30 on 
each $1,000 of valuation, the tax is $1,083,963.90. There are 
19,258 pohs at $2.00, making $38,516. We received from street 
watering $21,520.24, making the total tax levy $1,144,000.14. 
The total number of persons assessed, resident and non-resident, 
was 26,567. 

Of the amount received in taxes, $206,659 is required for 
the debt provisions; $185,400.90 are state and county taxes, 
metropolitan sewer, etc., matters over which the city has no con- 
trol ; $354,300 is used for current expenses of departmeints, over 
which the board of aldermen has no control; $337,604 is the 



4 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

amount for current expenses within control of the board of 
aldermen. The same statement, based upon the $18.30 per thou- 
sand, is as follows : Of each $18.30, $3.13 is for state, county, and 
metropolitan taxes; $3.49 for debt requirements; $5.98 for cur- 
rent expenses over which the board of aldermen has no control ; 
$5.70 for current expenses within control of the board of alder- 
men. 

In addition to the amount received from taxes, there was 
available last year the sum of $222,227.88 on water income ac- 
count; we received $31,139.98 from corporation and bank taxes; 
from the clerk of the courts, $4,632.00; from the county treas- 
urer, for dog licenses, $4,105.14; from the state, the street rail- 
way tax, $50,165.40 ; and from the Boston Elevated Railway tax, 
$8,107.66 ; a total of $320,378.06 ; making the total amount avail- 
able from taxes and from other sources, $1,464,378.20. 

Funded Debt. — The funded debt of the city January 1, 1905, 
was as follows : — 



Funded Debt, City Loan . . . , 
Funded Debt, Sewer Loan . . . . 
Funded Debt, Paving Loan 
Funded Debt, Water Loan . . . . 
Funded Debt, Metropolitan Park Assess- 
ment Loan 



$1,108,500 00 

217,000 00 

40,000 00 

108,000 00 



25,000 00 



$1,498,500 00 



The debt was increased during the year by appropriations 
made by the board of aldermen as follows : — 

Sewers Construction $30,000 00 

Public Buildings Construction: — 

Addition to Bingham School . . . 1,000 00 

Contagious Disease Hospital . . . 5,000 00 

Dormitory at City Home . . . 1,000 00 

Engine House in Ward Two . . . 3,000 00 

High School Building .... 40,000 00 

Proctor School 10,000 00 

Highways, Construction .... 20,000 00 

Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings, 20,000 00 

Highways, Shade Trees and Tree Guards, 1,400 00 

Sidewalks, Construction .... 16,000 00 

Thorndike-street Subway .... 600 00 



$148,000 00 



' mayor's inaugueal address. 5 

The debt was reduced during the year by maturities as 
follows : — 

Funded Debt, City Loan .... $112,500 00 
Funded Debt, Sewer Loan .... 12,000 00 
Funded Debt, Paving Loan . . . 5,000 00 
Funded Debt, Water Loan .... 6,000 00 
Funded Debt, Metropolitan Park Assess- 
ment Loan 1,000 00 



$136,500 00 



Leaving the funded debt of the city January 1, 1906, $1,510,- 
000 (an increase of $11,500 from the previous year), classified as 
follows : — 

City Loan bonds bearing interest at 3^ 

per cent $397,000 00 

City Loan bonds bearing interest at 4 

per cent. 717,000 00 

City Loan Sewer bonds bearing interest 

at 31/2 per cent 78,000 00 

City Loan Sewer bonds bearing interest 

at 4 per cent 151,000 00 

City Loan Sewer bonds bearing interest 

at 4l^ per cent 6,000 00 

City Loan Paving bonds bearing interest 

at 4 per cent 35,000 00 

City Loan bonds bearing interest at 4 

per cent 92,000 00 

Water Loan bonds bearing interest at 5^ 

per cent 10,000 00 

Metropolitan Park Assessment Loan 

bonds bearing interest at SV2 per cent., 24,000 00 



Total Funded Debt January 1, 1906 . $1,510,000 00 

The foregoing amount represents the net indebtedness of the 
city, the unfunded liabilities for the temporary loans, etc., being 
equaled by its assets, which consist of uncollected taxes, sewer 
and sidewalk assessments, etc. 

Taxes. — The assessors' warrant for the tax levy assessed 
upon the polls and estates of the inhabitants, as of May 1, 1905, 
was duly submitted to the collector. 

The total amount of taxable property was $59,233,000, and 
the rate established was $18,30 on each $1,000 valuation, as 
follows :— ^ 



ANNUAL KEPOKTS. 

Real estate, valuation . . . . . $53,392,000 00 
Personal estate, valuation .... 5,754,600 00 
Non-resident bank shares .... 86,400 00 



Total valuation $59,233,000 00 

At a rate of $18.30 on each $1,000 valua- 
tion 1,083,963 90 

Polls, 19,258 at $2 . . . . 38,516 00 

Street watering .... 21,520 24 



Total amount of tax levy . . . $1,144,000 14 
Total number of persons assessed, 
resident and non-resident, 26,567. 

Appropriations. — The , amount of revenue provided by the 
tax levy may properly be classified as follows : — 

Rates 
assessed 
on $1,000 
valuation. Amount. 

For current expenses within the 

control of the board of 

aldermen . . . . $5 70 $337,604 00 

Current expenses of depart- 
ments over which the 
board of aldermen has 
no control . . . . 5 98 354,300 00 

Debt requirements . . . 3 49 206,659 00 

State and county taxes, met- 
ropolitan sewer and park 
assessments, national bank 
tax, and Overlay account, 3 13 185,400 90 



For total amount on a valuation of 

$59,233,000 at $18.30 . . . $1,083,963 90 

Poll taxes assessed, credited to state and 

county 38,516 00 

Street watering, in excess of amount ap- 
propriated 21,520 24 



Total amount of tax levy . . . $1,144,000 14 

The appropriations to the various accounts were as fol- 
lows : — 

ACCOUNTS WITHIN THE CONTROL OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN- 

Assessors . . ... . . $10,000 00 

City Auditor 725 00 . 

Amount carried forward .... $10,725 00 



mayor's inaugural address. 



Amount brought forward 

City Clerk 

City Engineer 

City Messenger 

City Solicitor 

City Treasurer 

Clerk of Committees and Departments 

Contingent Fund 

Election Expenses: — 

City Clerk 

Commissioner of Public Buildings 

Pay of Election OfHcers 

Registrars of Voters . 
Electrical Department 
Excess and Deficiency 
Executive Department .... 

Fire Department 

Highways: — 

Maintenance .... 

Removing Brown-tail Moths 
Inspection of Buildings 

Military Aid 

Police 

Printing and Stationery 

Public Buildings Maintenance: — 

City Hall 

City Hall Annex . ... 

Fire Department .... 

Health Department 

Highways 

Janitors' Salaries .... 

Police 

Public Grounds .... 

Public Library .... 

Schoolhouses \ . . . 

Sewer Department 

Support of Poor .... 

Water Department 

Public Grounds 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Sidewalks Maintenance 

Soldiers' Relief 

Somerville Hospital .... 
Street Lights 



Total amount assessed on a valuation 
. of $59,233,000, at $5.70 . 



$10,725 00 


5,500 00 


11,250 00 


2,000 00 


2,250 00 


9,300 00 


3,900 00 


3,000 00 


1,600 00 


750 00 


2,164 00 


1,550 00 


7,000 00 


45,510 00 


3,900 00 


3,535 00 


4,000 00 


3,000 00 


4,050 00 


1,100 00 


39,000 00 


2,000 00 


3,000 00 


450 00 


5,000 00 


345 00 


300 00 


26,000 00 


1,100 00 


100 00 


4,000 00 


25,000 00 


75 00 


800 00 


300 00 


10,500 00 


1,050 00 


3,000 00 


18,500 00 


5,000 00 


66,000 00 


$337,604 00 



8 



ANNUAL EEPOKTS. 



ACCOUNTS OVER WHICH THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN HAS NO CONTROL. 



Health Department 

Public Library 

School Contingent 

School Teachers' Salaries . 

Support of Poor, City Home 

Support of Poor, Miscellaneous 



$39,500 00 
14,500 00 
23,500 00 

260,000 00 

2,800 00 

14,000 00 



Total amount assessed on a valuation 

of $59,233,000, at $5.98 . . . $354,300 00 



ACCOUNTS PROVIDING FOR DEBT REQUIREMENTS. 

Interest . . . . . . . $76,159 00 

Reduction of Funded Debt .... 130,500 00 

Total amount assessed on a valuation 



of $59,233,000, at $3.49 . 



$206,659 00 



PROVIDING FOR STATE AND COUNTY TAXES, ETC. 



State Tax $70,400 00 

Deduct one-half of poll taxes . 19,258 00 

County Tax .... $57,805 88 

Deduct one-half of poll taxes . 19,258 00 



Metropolitan Sewer Assessment 
Metropolitan Park Assessment . 
National Bank Tax 
Overlay and Abatement 
/\rmory Tax . . . . 



Total amount assessed on a valuation 
of $59,233,000, at $3.13 . 



$51,142 00 



38,547 88 
51,853 10 
24,984 80 

1,581 12 
13,377 58 

3,914 42 



$185,400 90 



In addition to the above, the following appropriations were 
made from the various income accounts : — 

From the income of the water works : — 

Water Maintenance .... . $28,028 91 

Water Loan Interest 4,450 00 

Water Works, Abatements on Water 

Charges . . . . . . 518 19 

Water Works Extension .... 16,796 18 

Sewers Maintenance . . ... 12,000 00 

Fire Department 61,465 00 

Amount carried forward .... $123,258 28 



MAYOR S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 

Amount brought forward . . . $123,258 28 

Reduction of Funded Debt . . . 2,408 87 
Reduction of Funded Debt, Water Loan 

Bonds 6,000 00 

Metropolitan Water Assessment . . 90,560 73 



Total . . . . . ' . . $222,227 88 

From the income from the state and county: — 

Police, the amount received from the state 

for corporation taxes .... $25,635 12 

Police, the amount received from the state 

for bank taxes 5,504 86 

Police, the amount received from the clerk 

of the courts for fines, costs, etc. . 4,632 00 

Public Library, the amount received from 

the county for dog licenses . . . 4,105 14 

Highways Maintenance, from Boston Ele- 
vated Railway tax 8,107 66 

Highways Maintenance, from street rail- 
way tax 50,165 40 



Total 

Total from water income and 
state and county . 



from 



$98,150 18 
$320,378 06 



The aggregate appropriations from the tax levy and from 
income were as follows : — 

From tax levy $1,144,000 14 

From income . . . . . . 320,378 06 



$1,464,378 20 



10 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



The following tables, giving a condensed history of the city's 
finances, are herewith presented for reference : — 













Tax Rate 












per $1,000 






Amount 


Increase 


Reduction 


Valuation 




Ybar. 


of 


of 


of 


on Account 






Funded 


Funded 


Funded 


of Reduc- 






Debt. 


Debt. 


Debt. 


tion of 
Funded 
Debt. 


Town . 





$593,349 


. 


• • 




Dec. 31 


, 1872 . . 








643,354 


$50,005 


. , 




K 


1873 . . 








809,354 


166,000 


. . 




U 


1874 . . 








1,419,854 


610,500 


. 




(( 


1875 . . 








1,571,854 


152,000 


. 




l( 


1876 . . 








1,606,854 


45,000 


♦$55,130 62 


$2 07 


(i 


1877 . . 








1,606,854 


10,000 


*58,828 58 


2 30 


(( 


1878 . . 








1,596,854 


. 


61,004 64 


2 91 


l( 


1879 . . 








1,585,000 








64,915 76 


3 42 


t( 


1880 . . 








1,585,000 








55,739 35 


2 72 


(( 


1881 . . 








1,585,000 








58,498 64 


2 59 


(I 


1882 . . 








1,585,000 








61,390 59 


2 65 


l< 


1883 . . 








1,585,000 








64,479 01 


2 70 


U 


1884 . . 








1,585,000 








67,719 33 


2 78 


<l 


1885 . . 








tl, 525,000 








71,305 66 


2 87 


i( 


1886 . . 








1,525,000 








66,894 23 


2 57 


11 


1887 . . 








1,525,000 








70,252 88 


2 56 


<c 


1888 . . 








t860,500 


25,000 


37,000 00 


1 28 


tl 


1889 . . 








952,500 


130,000 


38,000 00 


1 27 


(( 


1890 . . 








1,057,500 


150,000 


45,000 00 


1 38 


(( 


1891 . . 








1,045,500 


45,000 


57,000 00 


1 55 


(i 


1892 . . 








1,194,500 


253,000 


104,000 00 


2 73 


<( 


1893 . . 








1,279,500 


222,000 


137,000 00 


3 27 


l( 


1894 . . 








1,344,500 


172,000 


107,000 00 


2 42 


(I 


1895 . . 








1,506,500 


247,000 


85,000 00 


1 83 


(( 


1896 . . 








1,531,000 


177,000 


152,500 00 


3 11 


(I 


1897 . . 








1,548,000 


167,000 


150,000 00 


2 39 


(( 


1898 . . 








1,552,000 


176,000 


172,000 00 


3 99 


(( 


1899 . . 








1,492,500 


110,000 


169,500 00 


3 30 


(( 


1900 . . 








1,478,000 


152,000 


166,500 00 


3 17 


(( 


1901 . . 








1,461,000 


146,000 


163,000 00 


3 02 


(I 


1902 . 








1,477,000 


175,000 


159,000 00 


2 86 


(( 


1903 . . 








1,505,500 


197,500 


169,000 00 


2 96 


l( 


um . 








1,498.500 


132,500 


139,500 00 


2 40 


t( 


1905 . 


• 


• 


•• 


1,510,000 


148,000 


136,500 00 


2 30 



*|10,030.00 applied to payment of bonds ; balance to sinking funds. 
tSinking fund applied. 



MAYOR S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



11 



Year. 

1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1839 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 



Valuation. 

$22,755,325 
29,643,100 
30,837,700 
31,317,000 
26,573,400 
25,479,400 
20,976,900 
18,950,100 
20,458,100 
22,569,100 
23,162,200 
23,812,900 
24,331,100 
24,878,400 
26,003,200 
27,471,800 
28,765,400 
30,004,600 
32,557,500 
36,843,400 
38,093,100 
41,873,600 
44,142,900 
46,506,300 
49,070,800 
50,231,000 
50,739,700 
51,262,400 
52,578,200 
53,924,200 
55,558,300 
57,062,000 
58,137,900 
59,233,000 



Tax Levy. 

$274,374 45 

389,214 48 

473,235 50 

518,161 40 

504,475 24 

471,789 14 

409,497 10 

352,553 80 

402,927 71 

452,945 45 

425,721 16 

411,645 43 

418,750 26 

428,605 44 

416,987 28 

424,309 14 

421,458 60 

440,324 40 

447,704 00 

539,137 10 

596,357 50 

675,886 80 

721,165 54 

745,609 02 

786,412 32 

913,574 42 

954,187 11 

882,580 96 

889,916 08 

907,439 82 

964,535 80 

1,038.849 84 

1,059,292 56 

1,144,000 14 



Rate. 

$13 00 
12 80 

15 00 

16 20 
18 60 

18 10 

19 00 

18 00 

19 10 
19 50 

17 80 
16 70 
16 60 

16 60 
15 40 
14 80 
14 00 
14 00 
14 00 

14 00 

15 00 
15 50 
15 70 
15 40 

15 40 

17 30 
17 90 

16 30 
16 00 

15 90 

16 40 

17 20 

17 20 

18 30 



The platform upon which I was elected I adopt as the basis 
of my course of conduct during the year. That platform, in brief, 
is: Proper enforcement of the city charter, economy and effi- 
ciency. • The city is a great business corporation, and it should 
be run on business principles. Everybody connected with the 
city's business must take an interest in it. 

In accordance with the letter and spirit of section 20 of the 
city charter, I assume full responsibility for the acts of every 
head of a department, and shall hold each one responsible for 
the conduct of his own olifice. Heads of departments will not be 
absolved from being personally responsible for the efficiency and 
discipline of those under them. 

.The executive is not disposed to shirk any responsibility, 
and will hold himself directly accountable for the management 
of every department. He will be responsible for the management 
and efficiency of the police department and of the fire depart- 



12 ANNUAL REPOKTS. 

ment, and for the proper sanitary condition of the schoolhouses. 

The mayor's office will in no wise be made an employment 
bureau, but, as provided by the city charter, boards and officers 
will, subject to the approval of the mayor, appoint, employ, and 
discharge, at pleasure, subordinate officers, clerks, assistants, and 
laborers in their respective departments. 

I propose to avail myself of section 22 of the city charter, 
which allows the executive to have the books and accounts of 
the city examined, at his discretion. I confidently expect and 
feel assured that the books will be found* correctly kept, but hope 
the experts will make such suggestions in the line of modern and 
approved methods as will bring them into line with the up-to-date 
system of uniform municipal accounting. This method, I be- 
lieve, will in time be universally adopted, and then all finances, 
officials, and departments will be placed in the lime-light of the 
greatest publicity. Uniform accounts have been adopted by a 
great many municipalities throughout the country, and as the 
basis of schedules of municipal statistics by the United States 
census bureau. Among the many advantages of this system is 
this : It places every citizen in a position to know all costs of 
carrying on the city's business, as well as comparisons with past 
years and with costs in other municipalities. If, as under this 
system, it is possible to compare the expenses of any department 
with those of a corresponding department in a city of similar size, 
it will be a great feature in economy and efficiency, urging de- 
partment heads to reduce their costs and, in competition, to try 
to better the record and each one's value to his own city. Pub- 
licity will always tend to greater economies and greater efficiency. 

Waiving custom and precedent, I do not at this time enter 
into a lengthy consideration of the various departments, simply 
because of my lack of direct personal knowledge of them. Each 
department will, however, have my thoughtful consideration and 
study. The details of the work of the various departments may 
be found in the ''Annual Reports," which will be available to any 
citizen who may call for them at city hall. 

I believe that modern sanitary systems should be installed 
to replace the present systems in the Edgerly and the Bell school- 
houses, and in the older portion of the Bingham schoolhouse. 

All m^aterials of any account should be bought only after 
free, open* and public competition, and the only favorites which 
will be recognized will be quality and price. 



mayor's inaugural address. 13 

I recommend that the usual sum of $5,000 be appropriated 
for the Somerville hospital for the care of the sick poor. I 
would urge the citizens at large to give their continued and in- 
creased support to this beneficent institution and to the asso- 
ciated charities, the Somerville home for the aged, the day 
nursery, and all similar organizations in our city which have for 
their object the amelioration of the sufferings of the poor and dis- 
tressed. 

In this connection, though not as of charity, I would call 
the attention of the public at large to the old soldiers who are 
watched over so carefully in their declining years by our local 
G. A. R. post and its allies. Let those of us who can, lay our 
offerings on the altar of patriotism, that the last days of those 
who gave their best years that the nation might live may be 
passed in peace and comfort. Let us give them what we can, 
but call it not charily, but a patriotic votive offering. 

Death has taken from us during the year just passed two 
notable exemplars of public life. I feel that I should again call 
your remembrance to these two types of the men whom our 
President delights to designate as "high-minded public ser- 
vants.'' George L Vincent, who died early in the year, was the 
friend of every member of the different city governments which 
he served so faithfully and well. The city paid to his memory 
its highest honors, and if man was ever worthy of the ''Well done, 
good and faithful servant," he was. Late in the year died the 
Hon. William H. Hodgkins, who had so greatly honored our 
city by his distinguished services. Serving his country in war 
faithfully and well, he received her high honors and rank. In 
civic life he honored Somerville and was honored by her with 
every position in her power to bestow. As we revere the memo- 
ries of these two types, let us draw an inspiration from their de- 
votion and fidelity to high ideals. 

The city is in a good condition of health, and it affords us 
cause for congratulation that there has been a marked reduction 
m the number of contagious diseases during the past year, as 
compared with the year 1904. 

I wish to accord every meed of prais'e to my immediate 
predecessor in ofifice for his work in the settlement of the Lowell- 
street bridge question and the high school enlargement problem, 
which have perplexed our city governments for some years past. 

The work of grade crossings aboHshment, the preliminaries 



14 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

of which have already been undertaken, should be pushed to 
completion as fast as the course of law will permit. 

• I congratulate Somerville upon the good majority which the 
voters have again given to the cause of no-license, but I regret to 
see that this majority has fallen ofT slightly. A city of homes 
should ever be free from the blight of the saloon. Special atten- 
tion should be given to the matter of granting sixth-class liquor 
licenses, and a strict supervision should be maintained over the 
holders of such Hcenses. There is much complaint, which can 
doubtless be backed up by facts, relative to this class of sales. 
The no-license law will be strictly enforced the coming year, to 
the best of the ability of the executive, with the assistance of the 
police department. 

I shall endeavor to be mayor of the whole people, without 
regard to party, creed, or race ; shall hold heads of departments 
to a strict accountability for the proper conduct of their duties ; 
shall demand 100 cents' worth of value for every dollar ex- 
pended ; and shall remember that every $5,000 spent means ten 
cents in the tax rate. The city will have to live within its means, 
and only so much will be spent as can be done lawfully. 

Three short months ago I had planned to spend the past 
week and to-day in old Rome, and, had Providence so directed 
my footsteps, my greatest delight would have been to ramble 
among and about the precincts of the ancient and classic city. 
Again I should have visited the Coliseum — peaceful, stupendous, 
and fraught with memories worthy of oblivion; possibly again 
the catacombs, from whence, Wallace so well says, ''Christianity 
arose to supersede the Caesars." Again I should have visited 
the Palatine hill, with its ruins of palaces, where lived and died 
the Caesars. Again I should have stood before the marble 
screen where stood the persuasive Paul, as he pleaded with Nero 
for what, eighteen and a quarter centuries later, was to be known 
as a ''square deal" for all mankind. Thence but a few steps to 
the Roman Forum, where are to be seen traces of the central 
milestone from which distances were measured to all parts of the 
known world ; continuing on, the Sacred Way, over which passed 
the magnificent Roman triumphs of the rulers of the pagan 

world. 

But while from all these surroundings emanated so much 
of art, architecture, jurisprudence, and history, to-day they are 
but incidents of travel and study. However, there is one thing 



Mayor^s inaugural address. 15 

that I bring down to-day for a lesson. It is an inscription re- 
peated on many of the ruins of antiquity. Graven in stone, it has 
withstood the ravages of time, decay, and destruction for 2,000 
years. Long ago it was indeHbly impressed on my mind for 
Hfe — four letters only, "S. P. Q'. R.," standing for a Latin in- 
scription, a free translation of which is, ''Senate, People, Ever 
Romans." This, to my mind, is the grandest expression of civic 
pride in history, for in it the old Romans expressed their pride 
in their government, their citizenship, and in the fact that they 
were of Rome. 

So to-day I take from it an inspiration, which I ask you to 
share with me for the whole year. Let us so fulfil our obligations 
and responsibilities, let us so discharge our public duties, that 
the people of Somerville may be proud of their government, 
proud of their citizenship, and proud of the fact that they are of 
Somerville. And to this end we invoke the Divine guidance. 



REPORT OF THE CITY TREASURER AND COLLECTOR 

OF TAXES. 



-Treasurer's Office, January 11, 1906. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen of the 
City of Somerville : — 

Gentlemen: The undersigned presents herewith the thirty- 
fourth annual report of the financial condition of the city, and a 
statement showing, in detail, the receipts and disbursements for 
the year ending December 31, 1905. 

Public Property. 

The value of the public property of the city December 31, 
1904, was $3,826,100.14. The property acquired during the year 
was as follows: — 

School Furniture, Proctor School $1,791 30 

School Books. Proctor School 1,200 00 

Addition to Bingham School 388 11 

Contagious Disease Hospital 4,187 47 

Dormitory at City Home ,. . 1,285 86 

Engine House in Ward Two 1,545 81 

Health Department, Shed 1,189 79 

High School Addition ' 16,537 44 

Historical Building and Observatory on Prospect Hill . 159 89 

Proctor School Building 35,443 96 

Water Works Extension 16,845 95 

$80,575 58 
Less sale of gravel land at Wakefield 5,000 00 

$75,575 58 
Total public property December 31, 1905, $3,901,675.72 

Funded Debt. 

The funded debt December 31, 1904, as per Table B of the 
last annual report, was $1,498,000. 

The debt was increased during the year by appropriations 
as follows: — 

Sewers Construction $30,000 00 

Public Buildings Construction:— 

Addition to Bingham School ...... 1.000 00 

Contagious Disease Hospital ^>^^^ ^^ 

Amount carried forward ' $36,000 00 



EEPORT OF TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 



17 



Amount brought forward . 

Dormitory at City Home . 

Engine House in Ward Two 

High School Building . 

Proctor School 
Highways, Construction , 
Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings 
Highways, Shade Trees and Tree Guards 
Sidewalks Construction .... 
Thorndike-street Subway 



Total amount 
account 



of appropriations on Funded Debt 



$36,000 00 

1,000 00 

3,000 00 

40,000 00 

10,000 00 

20,000 00 

20,000 00 

1,400 00 

16,000 00 

600 00 



$148,000 00 



To provide for the above-mentioned appropriations, bonds 
to the amount of $148,000 at 4 per cent, were issued, viz. : — 



City Loan Bonds Nos. 3310 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3319 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3328 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3337 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3346 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3355 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3364 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3373 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3382 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3390 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3398 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3401 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3404 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3407 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3410 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3413 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3416 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3419 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3422 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3425 
Sewer Loan Bends Nos. 329 



to 3318, payable 1906 
to 3327, payable 1907 
to 3336, payable 1908 
to 3345, payable 1909 
to 3354, payable 1910 
to 3363, payable 1911 
to 3372, payable 1912 
to 3381, payable 1913 
to 3389, payable 1914 
to 3397, payable 1915 
to 3400, payable 1916 
to 3403, payable 1917 
to 3406, payable 1918 
to 3409, payable 1919 
to 3412, payable 1920 
to 3415, payable 1921 
to 3418, payable 1922 
to 3421, payable 1923 
to 3424, payable 1924 
to 3427, payable 1925 
to 358, payable 1906 to 1935 



Total amount of bonds issued in 1905 
The following bonds became due during the } 

City Loan Bonds N 
City Loan Bonds 
City Loan Bonds 



City Loan Bonds Nos. 2294 to 2302, interest 4 per cent. 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 2427 to 2436, interest 4 per cent. 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 2556 to 2563, interest 4 per cent. 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 2674 to 2685, interest 3% per cent. 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 2802 to 2809, interest 3^^ per cent 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 2914 to 2923, interest 3^^ per cent, 
Citv Loan Bonds Nos. 3028 to 3037, interest 4 per cent. 




per cent, 
per cent. 



$9,000 00 
9,000 00 
9,000 00 
9,000 00 
9,000 
9,000 
9,000 
9,000 
8,000 
8,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 



ear 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



30,000 00 
$148,000 00 



Amount carried forward 



$6,000 00 
18,000 00 

8,000 00 

9,000 00 
10,000 00 

8,000 00 
12,000 00 

8,000 00 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 

8,000 00 
500 

3,000 

2,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

$115,500 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



18 



AN:Stxjal RErOETS. 



Amount brought forward 

Sewer Loan Bond No. 227, interest SV2 per cent. 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 256, interest 3^/^ per cent. 
Sewer Loan Bond No, 280, interest 4 per cent. . 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 304, interest 4 per cent, . 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 47, interest 4^/4 per cent. 
Sewer Loan Bonds Nos. 110 to 113, interest 4 per cent. 
Paving Loan Bonds Nos. 61 to 65, interest 4 per cent. 
Water Loan Bond No. b456, interest 4 per cent. 
Water Loan Bonds Nos. 353 to 355, interest 4 per cent. 
Water Loan Bonds Nos. 452 to 453, interest 4 per cent. 
Metropolitan Park Assessment Loan Bond No. 3, interest 
'3V2 per cent 



Total amount of bonds maturing in 1905 



$115,500 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
4,000 00 
5,000 00 
1,000 00 
3,000 00 
2,000 00 

1,000 00 

$136,500 00 



Leaving" the net funded debt December 31, 1905, as per 



Table B, $1,510,000, classified as follows :— 

City Loan Bonds bearing interest at SV2 per cent. 
City Loan Bonds bearing interest at 4 per cent. . 
City Loan Sewer Bonds bearing interest at 3% per cent.. 
City Loan Sewer Bonds bearing interest at 4 per cent. 
City Loan Sewer Bonds bearing interest at 4V2 per cent., 
City Loan Paving Bonds bearing interest at 4 per cent. 
Water Loan Bonds bearing interest at 4 per cent. 
Water Loan Bonds bearing interest at bV2 per cent. . 
Metropolitan Park Assessment Loan Bonds bearing in- 
terest at 3M; per cent 



Total Funded Debt. City Loan . . . $1,114,000 00 

Total Funded Debt, Water Loan . . . 102,000 00 
Total Funded Debt, Paving Loan (outside 

legal limit) 35,000 00 

Total Funded Debt, Sewer Loan . . . 175,000 00 
Total Funded Debt, Sewer Loan (outside 

legal limit) 60,000 00 

Total Funded Debt, Metropolitan Park 

Assessment Loan (outside legal limit), 24,000 00 



$397,000 00 

717,000 00 

78,000 00 

151,000 00 

6,000 00 

35,000 00 

92,000 00 

10,000 00 

24,000 00 

$1,510,000 00 



$1,510,000 00 



Resources. 

The assessors' warrant for the tax levy, assessed upon the 
polls and estates of the inhabitants, was duly received. 

The total amount of taxable property was $59,233,000, and 
the rate of taxation was $18.30 on each $1,000 valuation, as 
follows : — 



Real estate, valuation .... 
Personal estate, valuation . . 
Non-resident bank shares 

Total valuation . . . . 
At a rate of $18.30 on $1,000 valuation . 
Polls, 19,258 at $2 

Amount carried forward 



$53,392,000 00 

5,754,600 00 

86,400 00 

$59,233,000 00 

$1,083,963 90 

38,516 00 

$1,122,479 90 



BEPORT OF TREASURER AN"D COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 19 

Amount brought forward $1,122,479 90 

Street watering 21,520 24 



Total amount of tax levy $1,144,000 14 

Borrowed on Funded Debt account to provide for the 

cost of public improvements and renewals of debt . 148,000 00 

Water works income 222,227 88 

National bank and corporation taxes, applied to Police . 31,139 98 

Court fees, fines, etc., applied to Police .... 4,632 00 
County of Middlesex, dog licenses, applied to Public 

Library 4,105 14 

Street Railway tax for the year 1905, applied to Highways 

Maintenance 50,165 40 

Boston Elevated Railway tax for the year 1905, applied to 

Highways Maintenance 8,107 6G 



Total amount of resources $1,612,378 20 

Appropriations from Funded Debt and from Income. 

Balances unused and in process: — 

CREDIT BALANCES. 

HighAvays Construction ...:.... $20 67 

Highways Maintenance 4,646 56 

Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings .... 304 8() 

Highways, Paving Broadway. Bow and Summer Streets . 15,544 17 

Highways. Thorndike-street Subway 34 47 

Public Buildings Construction: — 

Contagious Disease Hospital ...... 3,012 53 

High School Building 23.462 56 

Luther V. Bell School Fire Escapes 734 81 

Public Library, Isaac Pitman Income Fund, Art . . 84 45 

Public Library, Isaac Pitman Income Fund, Poetry . . 58 39 

Reduction of Funded Debt ' 10,851 39 

Grade, Crossings . . . . 977 30 

Sewers Construction ........ 4,711 52 

Sidewalks Construction 739 75 



$65,183 43 



Cash. 



Balance on hand January 1, 1905 $73,743 56 

Total cash receipts for the year 1905 2,200,176 QQ 

$2,273,920 22 
Total cash disbursements for the year 1905 .... 2,157,436 33 

Balance in the treasury December 31, 1905 . . . ^ . $116,483 89 

Deposits in banks $113,297 62 

Cash on hand 3,186 28 

$116,483 90 

Assets and Liabilities. 

The assets of the city available for the payment of its un- 
funded liabilities are as follows : — 



20 



ANXUAL REPORTS. 



Available assets: — 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Highway Betterment Assessments uncollected, 

Metered Water Charges uncollected 

Real Estate Liens 

Sewer Assessments uncollected . 

Sidewalk Assesi^ments uncollected 

Taxes uncollected 

Cash in treasury .... 



Unfunded liabilities: — 

Coupons unpaid . 
Overplus on Tax Sales 
Redemption of Tax Liens . 
Sundry Persons . 
Excise Tax .... 
Temporary Loans 



$16,111 42 

5,152 78 

19,184 09 

2,258 36 

6,320 99 

3,700 40 

279,452 05 

116,483 89 



$24,540 00 

118 13 

32 97 

524 21 

223 01 

350.000 00 



$448,663 98 



375,438 32 
$73,225 6Q 



Balance Sheet. 

DEBIT. 



Public Property 

Excess of available assets 



CREDIT. 



Excess of appropriations from tax levy 
Excess of appropriations from tax levy, 
Overlay and Abatement .... 
Excess of appropriations from Funded Debt, 
Present Funded Debt 



Property and Debt Balance or Municipal 
Capital 



$3,901,675 72 
73.225 66 



$5,496 14 

2,546 09 

65,183 43 

1,510,000 00 

$1,583,225 66 

2,391,675 72 



$3,974,901 38' 



$3,974,901 38 



A detailed statement of the public property, funded debt, 
and the receipts and disbursements of the several accounts will be 
found in the following appendix. 

Respectfully submitted, 

James F. Beard, 
! Treasurer and Collector of Taxes. 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 21 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT 



TABLE A.— PUBLIC PROPERTY DECEHBER 31, 1905. 

Central Hill land (389,920 feet) $270,000 00 

City Hall $35,332 32 

• Furniture and fixtures .... 10,000 00 

, . ^5 332 32 

Public Library building 42,000 00 

Public Library 25,000 00 

67,000 00 

City Hall Annex 20,655 02 

Albion A. Perry Schoolhouse, Washington 

street, land (46,080 feet) and building . 36,000 00 

Furniture 1,080 00 

Books . _ 530 00 

r 37,610 00 

Bingham Schoolhouse, land (35,586 feet) 

and building 66,285 04 

Furniture 2,600 00 

Books ' 2,300 00 

71,185 04 

Burns Schoolhouse, land (16,080 feet) and 

building 33,300 00 

Furniture 1,460 00 

Books 1,000 00 

35,760 00 

Charles G. Pope Schoolhouse, land (27,236 

feet) and building 78,600 00 

Furniture 2,160 00 

Bool^s 2,600 00 

83,360 00 

Cummings Schoolhouse, land (11,300 feet) 

and building 11,200 00 

Furniture 720 00 

Books 500 00 

12,420 00 

Davis Schoolhouse, land (30,155 feet) and 

building 22,000 00 

Furniture 720 00 

Books 400 00 

23,120 00 

Edgerly Schoolhouse, land (24,000 feet) and 

building 42,000 00 

Furniture 2,230 00 

Books . 2,800 00 

47,030 00 

English High Schoolhouse .... 134,000 00 

Furniture 3,900 00 

Philosophical and manual training ap- 
paratus 8,200 00 

Books 12,000 00 

158,100 00 

Amount carried forward $871,572 38 



22 ANNUAL REPOETS. 

Amount brought forward $871,572 38 

Forster Schoolhouse and Annex, land 

(30,632 feet) and buildings . . . 82,000 00 

Furniture . 3,290 00 

Books 4,100 00 

89,390 00 

George L. Baxter Schoolhouse, land (11,000 

feet) and building 31,800 00 

Furniture 1,155 64 

Books 450 00 

33,405 64 

George O. Proctor Schoolhouse, building 

(on Armory lot) (40,244 feet) . . . 41,029 16 

Furniture 1,791 30 

Books 1,200 00 

44,020 46 

George W. Durell Schoolhouse, land (13,883 

feet) and building 19,000 00 

Furniture 720 00 

Books 500 00 

20,220 00 

-Highland Schoolhouse, land (23,260 feet) 

and building 58,000 00 

Furniture 2,560 00 

Books 2,800 00 

63,360 00 

Jacob T. Glines Schoolhouse, land (28,800 

feet) and building 78,200 00 

Furniture 2,340 00 

Books 2,100 00 

82,640 00 

Latin High Schoolhouse .... 76,537 44 

Furniture 2,000 00 

Philosophical apparatus .... 500 00 

Books 3,300 00 

82,337 44 

Lincoln Schoolhouse, land (17,662 feet) and 

building 17,500 00 

Furniture 720 00 

Books 500 00 

18,720 00 

Luther V. Bell Schoolhouse, land (22,262 

feet) and building 43,000 00 

Furniture 2,400 00 

Books . 2,400 00 

47,800 00 

Martin W. Carr Schoolhouse, land (20,450 

feet) and building 51,000 00 

Furniture 2,800 00 

Books 2,800 00 

56,600 00 

Morse Schoolhouse, land (20,000 feet) and 

building 45,859 00 

Furniture 2,340 00 

Books . 2,800 00 

50,999 00 

Martha Perry Lowe Schoolhouse, land (21,- 

650 feet) and building .... 50,346 16 

Furniture 1,480 00 

Books 800 00 

52,626 16 

Amount carried forward ....... $1,513,691 08 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTORS REPORT. 



23 



Amount brought forward 

O. S. Knapp Schoolhouse, land (24,517 feet) 

and building 48,000 0») 

Furniture 2,540 00 

Books 3,000 00 

Prescott Schoolhouse, land (22,000 feet) and 

building 64,000 00 

Furniture 2,260 00 

Books 2,700 00 



Prospect-hill Schoolhouse, land (23,733 feet) 

and building 

Benjamin G. Brown Schoolhouse, land 
(20,093 feet) and building 

Furniture 

Books 



Sanford Hanscom Schoolhouse, land (12,756 

feet) and building 

Furniture 

Books 

Clark W. Bennett Schoolhouse, land (16,250 

feet) and building 

Furniture 

Books 

William H. Hodgkins Schoolhouse, land 
(35,034 feet) and building 

Furniture 

Books 

City Stables, dwelling houses and 462,623 

ffet of land 

Health Department, shed .... 
Equipments for highway repairs 
Watering carts and sheds .... 



38,400 00 

1,290 16 

700 00 



48,500 00 

1,080 00 

500 00 



57,268 32 
2,180 00- 
1,000 00 



69,300 00 
2,400 00 
2,300 00 



84,000 00 
1,189 79 

21,690 00 
5,000 00 



Water Works, land and buildings (93,500 feet) . 

No. 1 Fire Station, land (8,937 feet) and 

building 33,200 00 

Engine No. 2 and apparatus . . . 4,000 00 

Hose wagon No. 1 and apparatus . . 1,500 00 

Furniture . . . ... . 400 00 



No. 2 Fire Station, land (5,500 feet) and 

building 10,400 00 

Furniture . 400 00 

Hose wagon No 2 and apparatus . . 1,500 00 

No. 3 Fire Station, land (13,700 feet) and 

• building 55,743 18 

Furniture 400 00 

Hose wagon No. 3 and apparatus . . 1,500 00 

Hook and ladder truck and apparatus . 3,400 00 

Engine No. 3 5,375 00 



Amount carried forward 



$1,513,691 08 
53,540 00 

68,960 00 
15,000 00 

40,390 16 

50,080 00 

60,448 32 

74,000 00 



111,879 79 
32,000 00 



39,100 00 



12,300 00 



66,418 18 
$2,137,807 53 



24 ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



Amount brought forward .... 
No. 4 Fire Station, land (9,100 feet) and 
building . . . . 

Furniture 

Engine No. 4 and apparatus 
Combination wagon and apparatus . 

No. 5 Fire Station, land (39,000 feet) and 

building 

Furniture 

Hose wagon No. 5 and apparatus 

No. 6 Fire Station, land (8,113 feet) and 

building 

Furniture 

Apparatus 

Hook and Ladder Station No. 2, land 
(9,903 feet) and building .... 

Furniture 

Apparatus 

Central Fire Station, land (11,738 feet) and 
building .... 
Furniture 

Engine No. 1 and apparatus 
Hose wagon and apparatus 
Two relief hose carriages . 
One relief hook and ladder 
Chemical Engine A and equipment 

Fire Alarm and Police Signal apparatus 
Police Station, land (15,225 feet) and 

building 

Furniture 



. 


$2,137,807 53 


15,500 00 




400 00 




4,000 00 




2,500 00 






22,400 00 




16,500 00 




400 00 




1,500 00 






18,400 00 




17,600 00 




600 00 




4,850 00 






23,050 00 




14,100 00 




1,200 00 




7,500 00 






22,800 00 




36,700 00 




500 00 




4,000 00 




2,000 00 




1,000 00 




400 00 




2,498 53 






47,098 53 
36,610 00 


. 


54,000 00 




3,000 00 





City Home, Broadway, land (421,646 feet) 

and buildings 36,475 64 

Furniture 1,426 09 



Prospect-hill Park (94,508 feet) . . . 67,511 75 

Historical Building and Observatory . . 9,119 55 



57,000 00 



37,901 73 



Contagious Disease Hospital .... 4,187 47 

Land (88,364 feet) 15,600 00 

19,787 47 

Water Works 849,845 95 

Prospect street, land (7,918 feet) and building . . . 6,800 00 

Broadway Park (cost $212,993.20) (700,000 square feet) . 270,000 00 
Nathan Tufts Park (about 4 54-100 acres, 217,572 feet) . 68,000 00 

Lincoln Park, Washington street (288,764 

square fe^t) 63,200 00 

Out-door Gymnasium 800 00 



64,000 00 



76,631 30 



Franklin Park (40,000 feet) 12,000 00 

Powder-House Boulevard (200,618 square feet) and 

building 22,500 00 

Amount carried forward • $3,792,632 51 



APPENDIX TO TEEASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 25 



Amount brought forward . 
Joy street, land (2,700 feet) . 
Broadway, land (10,890 feet) . 
College avenue, land (18,000 feet) . 
Webster avenue, land (10,000 feet) 
Holland street, land (217,800 feet) . 
Gravel land in Waltham (about 35 acres) 
Rifle Range, building .... 



Gravel land rear North street (199,043 feet) 
Oliver street, land (40,500 feet) 
Whipple street, land (15,240 feet) . 
Beacon street, land (10,000 feet) 
Passageway on Putnam street (1,135 feet) . 
Stand Pipe lot (17.176 feet) .... 
Glen street, land (6,370 feet) .... 
Somerville avenue, land (305 feet) . 
Broadway, junction Main street, land (1,260 feet) 
Joy-street playground (20,000 feet) 

Total amount of public property , 









$3,792,632 51 








500 00 








2,300 00 








6,000 00 








2,500 00 








35,500 00 


* 15,000 0( 


) 


693 


2] 


L 

15,693 21 

4,000 00 






, . 






18,000 00 


, 






3,000 00 


, , 






2,800 00 


. 






400 00 


• 






5.100 00 

2,300 00 

300 00 


;et) 






900 00 


• 






9,750 00 


, . 


$3,901,675 72 



26 



ANNUAL REPOETS. 



TABLE B.— FUNDED DEBT DECEMBER 31, 1905. 
City Loan Bonds. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When Due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 


April 1, 1905 


3,310 to 3,318 


31/2 


Apr. 1, 1906 


$1,000 


$9,000 


July 1, 1894 


1,680 to 1,685 


4 


July 1, 1906 


1,000 


6,000 


July 1, 1895 


1,918 to 1,932 


4 


July 1, 1906 


1,000 


15,000 


July 1, 1896 


2,140 to 2,147 


4 


July 1, 1906 


1,000 


8,000 


July 1, 1897 


2,303 to 2,311 


4 


July 1, 1906 


1,000 


9,000 


July 1, 1898 


2,437 to 2,446 


4 


July 1, 1906 


1,000 


10,000 


July 1, 1899 


2,564 to 2,570 


4 


July 1, 1906 


1,000 


7,000 


July 2, 1900 


2,686 to 2,695 


31/2 


July 1, 1906 


1,000 


10,000 


July 1, 1901 


2,810 to 2,817 


31/2 


July 1, 1906 


1,000 


8,000 


July 1, 1902 


2,924 to 2,933 


31/2 


July 1, 1906 


1,000 


10,000 


July 1, 1903 


3,038 to 3,046 


4 


July 1, 1906 


1,000 


9,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,199 to 3,206 


4 


July 1, 1906 


1,000 


8,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,207 


4 


July 1, 1906 


500 


500 


October 1, 1903 


3,154 to 3,155 


4 


Oct. 1, 1906 


1,000 


2,000 


April 1, 1905 


3,319 to 3,327 


31/2 


Apr. 1, 1907 


1,000 


9,000 


July 1, 1894 


1,686 to 1,691 


4 


July 1, 1907 


1,000 


6,000 


July 1, 1895 


1,933 to 1,947 


4 


July 1, 1907 


1,000 


15,000 


July 1, 1896 


2,148 to 2,155 


4 


July 1, 1907 


1,000 


8,000 


July 1, 1897 


2,312 to 2,320 


4 


July 1, 1907 


1,000 


9,000 


July 1, 1898 


2,447 to 2,456 


4 


July 1, 1907 


1,000 


10,000 


July 1, 1899 


2,571 to 2,577 


4 


July 1, 1907 


1,000 


7,000 


July 2, 1900 


2,696 to 2,705 


31/2 


July 1, 1907 


1,000 


10,000 


July 1, 1901 


2,818 to 2,825 


31/2 


July 1, 1907 


1,000 


8,000 


July 1, 1902 


2,934 to 2,942 


31/2 


July 1, 1907 


1,000 


9,000 


July 1, 1903 


3,047 to 3,055 


4 


July 1, 1907 


1,000 


9.000 


July 1, 1904 


3,208 to 3,215 


4 


July 1, 1907 


1,000 


8,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,216 


4 


July 1, 1907 


500 


500 


October 1, 1903 


3,156 to 3,157 


4 


Oct. 1, 1907 


1,000 


2,000 


April 1, 1905 


3,328 to 3,336 
Amount 


31/2 
carried 


Apr. 1,1908 
forward . . 


1,000 


9,000 




$231,000 



APPENDIX TO TEEASUREK AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 27 



CITY LOAN BONDS.— Continued. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 






Amount 


brought 


forward . . 


.... 


$231,000 


July 1, 


1894 


1,692 to 1,697 


4 


July 1, 1908 


$1,000 


6,000 


July 1, 


1895 


1,948 to 1,962 


4 


July 1, 1908 


1,000 


15,000 


July 1, 


1896 


2,156 to 2,163 


4 


July 1, 1908 


1,000 


8,000 


July 1, 


1897 


2,321 to 2,325 


4 


July 1, 1908 


1,000 


5,000 


July 1, 


1898 


2,457 to 2,465 


4 


July 1, 1908 


1,000 


9,000 


July 1, 


1899 


2,578 to 2,584 


4 


July 1, 1908 


1,000 


7,000 


July 2, 


1900 


2,706 to 2,715 


31/2 


July 1, 1908 


1,000 


10,000 


July 1, 


1901 


2,826 to 2,832 


31/2 


July 1, 1908 


1,000 


7,000 


July 1, 


1902 


2,943 to 2,951 


31/2 


July 1, 1908 


1,000 


9,0-00 


July 1, 


1903 


3,056 to 3,064 


4 


July 1, 1908 


1,000 


9,000 


July 1, 


1904 


3,217 to 3,224 


4 


July 1, 1908 


1,000 


8,000 


July 1, 


1904 


3,225 


4 


July 1, 1908 


500 


500 


Octob 


er 1, 1903 


3,158 to 3,159 


4 


Oct. 1, 1908 


1,000 


2,000 


April 1 


, 1905 


3,337 to 3,345 


31/2 


Apr. 1, 1909 


1,000 


9,000 


July 1, 


1894 


1,698 to 1,703 


4 


July 1, 1909 


1,000 


6,000 


July 1, 


1895 


1,963 to 1,976 


4 


July 1, 1909 


1,000 


14,000 


July 1, 


1896 


2,164 to 2,171 


4 


July 1, 1909 


1,000 


8,000 


July 1, 


1897 


2,326 to 2,330 


4 


July 1, 1909 


1,000 


5,000 


July 1, 


1898 


2,466 to 2,470 


4 


July 1, 1909 


1,000 


5,000 


July 1, 


1899 


2,585 to -2,591 


4 


July 1, 1909 


1,000 


7,000 


July 2, 


1900 


2,716 to 2,725 


31/2 


July 1, 1909 


1,000 


10,000 


July 1, 


1901 


2,833 to 2,839 


3Va 


July 1, 1909 


1,000 


7,000 


July 1, 


1902 


2,952 to 2,960 


31/2 


July 1, 1909 


1,000 


9,000 


July 1, 


1903 


3,065 to 3,073 


4 


July 1, 1909 


1,000 


9,000 


July 1, 


1904 


3,226 to 3,233 


4 


July 1, 1909 


1,000 


8,000 


July 1, 


1904 


3,234 


4 


July 1, 1909 


500 


500 


Octob( 


IT 1, 1903 


3,160 to 3,161 


4 


Oct. 1, 1909 


1,000 


2,000 


April 1 


, 1905 


3,346 to 3,354 


31/2 


Apr. 1,1910 


1,000 


9,000 


July 1, 


1894 


1,704 to 1,709 


4 


July 1, 1910 


1,000 


6,000 






Amount 


carried 


forward . . 


.... 


$441,000 



28 



ANNUAL REPORTS, 



CITY LOAN BONDS. — Continued. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 




Amount 


brought 


forward . . 


• • • • 


$441,000 


July 1, 1895 


1,977 to 1,990 


4 


July 1, 1910 


$1,000 


14,000 


July 1, 1896 


2,172 to 2,179 


4 


July 1, 1910 


1,000 


8,000 


July 1, 1897 


2,331 to 2,335 


4 


July 1, 1910 


1,000 


5,000 


July 1, 1898 


2,471 to 2,475 


4 


July 1, 1910 


1,000 


5,000 


July 1, 1899 


2,592 to 2,595 


4 


July 1, 1910 


1,000 


4,000 


July 2, 1900 


2,726 to 2,735 


ZV2 


July 1, 1910 


1,000 


10,000 


July 1, 1901 


■2,840 to 2,846 


31/2 


July 1, 1910 


1,000 


7,000 


July 1, 1902 


2,961 to 2,969 


31/2 


July 1, 1910 


1,000 


9,000 


July 1, 1903 


3,074 to 3,082 


4 


July 1, 1910 


1,000 


9,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,235 to 3,239 


4 


July 1, 1910 


1,000 


5,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,240 


4 


July 1, 1910 


500 


500 


July 1, 1904 


3,241 to 3,242 


4 


July 1, 1910 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,243 


4 


July 1, 1910 


500 


500 


October 1, 1903 


3,162 to 3,163 


4 


Oct. 1, 1910 


1,000 


2,000 


April 1, 1905 


3,355 to 3,363 


31/2 


Apr. 1,1911 


1,000 


9,000 


July 1, 1894 


1,710 to 1,715 


4 


July 1, 1911 


1,000 


6,000 


July 1, 1895 


1,991 to 2,004 


4 


July 1, 1911 


1,000 


14,000 


July 1, 1S96 


2,180 to 2,187 


4 


July 1, 1911 


1,000 


8,000 


July 1, 1897 


2,336 to 2,340 


4 


July 1, 1911 


1,000 


5,000 


July 1, 1898 


2,476 to 2,480 


4 


July 1, 1911 


1,000 


5,000 


July 1, 1899 


2,596 to 2,599 


4 


July 1, 1911 


1,000 


4,000 


July 2, 1900 


2,736 to 2,740 


31/3 


July 1, 1911 


1,000 


5,000 


July 1, 1901 


2,847 to 2,853 


31/2 


July 1, 1911 


1,000 


7,000 


July 1, 1902 


2,970 to 2,978 


31/2 


July 1, 1911 


1,000 


9,000 


July 1, 1903 


3,083 to 3,091 


4 


July 1, 1911 


1,000 


9,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,244 to 3,248 


4 


July 1,1911 


1,000 


5,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,249 


4 


July 1, 1911 


500 


500 


July 1, 1904 


3,250 to 3,251 


4 


July 1,1911 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,252 


4 


July 1, 1911 


500 


500 


October 1, 1903 


3,164 to 3,165 


4 


Oct. 1, 1911 


1,000 


2,000 




Amount 


carried 


forward . . 


• • • • 


$613,000 



APPENDIX TO TKEASURER AND COLLECTOR'S EEPORT. 29 
CITY LOAN BONDS.—Continued. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 




Amount 


brought 


forward . . 




$613,000 


April 1, 1905 


3,364 to 3,37-2 


31/2 


Apr. 1,1912 


$1,000 


9,000 


July 1, 1894 


1,716 to 1,721 


4 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


6,000 


July 1, 1895 


2,005 to 2,018 


4 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


14,000 


July 1, 1896 


2,188 to 2,194 


4 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


7,000 


July 1, 1897 


2,341 to 2,344 


4 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1898 


2,481 to 2,485 


4 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


5,000 


July 1, 1899 


2,600 to 2,603 


4 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


4,000 


July 2, 1900 


2,741 to 2,745 


3y2 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


5,000 


July 1, 1901 


2,854 to 2,857 


3y2 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1902 


2,979 to 2,987 


ZVz 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


9,000 


July 1, 1903 


3,092 to 3,100 


4 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


9,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,253 to 3,257 


4 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


5,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,258 


4 


July 1, 1912 


500 


500 


July 1, 1904 


3,259 to 3,260 


4 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,261 


4 


July 1, 1912 


500 


500 


October I, 1903 


3,166 to 3,167 


4 


Oct. 1, 1912 


1,000 


2,000 


April 1, 1905 


3,373 to 3,381 


31/2 


Apr. 1,1913 


1,000 


9,000 


July 1, 1894 


1,722 to 1,727 


4 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


6,000 


July 1, 1895 


2,019 to 2,031 


4 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


13,000 


July 1, 1896 


2,195 to 2,201 


4 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


7,000 


July 1, 1897 


2,345 to 2,348 


4 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1898 


2,486 to 2,490 


4 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


5,000 


July 1, 1899 


2,604 to 2,607 


4 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


4,000 


July 2, 1900 


2,746 to 2,749 


3H 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1901 


2,858 to 2,861 


31/2 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1902 


2,988 to 2,990 


31/3 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1903 


3,101 to 3,109 


4 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


9,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,262 to 3,266 


4 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


5,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,267 , 


4 


July 1, 1913 


500 


500 


July 1, 1904 


3,268 to 3,269 


4 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


2,000 




Amount 


carried 


forward . . , 


• • • • 


$774,500 



30 



AN^NUAL EEPOBTS. 



CITY LOAN BONDS.— Continued. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 




Amount 


brought 


forward . . 


.... 


$774,500 


July 1, 1904 


3,270 


4 


July 1. 1913 


$500 


500 


October 1, 1903 


3,168 to 3,169 


4 


Oct. 1, 1913 


1,000 


2,000 


April 1, 1905 


3,382 to 3,389 


3y2 


Apr. 1,1914 


1,000 


8,000 


July 1, 1894 


1,728 to 1,733 


4 


July 1, 1914 


1,000 


6,000 


July 1, 1895 


2,032 to 2,044 


4 


July 1. 1914 


1,000 


13,000 


July 1, 1896 


2,202 to 2,208 


4 


July 1, 1914 


1,000 


7,000 


July 1, 1897 


2,349 to 2,352 


4 


July 1, 1914 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1898 


2,491 to 2,495 


4 


July 1, 1914 


1,000 


5,000 


July 1, 1899 


2,608 to 2,611 


4 


July 1, 1914 


1,000 


4,000 


July 2, 1900 


2,750 to 2,753 


SVa 


July 1, 1914 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1901 


2,862 to 2,865 


3y2 


July 1, 1914 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1902 


2,991 to 2,993 


31/2 


July 1, 1914 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1903 


3.110 to 3,113 


4 


July 1,1914 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,271 to 3,275 


4 


July 1, 1914 


1,000 


5,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,276 


4 


July 1, 1914 


500 


500 


July 1, 1904 


3,277 to 3,278 


4 


July 1, 1914 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,279 


4 


July 1, 1914 


500 


500 


October 1, 1903 


3,170 to 3,171 


4 


Oct. 1, 1914 


1,000 


2,000 


April 1, 1905 


3,390 to 3,397 


8y2 


Apr. 1,1915 


1,000 


8.000 


July 1, 1895 


2,045 to 2,057 


4 


July 1, 1915 


1,000 


13,000 


July 1, 1896 


2,209 to 2,215 


4 


July 1, 1915 


1,000 


7,000 


July 1, 1897 


2,353 to 2,356 


4 


July 1, 1915 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1898 


2,496 to 2,500 


4 


July 1, 1915 


1,000 


5,000 


July 1, 1899 


2,612 to 2,614 


4 


July 1, 1915 


1,000 


3,000 


July 2, 1900 


2,754 to 2,757 


3V2 


July 1, 1915 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1901 


2,866 to 2,869 


3y2 


July 1, 1915 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1902 


2,994 to 2,996 


3y2 


July 1, 1915 


1,00'> 


3,000 


July 1, 1903 


3,114 to 3,117 


4 


July 1, 1915 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,280 to 3,281 


4 


July 1, 1915 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,282 
Amount 


4 

carried 


July 1, 1915 
forward . . 


500 


500 




$906,500 



APPENDIX TO TREASUEER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



31 



CITY LOAN BONDS.— Continued. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 




Amount 


brought 


forward . . 




$906,500 


October 1, 1903 


3,172 to 3,173 


4 


Oct. 1, 1915 


$1,000 


2,000 


April 1, 1905 


3,398 to 3,400 


31/2 


Apr. 1,1916 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1896 


2,216 to 2,222 


4 


July 1, 1916 


1,000 


7,000 


July 1, 1897 


2,357 to 2,360 


4 


July 1, 1916 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1898 


2,501 to 2,505 


4 


July 1, 1916 


1,000 


5,000 


July 1, 1899 


2,615 to 2,617 


4 


July 1,1916 


1,000 


3,000 


July 2, 1900 


2,758 to 2,761 


31/2 


July 1, 1916 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1901 


2,870 to 2,873 


31/2 


July 1, 1916 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1902 


2,997 to 2,999 


31/2 


July 1, 1916 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1903 


3,118 to 3,121 


4 


July 1, 1916 


1,000 


4,000 


" July 1, 1904 


3,283 to 3,284 


4 


July 1, 1916 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,285 


4 


July 1, 1916 


500 


500 


October 1, 1903 


3,174 to 3,175 


4 


Oct. 1, 1916 


1,000 


2,000 


April 1, 1905 


3,401 to 3,403 


31/2 


Apr. 1,1917 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1897 


2,361 to 2,364 


4 


July 1, 1917 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1898 


2,506 to 2,510 


4 


July 1, 1917 


1,000 


5,000 


July 1, 1899 


2,618 to 2,620 


4 


July 1, 1917 


1,000 


3,000 


July 2, 1900 


2,762 to 2,765 


31/2 


July 1, 1917 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1901 


2,874 to 2,877 


31/2 


July 1, 1917 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1902 


3,000 to 3,002 


3y2 


July 1, 1917 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1903 


3,122 to 3,125 


4 


July 1, 1917 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1904 


3.286 to 3,287 


4 


July 1, 1917 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,288 


4 


July 1, 1917 


500 


500 


October 1, 1903 


3,176 to 3,177 


4 


Oct. 1, 1917 


1,000 


2,000 


April 1, 1905 


3,404 to 3,406 


31/2 


Apr. 1,1918 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1898 


2,511 to 2,515 


4 


July 1, 1918' 


1,000 


5,000 


July 1, 1899 


2,621 to 2,623 


4 


July 1, 1918 


1,000 


3,000 


July 2, 1900 


2,766 to 2,769 


31/2 


July 1, 1918 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1901 


2,878 to 2,881 


31/2 


July 1, 1918 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1902 


3,003 to 3,005 
Amount 


31/2 

carried 


July 1, 1918 
forward . . 


1,000 

. . . . .^ 


3,000 




M.006,500 



33 


ANNUAL REPORTS. 
CITY LOAN BONDS.-Continued. 






DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 




Amount 


brought 


forward . . 


.... 


$1,006,500 


July 1, 1903 


3,126 to 3,129 


4 


July 1, 1918 


$1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,289 to 3,290 


4 


July 1, 1918 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,291 


4 

i 


July 1, 1918 


500 


500 


October 1, 1903 


3,178 to 3,179 


4 


Oct. 1, 1918 


1,000 


2,000 


April 1, 1905 


3,407 to 3,409 


31/2 


Apr. 1,1919 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1899 


2,624 to 2,625 


4 


July 1, 1919 


1,000 


2,000 


July 2, 1900 


2,770 to 2,773 


31/2 


July 1, 1919 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1901 


2,882 to 2,885 


3y2 


July 1, 1919 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1902 


3,006 to 3.008 


3y2 


July 1, 1919 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1903 


3,130 to 3,133 


4 


July 1, 1919 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,292 to 3,293 


4 


July 1, 1919 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,294 


4 


July 1, 1919 


500 


500 


October 1, 1903 


3,180 to 3,181 


4 


Oct. 1, 1919 


1,000 


2,000 


April 1, 1905 


3,410 to 3,412 


3y2 


Apr. 1,1920 


1,000 


3,000 


July 2, 1900 


2,774 to 2,777 


3y2 


July 1, 1920 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1901 


2,886 to 2,889 


3y2 


July 1, 1920 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1902 


3,009 to 3,011 


3y2 


July 1, 1920 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1903 


3,134 to 3,137 


4 


July 1, 1920 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,295 to 3,296 


4 


July 1, 1920 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,297 


4 


July 1, 1920 


500 


500 


October 1, 1903 


3,182 to 3,183 


4 


Oct. 1, 1920 


1,000 


2,000 


April 1, 1905 


3,413 to 3,415 


3y2 


Apr. 1, 1921 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1901 


2,890 to 2,893 


3y2 


July 1, 1921 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1901 


3,012 to 3,014 


3^ 


July 1, 1921 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1903 


3,138 to 3,141 


4 


July 1, 1921 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,298 to 3,299 


4 


July 1, 1921 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,300 


4 


July 1, 1921 


500 


500 


October 1, 1903 


3,184 to 3,185 


4 


Oct. 1, 1921 


1,000 


2,000 


April 1, 1905 


3,416 to 3,418 


3y2 


Apr. 1,1922 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1901 


3,015 to 3,016 


3y2 


July 1, 1922 


1,000 


2,000 




Amount 


carried 


forward . . 


.... 


$1,085,500 



APPENDIX TO TEEASUKER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 33 



CITY LOAN BONDS.— Concluded. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 




Amount 


brought 


forward . . 


• > • • 


$1,085,500 


July 1, 1903 


3,142 to 3,145 


4 


July 1, 1922 


$1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,301 to 3,302 


4 


July 1, 1922 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,303 


4 


July 1, 1922 


500 


500 


October 1, 1903 


3,186 to 3,187 


4 


Oct. 1, 1922 


1,000 


2,000 


April 1, 1905 


3,419 to 3,421 


3y2 


Apr. 1, 1923 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1903 


3,146 to 3,149 


4 


July 1, 1923 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,304 to 3,305 


4 


July 1, 1923 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,306 


4 


July 1, 1923 


500 


500 


October 1. 1903 


3,188 to 3,189 


4 


Oct. 1, 1923 


1,000 


2,000 


April 1, 1905 


3,422 to 3,424 


3y2 


Apr. 1,1924 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,307 to 3,308 


4 


July 1, 1924 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1904 


3,309 


4 


July 1, 1924 


500 


500 


April 1, 1905 


3,425 to 3,427 
Total amount 


31/2 
of City 


Apr. 1,1925 
Loan Bonds 


1,000 

• • • • 


3,000 




$1,114,000 



34 



A^^XUAL EEPOETS. 



Sewer Loan Bonds. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 

cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 


April 1, 1905 


329 


31/2 


Apr. 1, 1906 


$1,000 


$1,000 


July 1, 1894 


65 


4 


July 1, 1906 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1897 


182 


4 


July 1, 1906 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1898 


206 


4 


July 1, 1906 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1901 


228 


31/2 


July 1, 1906 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1902 


257 


31/2 


July 1, 1906 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1903 


281 


4 


July 1, 1906 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1904 


305 


4 


July 1, 1906 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1893 


48 


4V2 


Oct. 1, 1906 


1,000 


1,000 


April 1, 1905 


330 


3y2 


Apr. 1,1907 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1894 


66 


4 


July 1, 1907 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1897 


183 


4 


July 1, 1907 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1898 


207 


4 


July 1, 1907 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1901 


229 


3y2 


July 1, 1907 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1902 


258 


31/2 


July 1, 1907 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1903 


282 


4 


July 1, 1907 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1904 


306 


4 


July 1, 1907 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1893 


49 


4y2 


Oct. 1, 1907 


1,000 


1,000 


April 1, 1905 


001 


3y2 ! 


Apr. 1,1908 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1894, 


67 


4 


July 1, 1908 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1897 


184 


4 


July 1, 1908 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1898 


208 


4 


July 1, 1908 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1901 


230 


3y2 


July 1, 1908 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1902 


259 


3y2 


July 1, 1908 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1903 


283 


4 


July 1, 1908 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1904 


307 


4 


July 1, 1908 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1893 


50 


4y2 


Oct. 1, 1908 


1,000 


1,000 


April 1, 1905 


332 


3y2 


Apr. 1, 190!> 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1894 


68 ! 


4 


July 1, 1909 


1,000 


1,000 




Amount 


carried 


forward . . 


. * * * * 


$29,(;00 



APPENDIX TO TREASFEER A>v^D COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



35 



SEWER LOAN BONDS.— Continued. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 




Amount 


brought 


forward . . 


• • • • 


$29,000 


July 1, 1897 


185 


4 


July 1, 1909 


$1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1898 


209 


4 


July 1, 1909 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1901 


231 


3y2 


July 1, 1909 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1902 


260 


3V2 


July 1, 1909 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1903 


284 


4 


July 1, 1909 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1904 


308 


4 


July 1, 1909 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1893 


51 


41/2 


Oct. 1, 1909 


1,000 


1,000 


April 1, 1905 


333 


3y2 


Apr. 1,1910 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1894 


69 


4 . 


July 1, 1910 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1897 


186 


4 


July 1, 1910 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1898 


210 


4 


July 1, 1910 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1901 


232 


31/2 


July 1, 1910 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1902 


261 


31/2 


July 1, 1910 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1903 


285 


4 


July 1, 1910 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1904 


309 


4 


July 1, 1910 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1893 


52 


4y2 


Oct. 1, 1910 


1,000 


1,000 


April 1, 1905 


334 


3y2 


Apr. 1,1911 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1894 


70 


4 


July 1, 1911 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1897 


187 


4 


July 1, 1911 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1898 


211 


4 


July 1,1911 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1901 


233 


3y2 


July 1,1911 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1902 


262 


3y2 


July 1,1911 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1903 


286 


4 


July 1,1911 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1904 


310 


4 


July 1,1911 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1893 


53 


4y2 


Oct. 1, 1911 


1,000 


1,000 


April 1, 1905 


335 


3y2 


Apr. 1, 1912 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1894 


71 


4 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1897 


188 


4 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1898 


212 


4 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


1,000 




Amount 


carried 


forward . . 


• • • • 


$58,000 



3G 



Annual reports. 



SEWER LOAN BONDS.— Continued. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 




Amount 


brought 


forward . . 


. . . 


$58,000 


July 1, 1901 


234 


31/2 


July 1, 1912 


$1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1902 


263 


31/2 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1903 


287 


4 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1904 


311 


4 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


1,000 


April 1, 1905 


336 


' 3y2 


Apr. 1,1913 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1894 


72 


4 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1897 


189 


4 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1898 


213 


4 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


1.000 


July 1, 1901 


235 


31/2 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1902 


264 


31/2 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1903 


288 


4 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1904 


312 


4 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


1,000 


April 1, 1905 


337 


31/^ 


Apr. 1,1914 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1894 


73 


4 


July 1, 1914 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1897 


190 


4 


July 1, 1914 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1898 


214 


4 


July 1, 1914 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1901 


236 


3y2 


July 1, 1914 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1902 


265 


31/2 


July 1, 1914 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1903 


289 


4 


July 1, 1914 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1904 


313 


4 


July 1, 1914 


1,000 


1,000 


April 1, 1905 


338 


372 


Apr. 1,1915 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1897 


191 


4 


July 1, 1915 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1898 


215 


4 


July 1, 1915 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1901 


237 


31/2 


July 1, 1915 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1902 


266 


31/2 


July 1, 1915 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1903 


290 


4 


July 1, 1915 


1,000 


1.000 


July 1, 1904 


314 


4 


July 1, 1915 


1,000 


1,000 


April 1, 1905 


339 


31^ 


Apr. 1,1916 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1897 


192 

Amount 


4 
carried 


July 1, 1916 
forward . . 


1,000 


1,000 




$87,000 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



37 



SEWER LOAN BONDS.— Continued. 



DATE. 



July 1, 1898 
July 1, 1901 
July 1, 1902 
July 1, 1903 
July 1, 1904 
»April 1, 1905 
July 1, 1897 
July 1, 1898 
July 1, 1901 
July 1, 1902 
July 1, 1903 
July 1, 1904 
April 1, 1905 
July 1, 1897 
July 1, 1898 
July 1, 1901 
July 1, 1902 
July 1, 1903 
July 1, 1904 
April 1, 1905 
July 1, 1897 
July 1, 1898 
July 1, 1901 
July 1, 1902 
July 1, 1903 
July 1, 1904 
April 1, 1905 
July 1, 1897 
July 1, 1898 



Number of Bonds. 



Amount 

216 

238 

267 

291 

315 

340 

193 

217 

239 

268 

292 
316 

341 

194 

218 

240 

269 

293 

317 

342 

195 

219 

241 

270 

294 

318 

343 

196 

220 

Amount 



Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 



When due. 



Denomi- 
nation. 



brought 

4 

31/2 

31/2 

4 

4 

31/2 

4 

4 

31/2 
31/2 
4 

4 

31/2 
4 
4 

31/2 
31/2 
4 
4 

31/2 
4 
4 

31/2 
31/2 
4 
4 

31/2 

4 

4 

carried 



forward . . 
July 1, 1916 
July 1, 1916 
July 1, 1916 
July 1, 1916 
July 1, 1916 
Apr. 1,1917 
July 1, 1917 
July 1, 1917 
July 1, 1917 
July 1, 1917 
July 1, 1917 
July 1, 1917 
Apr. 1,1918 
July 1, 1918 
July 1, 1918 
July 1, 1918 
July 1, 1918 
July 1, 1918 
July 1, 1918 
Apr. 1, 1919 
July 1, 1919 
July -1,1919 
July 1, 1919 
July 1, 1919 
July 1, 1919 
July 1, 1919 
Apr. 1, 1920 
July 1, 1920 
July 1, 1920 
forward . . 



$1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



Amount. 



$87,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1.000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



$116,000 



38 



ANNUAL EEPOETS. 



SEWER LOAN BONDS.— Continued. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 






Amount 


brought 


forward . 


. . 


$116,000 


July ] 


I, 1901 


242 


3y2 


July 1, 1920 


$1,000 


1,000 


July ] 


I, 1902 


271 


31/2 


July 1, 1920 


1,000 


1,000 


July ] 


[, 1903 


295 


4 


July 1, 1920 


1,000 


1;000 


July . 


I, 1904 


319 


4 


July 1, 1920 


1,000 


1,000 


April 


1, 1905 


344 


31/2 


Apr. 1, 1921 


1,000 


1,000 


July ] 


L, 1897 . 


197 


4 


July 1, 1921 


1,000 


1,000 


July] 


L, 1898 


221 


4 


July 1, 1921 


1,000 


1,000 


July ] 


L, 1901 


243 


31/2 


July 1, 1921 


1,000 


1,000 


July] 


I, 1902 


272 


31/2 


July 1, 1921 


1,000 


1,000 


July ] 


L, 1903 


296 


4 


July 1, 1921 


1,000 


1,000 


July] 


, 1904 


320 


4 


July 1, 1921 


1,000 


1,000 


April 


1, 1905 


345 


31/2 


Apr. 1,1922 


1,000 


1,000 


July] 


L, 1897 


198 


4 


July 1, 1922 


1,000 


1,000 


July ] 


I, 1898 


222 


4 


July 1, 1922 


1,000 


1,000 


July: 


L, 1901 


244 


31/2 


July 1, 1922 


1,000 


1,000 


July - 


1, 1902 


273 


31/2 


July 1, 1922 


1,000 


1,000 


July. 


I, 1903 


297 


4 


July 1, 1922 


1,000 


1,000 


July] 


L, 1904 


321 


4 


July 1, 1922 


1,000 


1,000 


April 


1, 1905 


846 


31/2 


Apr. 1, 1923 


1,000 


1,000 


July. 


I, 1898 


223 


4 


July 1, 1923 


1,000 


1,000 


July - 


I, 1901 


245 


31/2 


July 1, 1923 


1,000 


1,000 


July . 


I, 1902 


274 


31/2 


July 1, 1923 


1,000 


1,000 


July 


I, 1903 


298 


4 


July 1, 1923 


1,000 


1,000 


July] 


L, 1904 


322 


4 


July 1, 1923 


1,000 


1,000 


April 


1, 1905 


347 


31/2 


Apr. 1,1924 


1,000 


1,000 


July 


1, 1901 


246 


3y2 


July 1, 1924 


1,000 


1,000 


July 


1, 1902 


275 


3y2 


July 1, 1924 


1,000 


1,000 


July 


1, 1903 


299 


4 


July 1, 1924 


1,000 


1,000 


July] 


L, 1904 


323 


4 


July 1, 1924 


1,000 


1,000 






Amount 


carried 


forward . 


• • • 


$145,000 



APPENDIX TO TKEASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



SEWER LOAN BONDS.— Continued. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 

cent, of When due. 
Interest 


Denomi 
nation. 


Amount. 




Amount 


brough 


t forward 


$145,000 


April 1, 1005 


348 


3V2 


Apr. 1, 1925 


$1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1901 


247 


31/2 


July 1, 1925 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1902 


276 


31/2 


July 1, 1925 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1903 


300 


4 


July 1, 1925 


1,000 


1,000 


July h 1904 


324 


4 


July 1, 1925 


1,000 


1,000 


April 1, 1905 


349 


31/2 


Apr. 1, 1926 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1901 


248 


31/2 


July 1, 1926 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1902 


277 


31/2 


July 1, 1926 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1903 


301 


4 


July 1, 1926 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1904 


325 


4 


July 1, 1926 


1,000 


1,000 


April 1, 1905 


350 


31/2 


Apr. 1,1927 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1901 


249 


31/2 


July 1, 1927 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1902 


278 


31/2 


July 1, 1927 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1903 


302 


4 


July 1, 1927 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1904 


326 


4 


July 1, 1927 


1,000 


1,000 


April 1, 1905 


351 


31/2 


Apr. 1, 1928 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1901 


250 


3y2 


July 1, 1928 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1903 


303 


4 


July 1, 1928 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1904 


327 


4 


July 1, 1928 


1,000 


1,000 


April 1, 1005 


352 


31/2 


Apr. 1,1929 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1901 


251 


31/2 


July 1, 1929 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1904 


328 


4 


July 1, 1929 


1,000 


1,000 


April 1, 1905 


353 


31/2 


Apr. 1, 1930 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1901 


252 


31/2 


July 1, 1930 


1,000 


1,000 


April 1, 1905 


354 


31/2 


Apr. 1,1931 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1901 


253 


31/2 


July 1, 1931 


1,000 


1,000 


April 1, 1905 


355 


31/2 . 


^pr. 1, 1932 


1,000 


1,000 


April 1, 1905 


356 


31/2 . 


\pr. 1,1933 


1,000 


1,000 


April 1, 1905 


357 


3^2 J 


\pr. 1, 1934 


1,000 


1,000 


April 1, 1905 


358 
of Sewer Loan 


31/2 1 

Bonds 


\pr. 1, 1935 
under debt 1 


1,000 


1,000 


Total amount 


imit . 


$175,000 



40 



ANNUAL EEPOETS. 



SEWER LOAN BONDS.— Concluded. 
ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF CHAPTER 357, ACTS OF 1895, BEYOND THE LIMIT 

FIXED BY LAW. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 


July 1, 1895 


114 to 116 


4 


July 1, 1906 


$1,000 


$3,000 


July 1, 1895 


117 to 119 


4 


July 1, 1907 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1895 


120 to 122 


4 


July 1, 1908 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1895 


123 to 125 


4 


July 1, 1909 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1895 


126 to 128 


4 


July 1, 1910 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1895 


129 to 131 


4 


July 1, 1911 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1895 


132 to 134 


4 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1895 


135 to 137 


4 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1895 


138 to 140 


4 


July 1, 1914 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1895 


141 to 143 


4 


July 1, 1915 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1895 


144 to 146 


4 


July 1, 1916 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1895 


147 to 149 


4 


July 1, 1917 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1895 


150 to 152 


4 


July 1, 1918 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1895 


153 to 155 


4 


July 1, 1919 


^ 1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1895 


156 to 158 


4 


July 1, 1920 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1895 


159 to 161 


4 


July 1, 1921 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1895 


162 to 164 


4 


July 1, 1922 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1895 


165 to 167 


4 


July 1, 1923 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1895 


168 to 170 


4 


July 1, 1924 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1895 


171 to 173 
of Sewer Loan 


4 
Bonds 


July 1, 1925 
under above 


1,000 
Act . . 


3,000 


Total amount 


$60,000 



APPENDIX TO TKEASUEEE AND COLLECTOE S EEPOET. 



41 



City Loan Paving Bonds. 

ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF CHAPTER 153, ACTS OF 1892, BEYOND 

THE LIMIT FIXED BY LAW. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 


October 1, 1892 


m to 70 


4 


Oct. 1, 1906 


$1,000 


$5,000 


October 1, 1892 


71 to 75 


4 


Oct. 1, 1907 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1, 1892 


76 to 80 


4 


Oct. 1, 1908 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1, 1892 


81 to 85 


4 


Oct. 1, 1909 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1, 1892 


86 to 90 


4 


Oct. 1, 1910 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1, 1892 


91 to 95 


4 


Oct. 1, 1911 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1, 1892 


96 to 100 
Total amount of 


4 

Paving 


Oct. 1, 1912 
Bonds 


1,000 


5,000 




$35,000 









4^ 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Water Loan Bonds. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 


July 1, 1876 


30 to 31 


51/2 


July 1, 1906 


$5,000 


$10,000 


July 1, 1896 


b457 


4 


Fuly 1, 1906 


1,000 


. 1,000 


October 1, 1889 


356 to 358 


4 


Oct. 1, 1906 


1,000 


3,000 


October 1, 1890 


454 to 455 


4 


Oct. 1, 1906 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1886 


267 to 276 


4 


July 1, 1907 


1,000 


10,000 


July 1, 1888 


291 


4 


July 1, 1907 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1896 


b458 


4 


July 1, 1907 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889 


359 to 361 


4 


Oct. 1, 1907 


1,000 


3,000 


October 1, 1890 


456 to 457 


4 


Oct. 1, 1907 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1888 


292 


4 


July 1, 1908 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1896 


b459 


4 


July 1, 1908 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889 


362 to 364 


4 


Oct. 1, 1908 


1,000 


3,000 


October 1, 1890 


458 to 459 


4 


Oct. 1, 1908 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1888 


293 


4 


July 1, 1909 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889 


365 to 367 


4 . 


Oct. 1, 1909 


1,000 


3,000 


October 1, 1890 


423 to 424 


4 


Oct. 1, 1909 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1888 


294 


4 


July 1, 1910 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889 


368 to 370 


4 


Oct. 1, 1910 


1,000 


3,000 


October 1, 1890 


426 to 427 


4 


Oct. 1, 1910 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1888 


295 


4 


July 1, 1911 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889 


371 to 373 


4 


Oct. 1, 1911 


1,000 


3,000 


October 1, 1890 


428 to 429 


4 


Oct. 1, 1911 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1888 


296 


4 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889 


374 to 376 


4 


Oct. 1, 1912 


1,000 


3,000 


October 1, 1890 


430 to 431 


4 


Oct. 1, 1912 


1,000 


2,000 




Amount 


carried 


forward . . 


. . . 


4 $64,000 



APPENDIX TO TEEASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



43 



WATER LOAN BONDS.— Concluded. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 




Amount 


brought 


forward . . 


.... 


$64,000 


July 1, 1888 


297 


4 


July 1, 1913 


$1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889 


377 to 379 


4 


Oct. 1, 1913 


1,000 


3,000 


October 1, 1890 


432 to 433 


4 


Oct. 1, 1913 


1,000 


' 2,000 


July 1, 1888 


298 


4 


July 1, 1914 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889 


380 to 382 


4 


Oct. 1, 1914 


1,000 


3,000 


October 1, 1890 


434 to 435 


4 


Oct. 1, 1914 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1888 


299 


4 


July 1, 1915 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889 


383 to 384 


1 
4 


Oct. 1, 1915 


1,000 


2,000 


October 1, 1890 


436 to 437 


4 


Oct. 1, 1915 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1888 


300 


4 


July 1, 1916 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889 


385 to 38G 


4 


Oct. 1, 1916 


1,000 


2,000 


October 1, 1890 


438 to 439 


4 


Oct. 1, 1916 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1888 


301 


4 


July 1, 1917 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889 


387 to 388 


4 


Oct. 1, 1917 


1,000 


2,000 


October 1, 1890 


440 to 441 


4 


Oct. 1, 1917 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1888 


302 


4 


July 1, 1918 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889 


389 to 390 


4 


Oct. 1, 1918 


1,000 


2,000 


October 1, 1890 


442 to 443 


4 


Oct. 1, 1918 


1,000 


2,000 


October 1, 1889 


391 to 392 


4 


Oct. 1, 1919 


1,000 


2,000 


October 1, 1890 


444 to 445 


4 


Oct. 1, 1919 


1,000 


2,000 


October 1, 1890 


446 to 447 
Total amount 


4 

of 


Oct. 1, 1920 
Water Loan 


1,000 
Bonds 


2,000 




$102,000 



44 



ANNUAL REPOKTS. 



Metropolitan Park Assessment Loan Bonds. 

ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF CHAPTER 225, ACTS OF 1902, BEYOND 



THE LIMIT FIXED BY LAW. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


When due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 


July 1, 1902 


4 


31/2 


July 1, 1906 


$1,000 


$1,000 


July 1, 


1902 


5 


ZVz 


July 1, 1907 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 


1902 


6 


dV2 


July 1, 1908 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 


1902 


7 


31/2 


July 1, 1909 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 


1902 


8 


31/2 


July 1, 1910 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 


1902 


9 


31/2 


July 1, 1911 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 


1902 


10 


31/2 


July 1, 1912 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 


1902 


11 


31/2 


July 1, 1913 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1 


1902 


12 


31/2 


July 1, 1914 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1 


1902 


13 


31/2 


July 1, 1915 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1 


1902 


14 


31/2 


July 1, 1916 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1 


1902 


15 


3y2 


July 1,1917 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1 


, 1902 


16 


SV2 


July 1, 1918 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1 


1902 


17 


BV2 


July 1, 1919 


1,000 


1,000 


Julyl 


, 1902 


18 


31/2 


July 1, 1920 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1 


, 1902 


19 


3y2 


July 1, 1921 


1,000 


1,000 


Julyl 


, 1902 


20 


31/2 


July 1, 1922 


1,000 


1,000 


Julyl 


, 1902 


21 


3y2 


July 1, 1923 


1,000 


1,000 


Julyl 


, 1902 


22 


3y2 


July 1, 1924 


1,000 


1,000 


Julyl 


, 1902 


23 


3y2 


July 1, 1925 


1,000 


1,000 


Julyl 


, 1902 


24 


, 3y2 


July 1, 1926 


1,000 


1,000 


Julyl 


, 1902 


25 


3y2 


July 1, 1927 


1,000 


1,000 


Julyl 


, 1902 


26 


SV2 


July 1, 1928 


1,000 


1,000 


Julyl 


, 1902 


27 
of Metropolitan 


3y2 

Park As 


July 1, 1929 
sessment Loan 


1,000 
Bonds 


1,000 


T 


'otal amount 


$24,000 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 45 



Recapitulation. 

City Loan Bonds $1,114,000 00 

Sewer Loan Bonds 175,000 00 



Total amount of Funded Debt within 

the limit provided by law . . . $1,289,000 00 

Sewer Loan Bonds, issued under Chapter 

357, Acts of 1895 $60,000 00 

City Loan Bonds, issued under Chapter 

153. Acts of 1892 85,000 00 

Metropolitan Park Assessment Loan Bonds, 

issued under Chapter 325, Acts of 1902 24,000 00 



Total -^amount of Funded Debt outside 
of the limit allowed bv law, issued 

under special Acts . .' 119,000 00 

Water Loan Bonds 102,000 00 



Total amount of Funded Debt . . . . , $1,510,000 00 



46 



ANXTJAL EEPORTS. 



TABLE C STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS, SHOWING APPROPRI- 

ATIONS, EXPENDITURES, ETC., TO DECEMBER 31, 1905. 



Appropriations. 

CREDIT. 

Taxes, amount assessed for municipal purposes . 
Property and Debt Balance, amount provided by issue of 
bonds 



wn-tail Moth 



DEBIT. 

Appropriations from tax levy: — 
Assessors 
City Auditor 
City Clerk 
City Engineer . 
City Messenger 
City Solicitor . 
City Treasurer 
Clerk of Committees and Departments 
Contingent Fund 
Election Expenses: — 

City Clerk 

Commissioner of Public Buildings 

Pay of Election Officers 

Registrars of Voters 
Electrical Department 
Excess and Deficiency 
Executive Department 
Fire Department 
Health Department 
Highways. Maintenance 
Highways, Removal of Bro 

from Trees 
Inspection of Buildings 
Interest 
Military Aid 
Police 

Printing and Stationery 
and stationery for 
m.en) 
Public Buildings Maintenance 

City Hall . 

City Hall Annex 

Fire Department 

Health Department 

Highways . 

Janitors' Salaries 

Police 

Public Grounds . 

Public Library . 

Schoolhouses 

Sewer Department 

Support of Poor 

Water Department 
Public Grounds 
Public Library 
Reduction of Funded Debt 

Amount carried forward 



(public documents 
the board of aldet- 



$898,563 00 

148,000 00 

$1,046,563 00 



$10,000 00 



725 
5.500 
11.250 
2,000 
2.250 
9.300 
3,900 
3,000 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



1,600 00 
750 00 
2.164 00 
1.550 00 
7,000 00 

45,510 00 
3.900 00 
3.535 00 

39,500 00 
4.000 00 



3.000 
.4.050 
76.159 

1,100 
39,000 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



2,000 00 



3,000 

450 

5,000 

345 

300 

26.000 

1.100 

100 

4,000 

25,000 

75 

800 

300 

10.500 

14,500 00 

130,500 00 

$504,713 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



APPENDIX TO TEEASITRER A^B COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 47 



Amount brought forward . 
School Contingent . 
School Teachers' Salaries 
Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Sidewalks, Maintenance . 
Soldiers' Relief 
Somerville Hospital 
Street Lights .... 
Support of Poor, City I^ome 
Support of Poor, Miscellaneous 



Appropriations on Funded Debt account: 
Public Buildings Construction: — 

Addition to Bingham School . 

Contagious Disease Flospital . 

Dormitory at City Home 

Engine House in Ward Two . 

PTigh School Building 

Proctor School .... 
Highways, Construction . 
Highways. Pa\ed Gutters and Crossings 
Highways, Shade Trees and Tree Guards 
Sidewalks Construction .... 
Thorndike-strect Subway 
Sewers Construction .... 



$504,713 00 

23,500 00 

260,000 00 

1,050 00 

3,000 00 

18,500 00 

5,000 00 

66,000 00 

• 2,800 00 

14,000 00 



$1,000 

5,000 

1,000 

3,000 

40,000 

10,000 

20,000 

20,000 

1,400 

16,000 

600 

30,000 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



Assessors. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 .... 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Receipts: — 
Watering Streets account, clerical service 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid Albert B. Fales, salary as chair- 
man of the board of assessors 
Benjamin F. Thompson, assessor 
Nathan H. Reed, assessor 
Jesse J. Underbill, assessor 
Harry A. True, assessor . 
George E. Elliott, assessor 
Fred B. Clapp, assistant assessor 
Walter F. Turner, assistant assessor 
George E. Elliott, assistant assessor 
John J. Sheeran, assistant assessor 
Jennie L. Jones, first assistant clerk 

carfares ..... 

Mabel E. Hall, second assistant clerk 
Aunita N. Fales, third assistant clerk 

carfares 

Theodore H. Locke, clerical services 



$2,000 00 
800 00 
800 00 
466 62 
800 00 
200 00 
250 00 
250 00 
225 00 
250 00 
700 00 
15 90 
600 00 
500 00 
6 80 
49 00 



$898,563 00 



148,000 00 
$1,046,563 00 



$10,000 00 
81 31 

$10,081 31 

70 67 

$10,151 98 



Amount carried forward 



$7,913 32 



4S 



ANXUAL EEPOKTS. 



Amount brought forward . 

Charles R. Palmer, clerical services 
Raymond A. Farr, clerical services 
George H. Crosby, clerical services 
Florence H. Plimpton, clerical services 
Eva V. Tukey, clerical services 

carfares 

Alice C. Rand, clerical services 
Agnes F. Kennard, clerical services 
Abbie D. Southworth, clerical services 
Loena A. Snowman, clerical services 
Marcella F. Kendall, clerical services 
Josephine M. Briggs, clerical services 
Yawman & Erbe Mfg. Co.. stationery 
Samuel Ward Co., stationery . 
L. E. Clayton, stationery . 
Thomas Groom & Co., stationery . 
Fred I. Farwell, stationery 
Somerville Journal Co., printing 
Boston Printing Co., printing precinct 

lists 

Wesley A. Maynard, advertising . 
Somerville Post-office, postage 
Carter's Ink Co.. ink 
W. A. Greenough & Co.. directory 
New England Telephone & Telegrapl 

Co., service 

Gridlev's Coffee House, supper 



Cash. 

Payments as follows 

Assessors 
City Auditor 
City Clerk . 
City Engineer . 
City Messenger 
City Solicitor 
City Treasurer . 
Clerk of Committees 
Contingent Fund 
County of Middlesex 
Coupons Unpaid 
Election Expenses: — 

City Clerk 

Commissioner of Public B 

Pay of Election Officers 

Registrars of Voters 
Electrical Department 
Executive Department 
Fire Department 
Fire Department, Combmat 

Engine 
Grade Crossings 
Health Department • • . 
Health Department, Collection 
Highways Construction 



CREDIT. 



Amount carried forward 



Ildings 



on Ladder 



of Ashes and Off 



$7,913 32 

72 00 

50 00 

58 00 

142 G8 

131 35 

1 90 
141 33 
130 67 
150 00 
122 01 
104 00 

22 07 

10 95 

201 14 

95 

2 10 
1 15 

14'3 50 

574 20 

32 00 

32 00 

1 13 

3 50 

101 43 

8 00 



and 



al 



Chemical 



$10,151 98 



$10,151 
708 

7.390 
11,279 

2,111 

2,294 
13,148 

3,900 

1,885 
57,805 88 
60.035 00 



1,169 
1,062 
2.153 
1,633 
8,090 
3,845 



9S 
9S 
08 
34 
78 
09 

m 

00 
40 



99 
53 
00 
79 
36 
39 



68,124 08 

2.350 00 
522 70 

6,779 04 
44,083 65 
42,623 50 

$353,149 22 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



49 



Prospect 



Amount brought forward . . . ' . 

Highways Maintenance 

Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings 
Highways, Paving Broadway, Bow and Summer 
Highways, Removal of Brown-tail Moths . 
Highways, Shade Trees . 
Highways, Watering Streets . 
]nspection of BOildings . 

Interest 

Military Aid 

Overlay and Abatement . 
Powder-house Boulevard 

Police 

Printing and Stationery . 
Public Buildings Construction: — 
Addition to Bingham School 
Contagious Disease Hospital 
Dormitory at City Home . 
Engine House in Ward Two 
Health Department 
High School Building . 
Historical Building and Observatory 
Luther V. Bell School Fire Escapes 
Proctor School Completion 
Rifle Range in Waltham 
Public Buildingb Maintenance 
City Hall 

City Hall Annex . 
Fire Department . 
Health Department 
Highways 
Janitors' Salaries . 
Police .... 
Public Grounds 
Public Library 
Schoolhouses 
Sewer Department 
Support of Poor . 
Water Department 
Public Grounds 
Public Library 

Public Library, Isaac Pitman Fund 
Public Library, Isaac Pitman Fund 
Public Library, Isaac Pitman Fund 
Public Property ' . 
Reduction of Funded Debt . 
Redemption of Tax Liens 
School Contingent . 
School Teachers' Salaries 
Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Sewers Construction 
Sewers Maintenance 
Sidewalks Construction 
Sidewalks Maintenance 
Soldiers' Burials 
Soldiers' Relief 
Somerville Hospital 
State Aid . 
State of Massachusetts 

Amount carried forward 



Streets 



Hi 



Investment 
Income. Art 
Income, Poetry 



$353,149 22 


67,687 17 


10,464 19 


591 85 


4,795 66 


1,751 81 


21,622 92 


4,119 45 


16,685 39 


1,866 85 


218 63 


369 30 


77,600 48 


1,959 05 


388 11 


4,187 47 


1,285 86 


1,545 81 


1,189 79 


16,543 44 


159 89 


765 19 


35,443 96 


20 22 


2,644 89 


491 10 


5,482 37 


444 30 


429 94 


26,741 25 


1,187 08 


36 64 


3,189 22 


29,839 50 


31 22 


1,319 36 


306 74 


10,998 30 


19,358 22 


bl4 58 


161 16 


45 73 


535 85 


129,500 00 


1,473 56 


25,036 81 


254,674 12 


1,473 29 


22,792 87 


12,118 76 


23,781 39 


3,038 49 


630 00 


21,961 13 


5,000 00 


14,600 00 


137,893 76 


$1,381,943 34 



50 



AN?s^TJAL REPORTS. 



Ashe 



s and 



Amount brought forward . 
Street Lights .... 
Support of Poor, City Home . 
Support of Poor, Miscellaneous 
Temporary Loans 
Water Works Extension 
Water Maintenance . 
Water Works, Abatements on Water Charges 
Balance to debit of account, 1906 . 



DEBIT 

Balance from 1904 .... 

Receipts as follows: — 
Assessors .... 

City Clerk .... 

City Engineer .... 
City Treasurer 
Contingent Fund 
County of Middlesex 
Electrical Department 
Excise Tax .... 

Fire Department 
Funded Debt .... 
Health Department 
Health Department, Collection of 

Ofifal . . . 
Highway Betterment Assessments 
Highways Construction . 
Highways Maintenance . 
Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings 
Highways, Removal of Brown-tail Moths 
Highways, Shade Trees . 
Highways, Watering Streets 
Inspection of Buildings . 
Interest .... 
Metered Water Charges . 
Overlay and Abatement 
Police .... 

Public Buildings Construction 

Building 
Public Buildings Maintenance 

City Hall 
• Health Department 

Highways 

Schoolhouses 

Support of Poor 
Public Grounds 
Public Library 
Public Library, Isaac Pitman 

ment .... 
Public Library, Isaac Pitman 

Art .... 
Public Library, Isaac Pitman 

Poetry 
Public Property 
Real Estate Liens 
Reduction of Funded Debt 



High School 



Fund, Invest- 
Fund, Income, 
Fund, Income, 



$73,743 56 

70 67 

2,303 03 

42 87 

4,640 70 

309 00 

4,705 14 

52 61 

223 01 

300 21 

148,000 00 

521 02 



Amount carried forward 



4,854 S6 

4.833 14 

4,471 19 

' 14.060 67 

331 46 

340 46 

151 95 

110 00 

102 27 

10,906 18 

14,628 83 

23 62 

5,118 81 

6 00 

1 50 
210 00 
240 00 
108 55 
35 00 
498 53 
753 08 

314 58 

240 00 

00 00 

1,200 00 

16 12 

442 52 

$298,971 14 



$1,381,913 34 

65,930 49 

7,474 36 

17,527 88 

625,000 00 

16,845 95 

42,227 11 

487 20 

116,483 89 

$2,273,920 22 



APPENDIX TO TREASUREE AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 51 



Amount brought forward . 
Redemption of Tax Liens 
School Contingent . 
Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Sewer Assessments . 
Sewers Construction 
Sewers Maintenance 
Sidewalk Assessments 
Sidewalks Construction 
Sidewalks Maintenance 
Soldiers' Relief 
State Aid . 
State of Massachusetts 
Street Lights 
Support of Poor, City Home . 
Support of Poor, Miscellaneous 

Taxes 

Temporary Loans . 
Water Works Income . 
Water Service Assessments 
Water Works Extension 
Water Maintenance . 







$298,971 14 

1,527 53 

175 00 








430 07 








2,637 12 








270 37 








120 48 








12,648 81 








2,491 88 
45 44 








53 00 








52 00 








2,222 68 
39 60 








3,912 24 

2,989 20 








1,103,852 99 

625,000 00 
197,776 12 








4,456 58 

49 77 




• 


14,198 20 


$2,273,920 22 





City Auditor. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations,, from Taxes, 1905 .... 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Charles S. Robertson, salary as 

auditor 

Thomas Groom & Co., stationery . 
Pneumatic Hand Stamp Co., stamps 



$725 00 
16 02 



$708 98 



$700 00 




2 15 




6 83 






$708 98 


— 



City Clerk. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 .... 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of Frederic W. Cook, C 
Recording mortgages 
Dog licenses 
Marriage certificates 
Licenses for billiards and pool 
Licenses for amusements . 
Licenses for street musicians 
Copies of records 
Junk licenses 
Licenses for slaughtering . 

Amounts carried forward . 



itv Clerk:- 



$523 25 


393 00 


363 00 


140 00 


41 00 


14 00 


52 25 


390 00 


6 00 



$5,500 00 
412 95 

$5,087 05 



$1,922 50 $5,087 05 



5-3 



AXNtJAL EEPORTg. 



Amounts brought forward 
Licenses for private detectives . 

Liquor licenses 

Licenses for sale of fireworks . 
Licenses for intelligence offices 
Auctioneers' licenses .... 
Roller skating . , . 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., advertising hearing 
Interest on deposits .... 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid George L Vincent, salary as city 

clerk 

Frederic W. Cook, salary as city clerk 

commission fee 
Howard E. Wemyss, assistant city clerk 

fee on appointment 
Clara B. Snow, first assistant . 
Edith A. Woodman, second assistant 
Alice M. Vincent, third assistant 
Mabell M. Ham, fourth assistant 
Charles E. Davis, census of births 
Clara Z. Elliot, census of births 
Seth Mason, census of births . 
William R. Scott, census of births 
Richard H. Tincker, census of births 
Elisabeth S. Webster, census of births 
Herbert S. Chapman, census of births 
Sundry persons, return of births 
Sundry undertakers, reporting deaths 
The Carter's Ink Co., ink . 
The Monarch Typewriter Co., typewriter 

and table 

Smith-Premier Typewriter Co., repairing 

typewriter 

Oliver Typewriter Co., repairs . 
Thomas Groom & Co., stationery . 
McGrath & Woodley, stationery 
Samuel Ward Co., stationery . , . 
Thorpe & Martin Co., stationery 
Yawman & Erbe Mfg. Co., stationery 
Hobbs & Warren Co., stationery 
Somerville Journal Co., printing 
Webcowit Press, printing 
Wesley A. Maynard, printing . 
T. H. Ball, mortgage forms 
Macey- Wernicke Co., cabinet and cards 
Pneumatic Hand Stamp Co., stamps 
Beck Duplicator Co., duplicating machine 
Allen, Doane & Co., badges 
Somerville Post-office, postage 
W. A. Greenough & Co., directory 
Sampson & Murdock Co., directory 
Doten-Dunton Desk Co., chair 



$1,922 50 

20 00 
34 00 

49 00 
22 00 
46 00 

50 00 

147 15 

12 38 



$5,087 05 



$265 18 

1,933 99 

5 00 

1.032 15 

5 00 
700 00 
(500 00 
550 00 
500 00 

48 40 
25 00 
50 20 
33 30 
41 20 
10 90 

6 40 
344 25 
188 50 

2 26 

95 00 

14 00 
1 50 

54 75 
192 95 

73 74 
1 23 

12 00 

1 50 
400 65 

25 50 
25 75 

2 75 
22 08 

3 36 
8 50 
1 95 

28 00 

■ 3 50 

6 00 

6 50 



2,303 03 
$7,890 08 



Amount carried forward, 



$7,292 94 



APPEI^DIX TO TREASUKEK AND COLLECTORS REPORT. 



Amount brought forward .... 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service .... 
Oriental Tea Co., coffee . 
Whitney & Snow, cuticline 
American Express Co., expressing 
Oilman Express Co., expressing 
Glines & Co., expressing . 



$7,292 94 

79 38 

1 05 

20 

15 81 
55 
15 



$7,390 08 



City Engineer. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 .... 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of E. W. Bailey, telephone 
Abutters on Nashua street, plan 
Vernon street, plan 
Giles park, plan 
Hamlet street, plan 
Thorpe place, plan 
Hinckley street, plan 



Stock and labor billed other departments 
School Contingent account, maps . 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Ernest W. Bailey, salary as city 
engineer ...... 

Engineer's assistants 

Engineer's assistants, carfares . 

Thomas Groom & Co., stationery . 

Wadsworth, Howland & Co., stationery 

M. L. Vinal, stationery 

A. C. Libby & Sons, stationery 

L. E. Clayton, cotton cloth 

Charles E. Moss, paper 

Library Bureau, guides 

Frost & Adams Co., supplies . 

George O. W. Servis, photographs . 

Sprague & Hathaway Co., prints 

George H. Walker & Co., maps 

Whitney & Snow, hardware 

Eyelet Tool Co., punching pins 

W. P. Rice, targets .... 

E. T. Bynner, spikes .... 

Davenport-Brown Co., spruce . 

G. G. Ledder, repairing instruments 

Municipal Journal and Engineer, sub 
scription 

New England Telephone & Telegraph 
Co., service 

Somerville Post-office, postage 



$4 87 



^2,800 00 

7,885 39 

192 75 

32 55 

10 24 

2 33 

9 00 



00 
90 

50 



46 18 

41 75 
7 22 
6 00 

42 33 
1 50 
3 75 
9 75 

75 
25 



(5 
32 



3 00 

93 25 
19 50 



$11,250 00 
13 53 



$11,236 47 





5 00 








8 00 








5 00 








5 00 








5 00 








8 00 




40 87 


— 


• 




2 00 




$11 


279 34 



Amount carried forward 



$11,253 89 



54 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 
Glines & Co., expressing , 
American Express Co., expressing 
Oilman & Co., expressing . 



Sewers Maintenance account, setting bounds, 



$11,253 89 

15 

1 55 

25 


$11,255 84 
23 50 



$11,279 34 



City Messenger. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 .... 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid Jairus Mann, salary as city mes- 
senger $1,500 00 

disbursements 4 85 

L. H. Brown, carriage hire ... 73 00 

Howard Lowell & Son, carriage hire . 11 00 

Charles K. Smith, horse .... 140 00 

Charles R. Simpson, veterinary services . 3 00 
S. C. & A. L. Jameson, board of horse, 

etc 304 60 

J. H. Atkinson, painting .... 12 00 

Pearl-street Shoeing Forge, horseshoeing, 12 35 

M. A. Mann, work on invitations, etc. . 7 00 

M. E. Youngjohn, cheese cloth ... 65 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service 16 68 

Thomas Groom & Co., envelopes . . 2 50 

D. J. Bennett, harness work ... 14 00 

H. A. Brownell, harness work ... 2 65 

C. L. Underbill, carriage repairing . . 7 50 



$2,000 00 
111 78 

$2,111 78 



$2,111 78 



City Solicitor. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 .... 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



I DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid Frank W. Kaan, salary as city 

solicitor 

office rent 

disbursements 

Thomas Damery, salary as claim agent . 

disbursements 

Addison C. Getchell & Son, brief and 
extra copies 

Amount carried forward .... 



$1,800 00 


150 


00 


149 


19 


100 00 


15 


60 


29 


00 



$2,250 00 
44 09 

$2,294 09 



$2,243 79 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



55 



Amount brought forward .... $2,243 79 
McGrath & Woodley, stationery . . 13 00 
Saidee M. Swift, services as court stenog- 
rapher 18 00 

Isaac I. Doane, testimony .... 19 30 



$2,294 09 



City Treasurer. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Receipts: — 
Commonweahh of Massachusetts, fees for 

collecting National Bank tax 
Real Estate Liens, costs ..... 
Cash, received of sundry persons, costs on 

taxes and assessments, $4,040.70 — .20 . 



'erred . 


$9,300 00 
818 25 




$8,481 75 


$22 56 
3 85 




4,640 50 


4,666 91 





$13,148 QQ 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid James F. Beard, salary as city 

treasurer $3,000 00 

Charles L. Ellis, deputy collector of 

taxes 1,350 00 

disbursements 18 40 

Beulah M. Peirce, first assistant . . 1,000 00 
Louise B. McLaughlin, second assistant . 700 00 
Florence M. Grow, third assistant . . GOO 00 
Marion C. Kendall, fourth assistant . 500 00 
Winnifred P. Briggs, clerical assistant . 137 33 
Susan L. Briggs, clerical assistant . . 138 66 
Lilla A. Johnson, clerical assistant . . 141 32 
Josephine M. Briggs, clerical assistant . 25 33 
Florence A. Eaton, clerical assistant . 29 33 
Agnes F. Kennard, clerical assistant . 9 33 
John M. Driscoll, fees for collecting de- 
linquent taxes 1 00 

F. W. Hopkins, fees for collecting de- 
linquent taxes 244 00 

Malcolm E. Sturtevant, fees for collecting- 
delinquent taxes 667 02 

Theodore H. Locke, fees for collecting 

delinquent taxes 96 50 

Charles E. Davis, fees for collecting de- 
linquent taxes ..... 533 50 
Somerville National Bank, clearing house 

charges . . 2 71 

National Security Bank, clearing house 

charges 1 ^3 

Bunker Hill National Bank, clearing 

house charges , -^^ 

Thomas Groom & Co., stationery . . 366 45 

Amount carried forward , , . , $9,562 91 



56 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 
McGrath & Woodley, stationery 
Webcowit Press, printing tax bills, etc. 
Somerville Journal Co., printing, and ad 

vertising tax sale, etc. . 
Wesley A. Maynard, printing . 
W. A. Greenough & Co., directories 
Henry M. Meek Publishing Co., direc 

tory 

Sampson & Murdock Co., directory 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service 

Edwin O. Childs, recording 
Howard Lowell & Son, carriage hire 
American Surety Co. of New York, treas 

urer's bond 

Yale & Towne Mfg. Co., cleaning and 

insuring time lock .... 
Damon Safe & Vault Eng. Co., cleaning 

locks, etc. ..... 

Burroughs Adding Machine Co., inspec 

tion 

Smith-Premier Typewriter Co., type 

writer 

Somerville Post-office, postage 
Outlook Envelope Co., envelopes . 
George A. Smith, sharpening erasers 
The Carter's Ink Co., ink . 
Forbes Lithographing & Mfg. Co., en 

graving bonds 

Boston News Bureau, subscription . 
Dennison Mfg. Co., consecutive numbers 
American Express Co., expressing ^. 
Glines & Co., expressing . 
Gilman Express Co., expressing 



$9,562 91 

25 00 

460 25 

1,898 67 
7 50 
7 00 

2 50 
6 00 

92 27 

20 37 

4 00 

160 00 

15 00 

6 75 

90 

119 25 

521 85 

104 21 

38 

11 25 

110 00 

9 00 

2 50 

45 

50 

15 



$13,148 06 



Clerk of Committees and Departments. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 . 



$3,900 00 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid William P. Mitchell, salary as 
clerk of committees and departments 
appointment as justice of the peace 
Howard E. Wemyss. assistant . 
Lawrence S. Howard, assistant 
Lucia A. Manning, assistant 
Bessie L. L. Crosby, assistant . 
Thomas Grcom & Co.. stationery . 
Smith-Premier Typewriter Co., paper 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service . . . 
Somerville Journal Co., printing 
W. A. Greenough & Co., directory . 
Somerville Post-office, postage . 



$2,000 


00 


7 


00 


139 88 


450 


00 


600 


00 


500 


00 


56 


00 


1 


15 


34 


10 


36 


50 


3 


50 


71 


87 



$3,900 00 



APPENDIX TO TEEASUEER AND COLLECTOE's EEPOET. 57 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

CREDIT. 



State Tax 

National Bank Tax 

Armory Loan Sinking Fund, 1905 

Interest on, 1905 

Metropolitan Parks Loan Sinking Fund, 

1905 . . ^ 

Interest on, 1905 

Cost of Maintenance, 1905 .... 

Metropolitan Sewer Loan Sinking Fund, 
North Metropolitan System, 1905 . 

Interest on, 1905 

Cost of Maintenance, 1905 .... 

Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund, 

1905 

Interest on. 1905 

Cost of Maintenance, 1905 .... 



Cash 



DEBIT 



Balance from 1904 . 
Corporation Taxes, 1904 . 
Corporation Taxes, 1905 
National Bank Tax, 1904 
National Bank Tax, 1905 
Burial of State Paupers . 
Support of Sick Paupers 
Temporary Support of Paupers 
Tuition of Children 
Street Railway Tax . 
Boston Elevated Railway Tax . 
Fees for collecting National Bank 
Military Aid .... 
Water Receipts, Sinking Fund 
Cash 



State Aid, 1905 . 
Soldiers' Burials, 1905 
Military Aid, 1905 . 



Balance to debit of account, 1906 



Tax 



. , , 


$70,400 00 


. 


1,581 12 


$1,630 39 




2,284 03 






3,914 42 




$4,819 11 




11,524 08 




8,641 61 






24,984 80 




$6,908 62 




26,058 34 




18,886 14 






51,853 10 




$21,358 11 




55,535 91 




13,666 71 






90,560 73 






$243,294 17 


$988 88 




21 43 




966 17 




226 96 




19 24 






222 68 




LU^tULU^ \j\J 




$245,516 85 


$15,903 87 




893 99 




24.741 13 




79 89 




5,424 97 




85 00 




823 18 




450 54 




97 00 




50.165 40 




8,107 66 




15 81 




25 00 




809 65 




137,893 76 






$245,516 85 
$14,548 00 




• 


630 00 


* . • 


933 42 



$16,111 42 
$16,111 42 



58 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Contingent Fund. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 . 

Amounts transferred and unused: — 
Amount transferred to Public Buildings 

Maintenance, Schoolhouses account 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance 

transferred 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of sundry persons, licenses 

to peddle 

Sundry persons, druggists' licenses . 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid E. F. Hicks, refreshments . 
George B. Phillips, refreshments 
Walter A. Dow, refreshments . 
Walter H. Snow, refreshments . 
Jairus Mann, disbursements 
Goodenough & Co., turkeys 
F. H. Hosmer, turkeys 
James H. Maguire, turkeys 
Howard Lowell & Son, carriage hire 
The Two Jamesons, carriage hire 
Eugene Mead, carriage hire 
Ralph A. Wiswell, ringing bell . 
George Colbath, ringing bell . 
Asbury Strahan, ringing bell . 
Trueman H. Thorpe, ringing bell . 
W. C. Towne, ringing bell 
George B. Wiswall, ringing bell 
J. Howard Colbath, ringing bell 
Henry A. Kendall, ringing bell 
Mrs. J. G. Anthoine, rent of hall 
Somerville Journal Co., printing 
New England Decorating Co., draping 

hall 

Company K, Eighth Regiment, M. V. M. 

rifle practice 

Company M, Eighth Regiment, M. V. M. 

rifle practice 

Willard C. Kinsley Post, 139, G. A. R. 

observanci^ of Memorial Day 
Veteran Association, Company M, 

Eighth Regiment, of the Spanish War, 

decoration of graves of comrades 
Charles D. Elliot, services 
F. T; Wingate, services 
B. F. F'reeman, frames 
Charles L. Ellis, disbursements 
Bent & Bush, badges . 

Amount carried forward 



$3,000 00 



$1,300 00 
123 60 



$275 00 
34 00 



$94 00 


3 00 


1 50 


45 31 


4 60 


129 00 


299 60 


174 79 


61 00 


25 00 


12 00 


2 00 


2 00 


4 00 


2 00 


4 00 


2 00 


2 00 


2 00 


20 00 


43^0 


50 00 


150 00 


150 00 


400 00 


50 00 


10 00 


5 00 


11 00 


4 00 


2 50 



1,423 60 
$1,576 40 



309 00 
$1,885 40 



$1,765 80 



APPENDIX TO TREASUEEK AND COLLECTOE's EEPOET. 59 

Amount brought forward .... $1,765 80 

O. W. Short, janitor's services . . 5 00 

Somerville Post-office, stamps ... 35 00 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 25 per 

cent, of druggists' Hcenses ... 8 50 

J. W. Howard, plants 40 00 

M. B. Bunker, flowers .... 20 00 

Whitney & Snow, figures .... 11 10 

$1,885 40 

County of Middlesex. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 $57,805 88 

Receipts: — 
Cash, received of J. O. Hayden, treasurer, 

rent of court room $(300 00 

return on amount received of the 
city for dog licenses in 1904 . . 4,105 14 

4,705 14 

$62,511 02 
Amounts transferred and unused: — 
Public Buildings Maintenance, Police ac- 
count, amount transferred . . . 600 00 
Public Library account, amount trans- 
ferred 4,105 14 

4,705 14 

: , $57,805 88 

DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid County Tax $57,805 88 

Coupons Unpaid. 

CREDIT. 

Balance of coupons unpaid January 1, 1905 .... $26,057 50 
Coupons maturing April 1, 1905: — 
Water Loan, $72,000, six months at 4 per 

cent $1,440 00 

Sewer Loan, $7,000, six months at 4V2 per 

cent 157 50 

Paving Loan, $40,000, six months at 4 per 

cent 800 00 

City Loan, $41,000, six months at 4 per 

cent 820 00 

■ 3,217 50 

Coupons maturing July 1, 1905: — 
City Loan, $299,000, six months at 3V2 per 

cent. $5,282 50 

City Loan, $768,500, six months at 4 per 

cent 15,370 00 

Sewer Loan, $50,000, six months at 3^^ 

per cent. . . . . . • • 875 00 

Sewer Loan, $160,000, six months at 4 per 

cent. . 3,200 00 

Amounts carried forward .... $24,677 50 $29,275 00 



^^ ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amounts brought forward . . . $24 C77 50 

Metropolitan Park Assessment Loan, 

$25,000, six months at S^/^ per cent. . 437 50 

Water Loan, $26,000, six months at 4 per 

„/^e"t- • •_ 520 00 

Water Loan, $10,000, six months at 5^^ per 
cent 275 00 

Coupons maturing October 1, 1905:— 
City Loan, $41,000, six months at 4 per 

^ cent $820 00 

City Loan, $118,000. six months at SV2 per 

cent ; 2,065 00 

Sewer Loan, $7,000, six months at 4^/^ per 

cent 157 50 

Sewer Loan, $30,000, six months at SV2 per 

cent 525 00 

Paving Loan, $40,000, six months at 4 per 

cent 800 00 

Water Loan, $72,000, six months at 4 per 

cent 1,440 00 

Coupons maturing January 1, 1906: — 

City Loan, $269,000, six months at 31/2 per 

cent $4,707 50 

City Loan, $691,000, six months at 4 per 

cent. 13,820 00 

Sewer Loan, $48,000, six months at 3^ per 

cent 840 00 

Sewer Loan, $151,000, six months at 4 per 

cent. 3,020 00 

Metropolitan Park Assessment Loan, 

$24,000, six months at 3^/2 per cent. . 420 00 

Water Loan, $25,000, six months at 4 per 

cent 500 00 

Water Loan. $10,000, six months at 5y2 per 

cent. . 275 00 



DEBIT. 



Cash, paid coupons 
Coupons of 1905 unpaid 



$60,035 00 
24,540 00 



$29,275 00 



25,910 00 



5,807 50 



23,582 50 

$84,575 00 



$84,575 00 



Election Expenses, City Clerk. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 .... 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



DEBIT. 

I (Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Somerville Journal, printing 
Webcowit Press, printing 
Wesley A. Maynard, printing . 

Amount carried forward . . . . 



$772 05 
16 75 
54 25 



$843 05 



$1,600 00 
430 01 

$1,169 99 



Appendix to treasurer and collectors report. 



r>i 



Amount brought forward . 
McGrath & Woodley, stationery 
Samuel Ward Co., stationery . 
H. Wood, making tag and chain 
A. F, Carpenter, candles . 
L. E. Clayton, tape 
Cotton & Gould, crayons . 
Robert S. Robson, inspecting ballot 

boxes ..... 

Whitney & Snow, hardware 
John Donnelly & Sons, posting 
L. H. Brown, carriage hire 
Glines & Co., expressing . 



$843 


05 


31 


75 


21 


39 




25 




60 


1 


00 


12 


00 


42 


00 


1 80 


35 


00 


181 


00 




15 



■SI, 169 99 



Election Expenses, Commissioner of Public Buildings. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 ..... 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Philip Eberle, rent of hall . 
Simon Connor & Co.. rent of hall . 
Odd Fellows Building Association, ren 

of hall 

Warren E. Locke, rent of hall . 
Copithorne Brothers, oil . 
L. G. Columbus & Co.. steamfitting 
James W. O'Neil, plumbing 
Harris P. Tibbetts, carpentering 
Davenport-Brown Co., lumber 
L. A. Penney, rubberoid roof . 



$100 00 
48 00 

80 00 
24 00 



90 
85 
00 



1 
5 
5 

683 00 

14 78 

100 00 



$750 00 
312 53 



$1,062 53 



$1,062 53 



Election Expenses, Pay of Election Officers. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes. 1905 .... 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 

i, I ■ 

DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid election officers . . ' . 



$2,164 00 
11 00 

$2,153 CO 
$2,153 00 



Election Expenses, Registrars of Voters. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 .... 
Excess and Deficiency account^ balance transferred 



$1,550 00 
83 7!> 



$1,633 7.9 



03 



AK^KUAL KEPOBTS. 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Charles P. Lincohi, salary as reg- 
istrar 

Charles E. Parks, salary as registrar 
Levi F. S. Davis, salary as registrar 
George I. Vincent, salary as registrar 
Frederic W. Cook, salary as registrar 

disbursements .... 
Charles G. Brett, clerical services . 
George E. Davis, clerical services . 
Frank E. Merrill, clerical services . 
Fred E. Warren, clerical services 
Howard E. Wem3^ss, clerical services 
Alice M. Vincent, clerical services . 
Lawrence S. Howard, clerical services 
McGrath & Woodley, binding . 
Thomas Groom & Co., book . 
John Donnelly & Sons, posting 
Somerville Journal Co., printing 
Wesley A. Maynard, advertising 
Allen, Doane & Co., rubber caps 
John F. Kelley, serving notice . 
P. F. Tierney, serving notice . 
Edgar H. Pierce, serving notice 



$200 00 

200 00 

200 00 

19 65 

177 

2 



98 
55 



39 00 
39 00 
30 00 



6 
57 

9 



00 
00 
48 



12 00 
64 35 
11 75 
30 00 
503 00 
32 00 
1 25 

1 40 

2 28 
2 10 



$1,633 79 



Electrical Department. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 .... 
Sewers Construction account, amount transferred 
Excess and Deficiencv account, balance transferred 



$7,000 00 
700 00 
337 ;5 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of Welch & Hall, horse 
D. F. McNeil, moving wire 



$40 61 
12 00 



$8,037 75 



52 61 



$8,090 36 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Edward Backus, salary as super- 
intendent of electric lines and lights . 
Laborers ....... 

J. A. & W. Bird & Co., electrical sup- 
plies 

Clifton Mfg. Co., electrical supplies 
Chandler & Farquhar, electrical supplies, 
S. H. Couch Co., Inc., electrical supplies, 
W. E. Decrow, electrical supplies . 
Couch & Seeley Co., electrical supplies . 
Electric Gas Lighting Co., electrical sup- 
plies 

Amount carried forward .... 



$1,300 00 
3,849 88 


54 05 

7 18 

6 02 

123 00 

480 75 
9 30 


15 13 



$5,845 31 



APPENDIX TO TEEASUREE AXD COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 

Amount brought forward . 
F. M. Ferrin, electrical supplies 
T. W. Gleeson, electrical supplies . 
F. W. Kimball, electrical supplies . 
Pettingell-Andrews Co., electrical sup 

plies 

William Hall & Co., hardware . 

Underbill Hardware Co., hardware . 

W. E. Plumer & Co., hardware 

I. H. Wiley & Co., hardware . 

D. J. Bennett, harness work . 

Fellows & Co., harness work . 

C. W. H. Moulton & Co., repairing 

ladder 

J. Rush Green, spruce 
J. A. Kiley, repairing buggy, etc. . 
Charles E. Berry, repairing wagons 
Charles E. Perry & Co.. register paper 
Francis H. & Charles W. Boyer, repair 

ing fire whistle .... 

Murphy Varnish Co., varnish . 
A. J. Wilkinson & Co., letters and tape 
Cornelius Callahan Co., lantern holder 
John T. Sellon, fire box glasses 
A. D Wheeler, N. E. Agent, posts, etc. 
Julian D'Este Co., composition . . 5 72 

Thomas Groom & Co., stationery . . 2 50 

L. C. Smith & Brother, typewriter 

ribbon . 75 

Somerville Journal Co., printing 

Somerville Post-oftice, postage 

New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service 

Howard Lowell & Son. carriage hire 
Puritan Brewing Co., steam for fire 

alarm whistle 

A. G. Renner, expressing . 
American Express Co., expressing . 
Glines & Co., expressing . 



$5,845 31 


443 96 


38 


13 


17 


50 


304 


74 


8 


84 


112 


60 


5 


70 


55 


00 


76 


90 


1 


QS 


2 


50 




'/5 


102 


70 


6 


00 


56 


60 


27 


45 


24 


00 


6 


23 


4 


50 


11 


25 


440 


00 



Fire Department, board of horses 



7 00 
4 00 


118 50 
17 60 


40 00 

1 10 

55 

30 


$7,790 36 
300 00 



$8,090 36 



Excess and Deficiency. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 . 

DEBIT. 

Balance from 1904 



$45,510 00 



$45,509 IP 



Balance brought down 



CREDIT. 

Balance from 1904 

City Auditor, balance of 1905 account . 
City Clerk, balance of 1905 account 
City Engineer, balance of 1905 account 

Amount carried forward 



$0 81 

$0 81 

16 02 

412 95 

13 53 



$443 31 



64 



A>TNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward 
City Treasurer, balance of 1905 account 
Contingent Fund, balance of 1905 account 
Election Expenses: — 

City Clerk, balance of 1905 account 

Election Officers, balance of 1905 account 
Executive Department, balance of 1905 account " 
Fire Department, Combination Ladder and Chemical En 

gine, balance of 1905 account . 
Health Department, balance of 1905 account 
Highways, Removal of Brown-tail Moths, balance of 1905 

account 

Highways, Shade Trees, balance of 1905 account 

Highways. Watering Streets, balance of 1905 accoun 

Interest, balance of 1905 account 

Military Aid, balance of 1905 account 

Police, balance of 1905 account . . . . 

Printing and Stationery, balance of 1905 account 

Public Buildings Construction, Health Department 

balance of 1905 account .... 
Public Buildings Maintenance: — 

City Hall, balance of 1905 account . 

Health Department, balance of 1905 account 

Highways, balance of 1905 account . 

Police, balance of 1905 account . 

Public Grounds, balance of 1905 account 

Public Library, balance of 1905 account . 

Sewer Department, balance of 1905 account 
Public Grounds, balance of 1905 account 
Redemption of Tax Liens, balance of 1905 account 
School Teachers' Salaries, balance of 1905 account 
Sealer of Weights and Measures, balance of 1905 account 
Sewers Maintenance, balance of 1905 account 
Sidewalks Maintenance, balance of 1905 account 
Street Lights, balance of 1905 account .... 
Support of Poor, Miscellaneous, balance of 1905 account 

Balance to credit of account, 1906 



DEBIT. 

Assessors, balance of 1905 account . . $81 31 

City Messenger, balance of 1905 account . Ill 78 

City Solicitor, balance of 1905 account . 44 09 

Election Expenses: — 

Commissioner of Public Buildings, balance 

of 1905 account . . . . . 312 53 
Registrars of Voters, balance of 1905 ac- 
count . 83 79 

Electrical Department, balance of 1905 ac- 
count 337 75 

Fire Department, balance of 1905 account . 2,823 87 

Health Department, Collection of Ashes and 

OiTal, balance of 1905 account . . 11,228 79 
Inspection of Buildings, balance of 1905 ac- 
count 46 95 

Amount carried forward .... $15,070 86 



$443 31 
818 25 
123 60 

430 01 

11 00 
54 6] 

150 00 
8,041 9S 

44 80 

14 

7 32 

11.770 67 

191 57 

658 31 

40 95 

10 21 

356 ol 
110 70 
110 06 
512 92 

63 36 
810 78 

43 78 

12 64 
21 00 

5.325 .^8 

6 78 

1 72 

6 95 

109 11 

820 04 

$31,109 06 

5,496 14 

« 

$25,612 92 



APPENDIX TO TREASUEEK AND COLLECTOB's EEPORT. 65 



Amount brought forward .... $15,070 86 

Public Buildings Maintenance: — 

City Hall Annex, balance of 1905 account, 
Fire Department, balance of 1905 account. 
Janitors' Salaries, balance of 1905 account, 
Schoolhouses, balance of 1905 account 
Support of Poor, balance of 1905 account, 
Water Department, balance of 1905 ac- 
count 

School Contingent, balance of 1905 account. 

Soldiers' Relief, balance of 1905 account 

Support of Poor, City Home, balance of 



1905 account 



41 


10 


482 


37 


741 


25 


3,351 


18 


484 36 


6 


74 


1,264 81 


3,408 


13 


762 


12 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Hon. Leonard B. Chandler, 
salary as mayor ..... 
Fred E. Warren, secretary to the mayor, 
Samuel Ward Co., stationery . 
Underwood Typewriter Co., supplies 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service 

Somerville Journal Co., printing 
W. A. Greenough & Co., directory . 



$2,500 00 

1,200 00 

13 46 

2 00 


81 68 

44 75 

3 50 



Fire Department. 



CREDIT. 



$25,612 92 



Excise Tax. 

CREDIT. 

Cash, received of sundry persons $223 01 

DEBIT. 

Balance to credit of account, 1906 $223 01 



Executive Department. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 $3,900 00 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . . 54 61 



$3,845 39 



$3,845 39 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 $3,535 00 

Water Works Income account, amount appropriated . 61,465 00 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred , . 2,823 87 



Stock and labor billed other departments: — 
Electrical Department, board of horses , . , , 300 00 



$67,823 87 
300 00 
$68,123 87 



GG 



A:bfK^UAL EErOBTS. 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid James R. Hopkins, salary as chief 

engineer ..... 

Edward W. Ring, assistant engineer 
Permanent firemen and substitutes . 
Calhnen: — 

Steamer Co. No. 1 

Steamer Co. No. 2 

Steamer Co. No. 4 

Hose Co. No. 2 

Hose Co. No. 3 

Hose Co. No. 5 

Hose Co. No. 6 

Hose Co. No. 7 

Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1 

Hook and Ladder Co. No. 2 
Fulton O'Brion, hay and grain, $L251 27 

21 



Hobart S. Palmer, hay and grain . 
Proctor Brothers, hay and grain 
Nathan Tufts & Sons, hay and grain 
Lord & Webster, hay and grain 
F. C. Dinsmore, hay and grain 
M. F. Wilbur, oil meal . 
Charles E. Berry, horseshoeing 
J. H. Edwards, horseshoeing . 
George W. Ladd, horseshoeing 
Edward O'Brien, horseshoeing 
Pearl-street Shoeing Forge, horseshoeing 
W. H. Richardson, horseshoeing 
J. B. Rufer, horseshoeing . 
J. H. Thompson, horseshoeing 
L B. Walker, horseshoeing 
Jameson Brothers, horseshoeing 
George McDormand, horseshoeing . 
Everett E. Onley, horseshoeing 
Harry Tobin, horseshoeing 
Joseph A. Cribby, salary . 
Frank P. Merrill Co., horse medicine 
William H. Hitchings, veterinary ser- 
vices , 

Charles R. Simpson, veterinary services, 

C. H. Paine, condition powders 
Ame & Co., standard food 
Welch & LLall, horses 

D. J. Bennett, harness work . 
H. S. Harris & Sons, horses and har 

ness work .... 

D. McDonald, harness work . 
H. O. Austin, harness work 
H. A. Brownell, harness work 
Ferd. F. French & Co., concord wagon 
Charles E. Berry, repairing wagons 
Hale & Mayhew Co., repairing wagons 
J. A. Kiley, repairing wagons . 

Amount carried forward . 



$2,000 00 

880 39 

36,842 70 

1,517 76 

1,408 22 

1,383 50 

1,397 50 

1,293 69 

'1,382 00 

817 57 

797 50 

2,102 78 

2,093 50 



1.251 06 

418 44 

1,321 78 

902 98 

76 90 

7 53 

n^ 
H) 

39 92 

174 05 
84 90 
88 60 
69 50 
43 15 

453 70 
38 75 

157 75 

19 90 

m 15 

7 95- 

47 10 

100 00 
19 50 

56 00 

145 00 

10 00 

16 25 

822 61 

244 15 

890 00 

34 50 

12 90 

2 95 

155 00 

456 67 

373 05 

370 60 

$62,897 15 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



687 35 


24 


75 


12 


50 


1 


75 


15 


00 


7 


10 




80 




50 


24 45 



3 90 
45 71 



Amount brought forward .... $62,897 15 
Firestone Tire & Rubber Co., repairing 

wagons ..... 
L. A. Wright, repairing wagons 
Joseph Palmer, repairing wagons 
Frank W. Leavitt, repairing wagons 
Charles Waugh & Co., springs 
Joseph Breck & Sons, grindstone 
H. Wood, repairing tools . 
William G. Martin, repairing tools 

E. Teel & Co., repairing apparatus 
Crosby Steam Gage & Valve Co., re 

pairing apparatus 
Edward Kendall & Sons, repairing appa 

ratus 

Welch, Dwyer & Grady, repairing appa 

ratus 

F. W. Kimball, repairing apparatus 
M. C. Short Plumbing Co., repairing ap 

paratus 

Charles L. Underbill, repairing appa 

ratus 

Standard Extinguisher Co., fire extin 

guisher 

American La France Fire Engine Co. 

freight, etc 

George N. Wood & Co., strikers 

F. W. Barry, Beale & Co., stationery 

"Fire & Water Engineering," subscrip 

tion 

Little, Brown & Co., law books 

W. A. Greenough & Co., directories 

E. B. Wadsworth, directory 

Somerville Post-office, postage 

Smith-Premier Typewriter Co., supplies 

Somerville Journal Co., envelopes . 

Frank G. Macomber, insurance 

Mrs. M. E. Calvert, washing . 

Mrs. I. C. Jackson, washing 

Mrs. W. Loveland, washing 

Mrs. Helen R. Stevens, washing 

Mrs. E. F. Trefren, washing . 

A. M. Spike, washing 

Jackson Caldwell & Co., blankets . 

E. W. Ring, custodian 

J. A. Durell, hardware 

W. E. Plumer & Co., hardware 

E. S. Sparrow & Co., hardware 

Underbill Hardware Co., hardware 

Whitney & Snow, hardware 

Frederick C. Babson, dusters . 

D. J. Green & Co., brooms and brushes 

Murphy, Leavens & Co., brooms and 

brushes 

J. L Holcomb Mfg. Co., brooms and 

brushes 

William A. Haskell, mops 
Boston Woven Hose & Rubber Co., hose, 
The Cornelius Callahan Co., hose . 
Henry K. Barnes, hose .... 

Amount carried forward . . • . $65,635 42 



419 55 


1 55 


3 00 


1 65 


50 00 


150 24 


10 00 


25 20 


3 00 


6 00 


10 50 


3 50 


6 00 


6 30 


3 50 


8 26 


154 69 


129 00 


48 00 


49 36 


38 49 


34 00 


5 00 


72 00 


16 84 


10 16 


19 49 


22 85 


19 80 


3 83 


34 85 


67 15 


36 00 


11 50 


158 40 


96 30 


178 50 



OS 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 
Boston Coupling Co., hose 
William S. Howe, hose . 
Boston Belting Co., hose . 

John L. Crafts, canvas apron, etc 
Combination Ladder & R. I. Coupling 

Co., acid receptacles ... 
Philadelphia Flexible Metal Tubing Co 
tubing 
. Winter Hill Ice Co., ice 

Cambridge Ice Co., ice 

Boston Ice Co., ic^e . 

Fresh Pond Ice Co., ice 

Wellington-Wild Coal Co., fuel 

George W. Norton, soap . 

G. F. Whitney & Co., soap 

George William Waite & Co., soap . 

Sayman's Remedy Co., soap . 

Armour & Co., soap .... 

George Reichard & Sons, soap powder 

Eastern Oil & Gasolene Supply Co., oil 

Robert Hull, oil . . . . 

Kimball, Harrington & Osborne, engine 
oil 

W. H. Bullard, supplies 

George W. Butters, calendar 

F. E. Fitts Mfg. & Supply Co., packing 

Empire Palm Oil Co., polish .^ 

J. Wesley Edmonds & Son, polish . 

P. Sutherland & Co., polish 

L. W. Stone, polish .... 

Winchester Tar Disinfectant Co., disin 
fectant 

Knox & Morse, disinfectant 

C. W. Lerned, disinfectant 

R. G. Perkins, medicine . 
Henry D. Padelford, medicine . 
• George W. Cutter, liniment 
J. G. Leseur, liniment 
George E. Grover, supplies 
J. Hurd Brown, lubricant . 
Eastern Drug Co., drugs . 
Matheson Alkali Works, ext. soda . 
Vulcan Chemical Co., enamel . 
Boston Regalia Co.. insignia . 
C. A. Taylor, insignia 
The Mitchell Mfg. Co., badges . 
Cairns & Brother, repairing hats 
Scoville Mfg. Co., buttons . 
C. W. H. Moulton & Co., step ladders 
Hill & Hill, scrapers and snaps 
S. D. Hicks & Son, brass and labor 
Harry A. Glazier, nickel plating 
Oliver Whyte & Co., galvanized baskets 
L. A. Wright, connecting rod . 
J. B. Rufer, iron work 
Stack & Torrey, steam fitting . 
S. C. Baxter, boiler inspection 
Robb-Mumford Boiler Co., repairing 
boiler, etc. . . . . 

Amount carried forward '* '. . 



$G5,635 42 
665 50 

7 00 
84 62 
55 75 

30 00 

14 02 

6 00 

38 50 

n 40 

33 22 
69 30 
18 90 



4 

17 

3 



80 
47 
00 



45 00 

10 67 

7 80 

100 54 



9 00 

24 85 

50 



10 



01 
75 



14 31 



50 
40 



13 80 

6 25 

25 00 

11 20 



11 
4 



20 

00 



18 00 
90 

5 00 
49 94 
70 56 

8 50 

19 86 

3 75 
22 75 

5 15 

16 88 

153 30 

22 96 

4 98 
10 00 
54 00 

1 50, 

59 70 

1 60 

5 00 

137 52 



$67,728 53 



APPENDIX TO TEEASUEEK AND COLLECTOE S EEPOET. 



69 



Amount brought forward . 

C. F. Mills, carpentering . 

Howard Lowell & Son, horse food . 

Charles T. Garland, teaming . 

M. G. Staples, teaming 

Rufer & Creamer, use of horses 

Francis Carney, killing cow 

New England Telephone & Telegrapl 
Co., service ..... 

American Express Co., expressing . 

Glines & Co., expressing . 

E. R. Perham, expressing . 

Gilman Express Co., expressing 

Cotter's Express, expressing 
* Hall's Somerville Express, expressing 



$67,728 53 




3 75 


, 


68 00 




11 00 




4 00 




12 50 




25 00 




225 73 




14 58 




23 78 




1 50 




2 90 




1 80 




80 






$68,123 87 



Fire Department, Combination Ladder Truck 
and Chemical Engine. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1904 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid C. N. Perkins Co., combination wagon 



$2,500 00 
150 00 

$2,350 00 
$2,350 00 



Funded Debt. 



CREDIT. 



Funded Debt, as stated January 1, 1905 

Issue of 1905:— 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 3310 to 3427 
Sewer Loan Bonds Nos. 329 to 358 



Bonds matured in 1905: — 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 1674 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 1900 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 2132 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 2294 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 2427 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 2556 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 2674 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 2802 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 2914 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3028 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3190 
City Loan Bond No. 3198 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 1221 
City Loan Bonds Nos. 3152 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 64 

Amount carried forward 



$], 498,500 00 



$118,000 00 
30,000 00 





JL.-tU,\J\J\J UV 




$1,646,500 00 


DEBIT. 




to 1679 


$6,000 00 


to 1917 


18,000 00 


to 2139 


8,000 00 


to 2302 


9,000 00 


to 2436 


10,000 00 


to 2563 


8,000 00 


to 2685 


12,000 00 


to 2809 


8,000 00 


to 2923 


10,000 00 


to 3037 


10,000 00 


to 3197 


8,000 00 




500 00 


to 1223 


3,000 00 


to 3153 


2,000 00 


• 


1,000 00 



$113,500 00 



ANNUAL KEPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 181 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 205 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 227 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 256 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 280 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 304 
Sewer Loan Bond No. 47 
Sewer Loan Bonds Nos. 110 to 113 
Paving Loan Bonds Nos. 61 to 65 
Water Loan Bond No. b456 . 
Water Loan Bonds Nos. 353 to 355 
Water Loan Bonds Nos. 452 to 453 
Metropolitan Park Assessment Loan 
Bond No. 3 



Present Funded Debt, balance of account 



$113,500 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1 000 00 
4,000 00 
5,000 00 
1,000 00 
3,000 00 
2,000 00 

1,000 00 

$136,500 00 
1,510,000 00 



$1,646,500 00 



Grade Crossings. 



CREDIT. 



Sewers Construction account, amount transferred 
Balance to credit of account, 1906 .... 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Frank W. Kaan, services as spe- 
cial counsel $256 48 

Laborers 266 22 



Health Department. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 . 

Amounts transferred and unused: — 

Amount transferred to Public Buildings 
Construction, Health Department ac- 
count 

Amount transferred to Health Department, 
Collection of Ashes and Offal account. 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance 
transferred 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of J. E. Richardson, milk in- 
spector's fees 

William P. Mitchell, permits to keep 
swine ....... 

City of Boston, care of patients 



$1,500 00 
977 30 

$522 70 



$1,200 00 

24,000 00 

8,041 98 



$115 10 

66 00 
331 92 



$522 70 



39,500 00 



33,241 98 

$6,258 02 



Amounts carried forward 



$513 02 



.258 02 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



7i 



Amounts brought forward . 
E. Zetterman, care of patients . 



DEBIT. 

' (Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Caleb A. Page, salary as in- 
spector ...... 

Sundry persons, burying dead animals 

Charles M. Berry, salary as inspector of 
animals and provisions . 

fumigating, etc 

Julius E. Richardson, salary as milk in 
spector ...... 

Frank L. Morse, M. D., salary as bac 
teriologist 

A. P. Rockwood, board of horse 

E. F. Benson, repairing regenerator 

William G. Martin, repairing regen 
erator 

Melvin & Badger, regenerator and re 
pairing 

Eimer & Amend, electrical supplies 

Charles H. Cutter, repairing motor . 

Milton H. Plummer, drugs 

New England Vaccine Co., vaccine 
points ...... 

C. H. Goldthwaite & Co., vaccine . 

W. H. Broderick, medical attendance 

Whitali, Tatum Co., corks, etc. 

Fox, Fultz & Co., bottles and corks 

C. B. Berry, rubber gloves 
Allen Brothers, wax seal . 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 

D. J. Bennett, harness work 
I. L. Roberts, horseshoeing 
Harry Tobin, horseshoeing 
J. H. Atkinson, painting sleigh 
Allan Coughlan, repairing wagons . 
Cambridge Ice Co., ice . 
Thomas Groom & Co., stationery . 
Willard L. Clough, stationery . 
Somerville Post-office, postage 

rental 
Webcowit Press, printing . 
Somerville Journal Co., printing 
Wesley A. Maynard, printing . 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service 

Charles E. Parks, cleaning land 
City of Cambridge, care of patients 
City of Boston, care of patients 
City of Melrose, care of patients 
Charles D. Elliot, professional services 
Howard Lowell & Son, carriage hire 
American Express Co., expressing . 
Gilman Express Co., expressing 

E. R, Perham, expressing 



$513 02 
8 00 



6,258 02 
521 02 



$6,779 04 



$1,300 00 

133 50 

1,000 00 

28 20 

1,000 00 



933 28 

269 6(j 

16 00 


4 00 


71 90 
9 10 
3 00 
8 18 



1 80 
4 85 



8 00 


13 75 


10 27 


1 50 


1 25 


2 60 


5 65 


19 75 


4 25 


8 00 


29 81 


20 43 


60 95 


5 25 


24 00 


3 00 


94 50 


85 35 


6 00 


93 49 


4 00 


64 29 


, 1,168 00 


198 83 


50 00 


8 00 


4 20 


15 


30 



$6,779 04 



72 



ANNUAL REPOKTS. 



Health Department, Collection of Ashes and Offal. 

CREDIT. 

Amount transferred from Health Department account 
Amount transferred from Highways Maintenance account, 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . [ 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of sundry persons, ofTal 
A. M. Prescott, horse .... 

Stock and labor billed other departments 
Support of Poor, City Home account, ofTal 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Edgar T. Mayhew, salary as 
superintendent .... 

J. H. Thompson, board of horse, etc 

Laborers 

H. O. Austin, harness work 
D. J. Bennett, harness work 
Jerry Buttimer, use of teams . 
William J. McCarthy, use of teams 
T. Allen, use of teams 
I. B. Walker, horseshoeing 
J. B. Rufer, horseshoeing . 
J. H. Edwards, horseshoeing . 
George W. Ladd, horseshoeing 
George McDormand, horseshoeing 
Edward O'Brien, horseshoeing 
Hale & Mayhew Co., wagon repairs 
Charles L. Underbill, wagon repairs 
L. A. Wright, wagon repairs . 
Proctor Brothers, hay and grain 
Fulton O'Brion, hay and grain 
Nathan Tufts & Sons, hay and grain 
Hobart S. Palmer, hay and grain . 
Charles R. Simpson, veterinary services 
Welch & Hall Co.. horses 
Howard Lowell & Son, horse food . 
Henderson Brothers, sleigh 
Herbert L. Henderson, rods, etc., . 
J. A. Durell, tools and supplies 
Whitney & Snow, tools and supplies 
L. A. Wright, repairing tools . 
Highland Coal Co., cement 
Waldo Brothers, sewer pipe 
John Fischer & Co., offal tubs . 
Sulpho-Napthol Co., sulpho-napthol 
Boston Woven Hose & Rubber Co 

hose, etc. 

Herbert E. Bowman, supplies . 
Watts Rule Co., four-foot gauge 



$1,200 00 
289 45 

33,619 58 

25 71 

408 75 

68 00 
156 80 
256 50 
279 46 

4 00 

46 75 

83 00 

164 00 

263 29 

352 42 

11 15 

25 35 

2,233 55 

1,250 45 

517 50 

265 19 

69 25 
540 00 

10 00 

50 00 

22 50 

114 14 

55 85 

35 20 

2 30 

72 

21 60 

46 00 

47 10 
16 90 
>2 75 



$24,000 00 

• 4,000 00 

11,228 79 



$4,612 13 
30 00 


$39,228 79 

4,642 13 
212 73 


: — 



$44,083 65 



Amount carried forward 



$42,555 21 



APPENDIX TO TREASUEEK AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



7;i 



Amount brought forward . 
F. C. Ayer, lumber .... 
T. E. Littlefield, lumber . 
S. & R. J. Lombard Co., paving blocks 

offal driveway .... 

H. Gosse, moving offal office . 
C. F. Mills, labor on offal office 
Jackson Caldwell & Co., desk and chairs 

C. W. Cahalan, plumbing . 

Charles M. Berry, carriage hire and ex 
penses ...... 

Shepard, Clark & Co., sponges 

J. A. & W. Bird & Co.. flintkote . 

William Thumith, hauling ashes 

D. Wilson, teaming ashes . 
Jerry Buttimer, teaming . 
Arthur M. Berry, teaming 

J. H. Fannon, stone and teaming 

Thomas Groom & Co., stationery . 

New England Telephone & Telegrapl 
Co., service ..... 

Pettingell-Andrews Co., electrical sup- 
plies 

Glines & Co., expressing . 



Highways Maintenance account, labor and 
crushed stone 

Water Service Assessments account, laying 
water service ...... 



$42 


,555 


21 




114 44 




56 


67 




12 


00 




32 


00 




45 


00 




26 


00 




160 75 



12 65 
9 90 



46 80 


13 50 


9 00 


85 50 


144 80 


425 27 


12 30 



10 57 

13 12 
1 25 



$43,786 73 
.28 54 
268 38 



$44,083 65 



Highway Betterment Assessments. 



CREDIT. 



Cash, received of sundry persons 
Balance to debit of account, 1906 



$4,833 14 
5,152 78 

$9,985 92 



Balance from 1904 . 
Highways Construction, assess 
as follows: — 

Clarendon avenue 

Hawthorne street 

Josephine avenue 

Milton street 

Moreland street 

Pearl street 

Prichard avenue 

Richardson street 

Farragut avenue 

Haiison street . 

Ossipee road 



DEBIT. 


sments levied 


. $2,540 50 




488 92 




1,508 30 




207 99 




620 06 




235 98 




782 79 




171 70 




529 40 




217 89 




376 95 



$2,305 44 



7,680 48 



$9,985 92 



'^i ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Highways, Construction. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1904 $2,518 84 

Appropriations, from Funded Debt, 1905 . . . .* 20,000 00 
Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings account, amount 

transferred 10.000 00 

Sidewalks Construction account, amount transferred . . 5,000 00 
Public Buildings Construction, Addition to Bingham 

School account, amount transferred .... 14 96 

$37,533 80 
Amounts transferred and unused: — 

Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings 

account, amount transferred . . $2,500 00 

Sidewalks Construction account, amount 

transferred 1,500 00 

Public Buildings Construction, Dormitory 
at City Home account, amount trans- 
ferred 75 64 

Public Buildings Construction, Engine 
House in Ward Two account, amount 
transferred 263 18 

Public Buildings Construction. Proctor 
School Completion account, amount 
transferred ...... 1,029 16 

Public Buildings Construction, Rifle Range 
at Waltham account, amount trans- 
ferred . . 213 43 

Public Buildings Construction, Historical 
Building and Observatory on Pros- 
pect Hill account, amount transferred. 159 89 

Public Buildings Construction, Contagious 
Disease Hospital account, amount 
transferred 2,300 00 

Highways, Shade Trees account, amount 

transferred 200 00 

8,241 30 

$29,292 50 
Proceeds of sale of gravel land at Wakefield . . . 1,200 00 

Stock and labor billed other departments: — 
Highways; Maintenance account, stone . $4,244 92 

Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings 

account, blocks 221 39 

Sidewalks Construction account, paving 

blocks 4 88 

4.471 19 



Charged to Highway Betterment Assessments, assessments 

levied 7,680 18 

$42,644 17 
Balance of account unused, carried to 1906 .... 20 67 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid laborers $15,942 36 



$42,623 5x) 



Amount carried forward .... $15,942 36 



APPENDIX TO TREASUKER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



75 



Amount brought forward .... $15,942 36 
Warren Brothers Co., contract for con- 
struction 16,253 12 

Ham & Carter Co., bricks ... 6 05 

Boston Elevated Railway Co., bricks . 396 80 

S. & R. J. Lombard, edgestones . . 125 71 

C. W. DollofY, paving blocks . . . 477 18 

Frank Hervey, exploders, etc. . . 266 02 

William J. McCarthy, crushed stone . 96 91 

Jerry Buttimer, stone .... 62 42 

Wellington-Wild Coal Co., fuel . . 135 47 

Somerville Journal Co., advertising . 90 00 

Wesley A. Maynard, advertising . . 7 00 

T. Allen, tar and pitch .... 9 45 

Edwin O. Childs, Registrar, recording . 53 20 

Augustus S. Knight, land . . . 1,400 00 

Harlow H. Rogers, tax lien ... 30 31 

$35,352 00 
Highways Maintenance account, use of city 

teams and materials .... 7,112 79 

Sidewalks Maintenance account, bricks . 18 55 

Sewers Construction account, cement . . 70 73 
Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings 

account, paving blocks .... 69 43 



$42,623 50 



Highways, Maintenance. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts: 

Street Railway Tax . 

Boston Elevated Railway Tax 



$50,165 40 
8,107 66 



Health, Collection of Ashes and OfTal account, amount 
transferred 



Balance of account unused, carried to 1906 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of Joseph R. Baxter, ashes 
A. S. Colburn, labor . 
Horace W. Andrews, labor 
Horatio B. Ruggles, labor 
W. L. Snow, Inbor 
M. Q. Cook, labor . 
North Shore Express Co, labor 
George E. Gustin, labor . 
J. H. Fannon. horse, etc. 
A. M. Prescott, horse 
Warren Brothers Corporation, use 

roller .... 

Edwin A. Simonds, driveway 



$4 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


24 02 


4 


25 


14 65 


11 


64 


, -54 


50 


■ ■■ ■ ■ ■77 


50- 


531 


20 


11 


39 



$4,000 00 



58,273 06 

$62,273 06 

4,000 00 

$58,273 06 
4,646 56 

$53,626 50 



Amounts carried forward 



$758 15 $53,626 50 



76 



ANNUAL REPOBTS. 



Amounts brought forward .... 
Edison Electric Illuminating Co.. labor, 
Fred T. Ley & Co., crushed stone 
George H. Lowe, ashes 
Z. E. Cliff, labor 
J. E. Locatelli, driveway . 

J. C. H. Snow, labor 

Simpson Brothers Corporation, crushed 

stone 
Thomas Allen, ashes . 
Harry Gavell, labor . 
Joseph Gridley, driveway 
W. E. Dodge, labor . 
Boston Elevated Railway Co., part cos 

removing turnout .... 
Louisa Currell, resetting hitching post 
C. E. Parkhurst, labor 
Albert C. Ashton, labor . 
William P. DeWitt, labor. 
C. E. Egerton, labor .... 
Granville Hopkins, driveway . 
Martin W. Carr & Co., crushed stone 
Henry G. Lamburn, ashes 
William J. McCarthy, cruf-hed stone 
Julia A. McGlone, driveway 
Edw. J. Robertson, driveway . 
Albert Ober, driveway 
Charles H. Dearborn, driveway 
Winter-hill Baptist Church, driveway 
Charlestown Gas & Electric Co., use o 

roller 

Mary D. Wilder, discontinuing driveway 

Reginald W. Doe, driveway 

Elbridge G. Davis, driveway . 

Henry A. & Leona F. Hooper, driveway 

Frank A. Snow, labor 

John P. Squire & Co., driveway 

New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., use of teams .... 
T. H. Gill & Co., use of road roller 

Stock and labor billed other departments: 
Highways Construction account, teams 
Highways, Removing Brown-tail Moths ac- 
count, teams 

Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings 

account, teams 

Highways, Watering Streets account, teams, 
Highways, Shade Trees account, teams 
Support of Poor, City Home account, labor, 
Sidewalks Construction account, teams 
Health Department account, labor 
Sidewalks Maintenance account, teams 
Sewers Construction account, labor 
Sewers Maintenance account, labor . . , 
Public Grounds account, labor 
Public Buildings Construction. Engine 
House in Ward Two account, labor . 



$758 15 

39 00 

3 00 

18 00 

14 

5 



$53,626 50 



15 

00 



14 40 

25 38 

136 63 

2 25 

22 00 

10 40 

221 40 



50 
00 
25 

82 
00 



1 65 



17 
4 

5 
5 



00 

84 

00 

00 

6-00 

12 00 

24 68 

14 00 
5 00 
5 00 
9 85 

5 00 

6 80 
200 07 

676 75 
14 00 



$7,112 79 

201 60 

1,396 07 

84 00 

112 00 

8 00 

1,779 66 

28 54 

467 70 

223 54 

17 87 

55 28 

270 40 



$2,303 22 



11.757 45 



$67,687 17 



APPENDIX TO TEEASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



7r 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid laborers 

Asa Prichard, salary as superintendent 

of streets 

disbursements . . 
Eugene Mead, board of horse . 
Jerry Buttimer, stone 
Charles M. Berry, stone . 

C. W. Dolloff, stone .... 
J. F. Dwyer, stone .... 
S. & R. J. Lon-ibard, paving blocks . 
William H. Lenox, stone . 
William J. McCarthy, stone 
Massachusetts Broken Stone Co., stone 
J. O'Keefe, stone . . . . 

P. Penault. stone .... 

Herbert Nicoll, stone 

Waltham Trap Rock Co.. stone 

Ham & Carter Co., bricks 

N. T. Wiley & Co., repairing boiler 

Frank Hervey, forcite 

E. J. Hervey & Co.. forcite 

F. C. Ayer, lumber .... 
Davenport-Brown Co., lumber 
John M. Woods & Co., lumber 

T. E. Littlefield. lumber . 
Carlisle Ayer Co., windows and frames 
Lord & Webster, hay and grain 
Nathan Tufts & Son. hay and grain 
Gilmore Smith Co., hay and grain . 
Fulton O'Brion, hay and grain 
Proctor Brothers, hay and grain 
Hobart S. Palmer, hay and grain . 
Morgan & Bond, harness work 

D. McDonald, harness work 

W. H. Hitchings, veterinary services 

C, H. Paine, condition powders 

J. E. Richardson, bay mare 

Esau Cooper, horses .... 

W. C. Marston. horse 

George W. Ladd, horseshoeing 

Edward O'Brien, horseshoeing . 

L B. Walker, horseshoeing 

J. H. Edwards, horseshoeing . 

John B. Rufer, horseshoeing . 

George McDormand. horseshoeing . 

Hale & Mayhew Co.,, wagon repairs 

A. M. Wood Co., wagon repairs 

L. A. Wright, wagon repairs . 

J. L. & H. K. Potter, wagons and re 

pairs 

Joseph Palmer, wagon repairs . 

Walter W. Field, repairing road 

machines ..... 

Buffalo Steam Roller Co., repairing road 

machines ..... 

Good Roads Machinery Co., repairing 

road machines .... 

Amount carried forward . 



$40,024 66 

1,800 00 
1 40 

251 60 
282 74 

15 00 
17 20 
93 45 
63 9S 
34 80 
174 83 
146 63 

3 00 
10 05 
42 93 

1.244 99 

40 00 

13 50 
57 50 
23 00 

332 13 

56 

28 86 

27 01 

9 32 

252 16 
1.799 85 

182 32 

2.029 47 

1,536 55 

163 68 

752 25 

4 80 
156 00 

5 00 
100 00 
775 00 
190 00 

7 00 
110 75 

14 06 
25 
50 

3 51 
151 46 
628 26 

5 50 

197 00 
30 94 

225 41 

844 73 

21 70 

$54,927 29 



•^8 



AX^^ITAL EEPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 
Farrell Foundry & Machine Co., repair 

ing road machines . 
A. B. Black, Agent, plow, etc. 
Edson Mfg. Co., chain for sweeper 
J. E. Gallagher, bellows and anvil 
William B. Holmes, forge hood, etc 
Boston Broom Co., brooms and brushes 
T. A. Sallawaj^ brooms and brushes 
Dennison, Estabrook & Co., brooms 

and brushes 
T. A. Cunningham, brooms and brushes 
W. G. Hallock, brooms and brushes 
Murphy Varnish Co., paint 
1. H. Wiley & Co., paint . 
Waldo Brothers, cement . 
E. S. Sparrow & Co., hardware 
Underbill Hardware Co., hardware 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 
W. E. Plumer & Co., hardware 
J. A. Durell, hardware 
William J. Wiley, hose 
Dodge, Haley & Co., tools 
Perrin, Seamans & Co., tools 
Colonial Supply Co., tools 
Boston Bolt Co., bolts 
Osgood & Witherly, castings 
William G. Martin reoairing tools . 
A. F. Robinson Boiler Works, steel plate 
John W. Harmon, repairing levels . 
C. E. Berry, repairing tools 
George McDormand, repairing tools 
H. Wood, filing saws .... 
Russell Calk Sharpener Co., calk sharp 

eners 

Ashton Valve Co., repairing gauges 

C. W. Lerned & Co., disinfectant . 
Winchester Tar Disinfectant Co., disin- 
fectant 

W. W^ Rawson & Co., herbicide 
Cling Surface Co., polish . 
Thomas Hollis Co., drugs . . 
Herbert E. Bowman, drugs 
Chandler & Farquhar Co., waste 
Boston & Lockport Block Co., rope 
Charles A. Claflin & Co., oil . 
P. Sutherland & Co., oil . 
Valvoline Oil Co., oil ... 

J. -p. Squire & Co., salt . 

D. A. McKay & Co., salt . 
Thomas Groom & Co., stationery . 
A. C. Libby & Sons, stationery 
Steele & Nickerson, stationery . 

New England Telephone & Telegrapl 

Co., service 

Alice M. Vincent, typewriting report 
Allen, Doane & Co., stamps 
Wesley A. Maynard, advertising 
Somerville Journal Co., envelopes and 
printing 

Amount carried forward . . . . 



$54,927 29 

40 00 
150 50 

11 75 
10 00 
10 75 

12 00 
10 4b 

78 00 

4 40 
50 

261 44 

15 00 

14 72 

139 81 

130 00 

184 28 

39 

15 

3 50 

45 93 

97 00 

49 60 

2 00 

48 41 

2 60 
166 83 

5 00 

3 55 

4 68 
2 10 

224 20 

7 35 

22 50 

20 50 

80 

7 00 

14 40 

32 00 



103 
4 



70 
34 



22 73 

50 70 
89 31 



96 

36 



32 50 
24 99 

60 

70 04 
1 50 

4 90 

8 75 

30 75 
$57,221 52 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



tl) 



Amount brought forward . 
J. H. Fannoii, sand .... 
M. W. Carr & Co., sand . 
McLean Brothers, sand . 
WiUiam Smith, sand .... 
Henry G. Lamburn, sand . 
T. O'Keefe, sand .... 

John M. Riley, gravel 
W. B. Mullen, gfavel .... 
E. R. Dix, gravel ..... 
T. Allen, concreting .... 
S. H. Lewis, sods and loam 
Warren Brothers Corporation, grano 

lithic 

J. J. Fisher, pipe .... 

Highland Coal Co., pipe . 

J. Willard Jones, serving notices, hearing 

Lowell-street bridge 
Mary Callinan, settlement of claim foi 

injuries 

Mary E. Keene, settlement for injuries 
Mary,G. Byron, settlement of claim 
Margaret A. Newman, settlement o 

claim 

B. F. Freeman, photographs . 
E. C. Hartshorn, photographs . 
Bacon & Burpee, copies of hearings on 

Lowell-street bridge 
Town of Wakefield, taxes, 1903 
taxes. 1904 
Pettingell-Andrews Co., electrical sup 

plies ...... 

Boston & Maine Railroad Co., freight 
Roberts Iron Works Co., grates 
Charlestown Gas & Electric Co., lamp 

posts ...... 

Union Glass Co.. lantern globes 
Masten & Wells Fireworks Mfg. Co 

torches 

New York, Nea Haven & Hartford 

Railroad Co., freight 
J. W. Howard, flowers and plants . 
Wellington- Wild Coal Co., fuel 
Consumers' Coal Co., fuel 
Walter H. Snow, lunches . 
Goodwin & Rimbach, lunches . 
Jackson.Caldwell & Co., oil stove . 
Howard Lowell & Son, carriage hire 
J. Buttimer, teaming .... 
American Express Co., expressing . 
E. R. Perham, expressing 
Gilman Express Co.. expressing 
Glines & Co., expressing . 



Highways Construction account, stone 
Sidewalks Maintenance account, bricks 
Sidewalks Construction account, setting 
edgestones at Broadway terrace . 



$57,221 52 

11 50 

86 50 

110 00 

16 00 

49 50 
79 00 
15 38 

746 20 

50 00 
126 30 

6 31 

51 00 
1 61 
1 35 

43 00 



250 


00 


250 00 


75 


00 


250 


00 


22 


20 


16 


00 


194 60 


52 


83 


50 


18 


O 


14 


3 


48 


?6 


67 


56 


00 


18 


40 



1 50 



6 63 


19 63 


739 37 


791 63 


3 75 


12 00 


4 00 


42 00 


13 50 


8 25 


1 05 


25 


15 


$61,527 38 


4,244 92 


20 14 


1,363 09 



Amount carried forward 



$67,155 53 



$67,155 53 




281 27 




230 85 
16 39 




3 13 


$67,687 17 





SO ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amount brought forward .... 

Sidewalk Assessments account, sidewalk as- 
sessment 

Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings ac- 
count, paving blocks .... 

Sewers Construction account, cement , 

Water Maintenance account, repairing 
siphon 



Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Funded Debt account, 1905 . . $20,000 00 

Amount transferred from Highways Construction account, 2,500 00 

Stock and labor billed other departments: 
Sidewalks Maintenance account, bricks 
Highways Maintenance account, paving 

blocks 

Highways Construction account, paving 

blocks 

Cash, received of Barbara Galpin, round stone 

Amounts transferred and unused: — 
Highways Construction account, amount 

transferred 

Balance to credit of account, 1906 . 





$22,500 00 


$19 88 




230 85 




69 43 


320 J 6 
11 30 


2 . . . 




$22,831 46 


$10,000 00 
304 86 


10,304 Sij 





DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Balance from 1904 $2,062 41 

Cash, paid laborers 4,853 42 

C. W. Dolloff, paving stone . . . 1.880 10 

S. & R. J. Lombard, paving stock . . 1,776 46 

George W. Prichard, paving blocks . 27 00 

Metropolitan Paving Brick Co., bricks . 309 75 

$10,909 14 
Highways Maintenance account, use city 

teams • ^^^^^ ^' 

Highways Construction account, pavmg 

stock 221 39 



$12,526 60 



$12,526 60 



Highways, Paving Broadway, Bow and Summer Streets. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1904 $8,136 02 

Sewers Construction account, amount transferred . . 8,000 00 



$16,136 02 
Balance to credit of account, 1906 15,544 17 

$591 85 



APPENDIX TO TEEASUEER AND COLLECTOE's EEPOET. 81 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid Warren Brothers Co., contract for paving 

Highways, Removal of Brown=TaiI Moths. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 . 
Interest account, amount transferred ', 

Receipts: — 

Cash, received of sundry persons, removing moths from 

trees 

Stock and labor billed other departments:- 

Public Grounds account, removing moths 

Public Buildings Maintenance, Schoolhouses 
account, removing moths 

Support of Poor, City Home account, re- 
moving moths 



Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid laborers .... 
Edward O'Brien, horseshoeing 
A. P. Rockwood, sleigh 
Bowker Insecticide Co., creosote 
Whitney & Snow, oil and tools 
Bugbee & Barrett Co., tanglefoot . 
William G. Martin, sharpening saws 
Somerville Journal Co., stationery 
T. A. Cunningham, brushes 
Thomas Groom & Co., letter book 
Fellows & Co., ladders 
W. E. Plumer & Co., hardware 
Underbill Hardware Co., pruners 
H. Wood, springs, etc. 



$4,331 20 

3 50 

25 00 

36 75 

48 90 



00 
05 



35 00 
11 27 

2 75 
21 25 
37 19 
33 00 

3 20 



Highways Maintenance account, use city 
teams 



$4,594 06 
201 60 



$591 85 



. 


$3,000 00 
1,500 00 


1 


$4,500 UO 


moths from 


276 46 


$35 00 




21 50 




7 50 


64 00 




$4,840 46 
erred . . 44 80 



$4,795 66 



$4,795 66 



Highways, Shade Trees and Tree Guards. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Funded Debt, 1905 .... 
Amount transferred from Highways Construction account. 

Amount carried forward 



$1,400 00 
200 00 

$1,600 00 



82 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



Amount brought forward $1,600 00 

Receipts: — 

Cash, received of sundry persons, trees .... 151 95 

$1,751 95 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . . 14 



iO 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid laborers $681 

J. A. Durell, wire guards, etc. . . 189 00 

E. S. Sparrow & Co., netting, etc. . . 95 76 
Underbill Hardware Co., tape and 

staples 5 50 

F. C. Ayer, posts 172 13 

Bay State Nurseries, trees . . . 476 37 

Belmont Hill Nurseries, trees ... 10 50 
Boston & Maine Railroad, freight on 

trees 8 80 



$1,639 81 



Highways Maintenance account, use of city 

teams 112 00 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of abutters .... $46 00 

Sundry persons, insuring .... 64 00 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid laborers $1,902 05 

J. L. & H. K. Potter, repairing carts . 296 96 

Amount carried forward .... $2,199 01 



$1,751 81 



$1,751 81 



Highways, Thorndike Street Subway. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Funded Debt, 1905 .... $600 00 

Balance to credit of account, 1906 34 47 

$565 58- 

DEBIT. 

Balance from 1904 $565 58 



Highways, Watering Streets. 

CREDIT. 

Taxes, assessments levied $21,520 24 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . . 7 82 



$21,512 9^ 

110 00 
$21,622 92 



APPENDIX TO TEEASUEER AND COLLECTOE's EEPORT. 85- 



etc, 



ser 



Amount brought forward . 
Joseph Palmer, repairing carts 
Underhill Hardware Co., repairing carts 
Hale & Mayhew Co., repairing carts 
I. B. Walker, repairing carts . 
L. A. Wright, repairing carts . 
F. W. Burrell Sz Co., repairing carts 
T, Allen, pitch and gravel . 
Murphy Varnish Co., paints 
Edward O'Brien, horseshoeing 
A. M. Wood Co., repairing buggy, 
Morgan & Bond, harness . 
John M. Woods & Co., lumber 
William H. Hitchings, veterinary 

vices ..... 

Cornelius R. Bowlby, watering 
William F. Bennett, watering . 
Jeremiah Buttimer, watering 
Edward F. Caldwell, watering . 
Jackson Caldwell, watering 
George E. Carr, watering . 
John- F. Elkins, watering . 
James H. Fannon, watering 
Charles T. Garland, watering . 
William H. Libby, watering 
H. Lowell & Son, watering 
John A. Marsh, watering . 
George F. McKenna, watering 
Ellen McAvoy, watering . 
Henry J. McAvoy, watering 
JMichael J. McLaughlin, watering 
Albion M. Prescott, watering . 
Mark W. Patten, watering 
J. A. Porter & Co., watering . 
George W. Prichard, watering . 
Thomas F. Reardon, watering . 
Albert P. Rockwood, watering . 
John B. Rufer & Co., watering 
Mary J. Shean, watering . 
R. M. Sturtevant, watering 
Suburban Coal Co., watering -. 
David M. Smith, watering 
Frank A. Teele, watering . 
James H. Thompson, watering 
Edwin E. Whitehouse, watering 
Thomas Walsh, watering . 
Delia Wilson, watering 
Charles S. Robertson, insurance 
T. A. Cunningham, brushes 
S. Ward Co., book 
Loena A. Snowman, clerical services 
Eva V. Tukey, clerical services 
E. R. Perham, expressing . 



Highways Maintenance account, use of city 
teams . . . . . 

Assessors' account, clerical services 

Water Maintenance account, repairing stand- 
pipes 

Water Works Extension account, new stand- 
pipes 



$2,199 01 


39 47 


32 00 


62 91 


23 21 


12 00 


14 00 


40 17 


691 44 


25 00 


64 46 


20 00 


98 44 


4 00' 


618 50 


495 00 


425 00 


533 27 


573 00 


545 00 


554 27 


501 77 


564 77 


529 77 


622 00 


618 50 


618 50 


529 77 


425 00 


501 77 


644 00 


608 00 


547 27 


545 00 


520 50 


618 50 


615 00 


536 77 


611 50 


495 00 


597 50 


590 50 


547 27 


540 27 


543 77 


615 00 


63 00 


2 80 


14 50^ 


22 67 


12 00 


50- 


$21,273 32 


84 00 


70 67 


145 16 


49 77 



$21,622 92' 



'B4 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Inspection of Buildings. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 $4,050 00 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . . 46 95 



$4,096 95 



Receipts: — 

Cash, received of Walter T. Littlefield, plumbers' licenses, 22 50 

telephone tolls . $79 77 

79 77 $4,119 45 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Walter T. Littlefield, salary as 

commissioner of public buildings . . $1,900 00 

George H. Galpin, assistant to commis- 
sioner of public buildings . . . 800 00 

Duncan C. Greene, inspector of plumb- 
ing 

The Carter's Ink Co., typewriter ribbon, 

Thomas Groom & Co., stationery . 

A. C. Libby & Sons, stationery 

S. Ward Co., stationery .... 

Somerville Journal Co., printing 

William J. Hanson, lead pipe . 

New England Telephone & Telegraph 
Co., service 

W. A. Greenough & Co., directory . 

George F. McKenna, teaming . 

William S. Howe, solder .... 

W. E. Plumer & Co., hardware 



1,200 00 


1 00 


38 50 


1 25 


14 83 


65 60 


2 50 


86 09 


3 50 


3 00 


1 93 


1 25 



Amounts transferred and unused: — 
Police account, amount transferred . . $3,000 00 

Highways, Removal of Brown-tail Moths ac- 
count, amount transferred 
Interest credited Real Estate Liens 
Public Library, Isaac Pitman Fund, Income, 
Art account, balance of interest allowed 
on investment 



Receipts: — 
Imterest charged to Real Estate Liens 
Cash, received of sundry persons . 



$4,119 45 



Interest. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 $76,159 00 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . . 11,770 67 



$64,388 33 



1,500 00 
2 05 




39 89 


4,541 94 






$59,846 39 




1 32 


$10,906 18 
1 00 


10,905 18 





$70,752 89 



APPENDIX TO TEEASUEEE AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 85 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Coupons maturing April 1, 1905, $1,777 50 

Coupons maturing July 1, 1905, 25,115 00 
Coupons maturing October 1, 

1905 4,367 50 

Coupons maturing January 1, 

1906 22,807 50 



sh, paid interest on 


temporary loans: — 


On Note No. 


587, 


six 




months, $30,000 




^ 


$573 00 


On Note No. 


'586,* 


six 




months, $25,000 


, ' 


. 


477 50 


On Note No. 


585, 


six 




• months, $20,000 


, 




382 00 


On Note No. 


591, 


ten 




months, discount, $25,000 . 


712 50 


No Note No. 


584, 


six 




months, $25,000 


, 


, 


477 50 


On Note No. 


583, 


nine 




months, $50,000 






1,406 25 


On Note No. 


588,* 


six 




months, $50,000 


, 


, 


912 50 


On Note No. 


589, 


six 


■ 


months, $50,000 


, 


. 


912 50 


On Note No. 


584, 


four 




months, $25,000 




, 


318 38 


On Note No. 


585, 


four 




months, $20,000 






254 Q6 


On Note No. 


586, 


four 




months, $25,000 


. 


. 


318 33 


On Note No. 


587, 


four 




months, $30,000 


. 




382 00 


On Note No. 


590, 


ten 




months, $100,000 






2,708 33 


On Notes Nos. 592-3-4, 


eight 




months, $50,000 


each 




3,249 99 


On Note No. 


596, 


six 




months, $100,00C 




, 


1,800 00 


On Note No. 


597, 


six 




months, $100,000 


• 


1,800 00 



$54,067 50 



16,685 39 



$70,752 89* 



Metered Water Charges. 



CREDIT. 



Water Works Income account, abatements 

Receipts: — 
Cash, received of sundry water takers . 
Balance to credit of account, 1906 . 



DEBIT. 



Balance from 1904 . 

Last quarter, 1905, uncollected 



$14,658 38 
19,185 53 



$30 99 

14,628 83 
19,184 09 

$33,843 91 



$33,843 91 



86 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Military Aid. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 $1,100 00 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . .. 191 57 



Receipts: — 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 958 42 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid sundry persons as per pay rolls . $1,842 00 



F. G. Bartlett, board of Valentine E. 
Gilson . 24 85 



DEBIT. 



Taxes, amount of abatements, $12,660 26 
(Cash, $4.00) ... 5 72 



$12,654 54 



$908 43 
958 42 

$1,866 Sr) 



$1,866 85 



Overlay and Abatement. 

CREDIT. 

Taxes, amount of overlay from assessors' warrant . . $13,377 oS 
Amount of assessors' supplementary warrants, 1904 (cash), 19 62 

Amount of assessors' supplementary warrants, 1905 . . 2,055 30 

$15,452 to 
Costs credited to Real Estate Liens 33 24 

$15,419 26 
Balance to credit of account, 1906 2,546 09 



$12,873 17 



$12,873 17 



Cash, paid sundry persons, money refunded, 218 63 

•Overplus on Tax Sales* 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1904 $11S 13 

DEBIT. 

Balance to credit of account, 1906 $1^^ ^^ 

Police. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 ^^o'aaX aa 

Amount transferred from Interest account .... 3,000 00 

Amount carried forward r • $42,000 00 



APPENDIX TO TREASUKEE AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT, 



87 



Amount brought forward 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Receipts: — 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, corpora- 
tion tax, 1904 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, national 
bank tax, 1904 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, corpora- 
tion tax, 1905 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, national 
bank tax, 1905 

Cash, received of John R. Fairbairn, Master 
of House of Correction, fines 

Herbert A. Chapin, Clerk of the Courts, 
fines ....... 

Sundry persons, cloth for uniforms . 



$42,000 00 
658 31 





$41,341 69 


$893 99 




79 89 




24,741 13 




5,424 97 


31,139 98 




$678 00 




3,954 00 

486 81 


5,118 81 





$77,600 48 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Melville C. Parkhurst, chief 
lock-up keeper 
Robert R. Perry, captain 
Lieutenants: — 

Dennis Kelley 

Eugene A. Carter . 

Charles E. Woodman 
Sergeants: — 

Edward McGarr 

George H. Carleton 

Eugene H. Gammon 

James M. Harmon 
Inspector, Thomas Damer 
Patrolmen: — 

Phineas W. Skinner 

Albion L. Staples 

John E. Fuller 

Edward M. Carter . 

George L. Smith 

Francis A. Perkins 

William H. Johnston 

Jacob W. Skinner . 

Theodore E. Heron 

David A. Bolton 

Michael T. Kennedy 

Ira S. Carleton 

Charles W. Stevens 

Ezra A. Dodge 

James J. Pollard 

Daniel G. Simons . 

Samuel Burns 

Frederick H. Googins 

Jotham Chisholm 

Amount carried forward 



$1,900 00 


100 00 


1,500 00 


1,350 00 


1,350 00 


1,350 00 


1,200 00 


1,200 00 


1,176 90 


1,200 00 


1,150 00 


271 50 


271 50 


1,092 00 


1,089 00 


1,032 00 


1,068 00 


1,077 00 


1,095 00 


1,068 00 


1,083 00 


1,098 00 


1,074 00 


1,092 00 


1,092 00 


1,092 00 


1,092 00 


1,095 00 


1,095 00 


1,092 00 


$32,445 90 



88 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



imount brought forward . 








$32,445 90 


William J. Davidson 








1,092 00 


Elmer E. Drew 








1,035 00 


John A. Dadmun 








1,098 00 


Eugene A. Woodsum 








1,092 00 


George L. Rice 








1,092 00 


Myron S. Gott 








1,092 00 


John A. Ray . 








1,095 00 


Herbert Hilton 








1,092 00 


Charles W. Reick . 








1,065 00 


Charles E. Byrnes . 








1,098 00 


Frank C. Hopkins . 








1,062 00 


Charles W. Allen . 








1,098 00 


Hudson M. Howe . 








1,098 00 


Frederick J. Balcom 








1,092 00 


Ernest S. Goff 








1,095 00 


Sanford S. Lewis . 








1,095 00 


Frank H. Graves . 








1,071 00 


Henry A. Sudbey . 








1,056 75 


Harry L. Allen 








1,062 75 


Harvey R. Fuller . 








1,068 25 


William J. Sutherland . 








1,056 75 


Thomas F. McNamara . 








1,043 50 


Louis F. Arnold 








980 00 


Charles S. Johnston 








980 00 


George E. Reece 








273 25 


James M. Lynch 








910 00 


Martin Sharry 








912 50 


Henry Y. Gilson 








912 50 


Reserve: — 










Robert T. Blair 








912 50 


Ernest Howard 








910 00 


George A. C. Peters 








905 00 


Lemuel J. Simonds . 








910 00 


Edmund J. Keane . 








912 50 


Claude L. Grossman 








905 00 


Dennis Neylon 








635 00 


John J. Cummings . 








637 50 


Dennis Downey 








630 00 


Edward M. Davies . 








540 00 


Drivers: — 










Judson W. Oliver . 








910 00 


Edward E. Ware 








821 25 


Frederick G. Jones . 








819 00 


Martin E. DriscoU . 








184 50 


Retired list (half pay) : — 










John Hafford . 








478 50 


George W. Bean 








546 00 


Phineas W. Skinner 








409 50 


Albion L. Staples . 








409 50 


Special patrolmen: — 










James E. Phillips . 








430 00 


David J. Hannah 








422 50 


Dennis J. Mulqueeney 








322 50 


Patrick H. Ryan 








45 00 


Peter J. Savage 








7 50 


Othniel M. Pote 








7 50 


Peter Savage . 








2 50 


Frank O, Downer . 








10 00 



Amount carried forward 



$74,887 40 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



8^ 



Amount brought forward . 

Theron H. Kingsley 

John H. Kelley 

Robert C. Brown 
Sundry persons, services at polls 
Gertrude A. Bauer, matron 
Minnie Woodland, matron 
Thomas Damery, disbursements 
Eugene A. Carter, disbursements 
F. W. Hopkins, disbursements . 
Dennis Kelley, disbursements . 
L. H. Snow, committing prisoners . 
Patrick J. Garvin, committing prisoners 
Jotham Chisholm, disbursements 
George H. Carleton, disbursements . 
Frank C. Hopkins, disbursements . 
J. A. Marsh, hay and grain 
Proctor Brothers, hay and grain 
Fulton O'Brion, hay and grain 
Nathan Tufts & Sons, hay and grain 
Hobart S. Palmer, hay 
Ira L. Roberts, horseshoeing 
E. F. Carl, harness work . 
D. J. Bennett, harness work 
A. P. Rockwood, storage . 
L. H. Brown, carriage hire 
Charles W. Dailey, use of ambulance 
C. H. Paine, condition powders 
Thomas Hollis Co., insect powder . 
Idella A. Taylor, washing . 
American Towel Supply Co.., towels 
J. H. Brooks, supplies 
Fresh Pond Ice Co., ice . 
Lawrence M. Peirce, M. D. V., profes 

sional services 

Loring H. Raymond, M. D., professional 

services 

Mary McEachern, food for prisoners 

R. M. Sturtevant & Co., supplies 

Whitney & Snow, hardware 

Hobbs & Warren Co., stationery 

M. L. Vinal, stationery 

Henry Barrett, photographs 

George O. W. Servis, photographs . 

C. M. Blake, daily papers . 

J. H. Padgett, printing 

Somerville Journal Co., printing 

New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service 

Underwood Typewriter Co., supplies 

The Frank Shepard Co., law books . 

Little, Brown & Co., law books 

W. A. Greenough & Co., directory . 

Allan Coughlan, repairs . . . 

Harper & Herman, repairing chairs 

Lovett, Hart & Phipps Co., police cloth 

Raphael Masstrangialo, helmets, etc. 

Allen Brothers, badges 

Thomas W. Talcott, service stripes . 

Amount carried forward 



$74,887 40 

3 75 

10 00 

7 50 

166 00 

17 50 

197 50 

127 67 

129 79 

124 20 

14 00 

12 85 

3 45 

10 41 

6 41 

3 06 

68 32 

37 41 

71 82 

23 20 

9 54 

83 75 

9 00 

30 65 

20 00 

56 00 

4 

2 

3 



00 
00 
00 



52 79 

48 00 

6 00 

32 33 

5 00 

6 00 
59 75 
37 78 
35 50 
42 57 

4 80 
71 00 
15 00 
14 60 

2 75 
102 50 

197 74 

3 00 
1 00 

4 50 
10 50 

7 25 
7 00 

466 99 

61 50 

10 15 

3 75 



$77,449 93 



dO 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 
Scoville Mfg. Co., buttons 
Union Glass Co., lanterns . 
Charles E. Berry, repairing handcuffs 
Eugene Mead, carriage hire 
George F. McKenna, carriage hire , 
J. H. Thompson, use of horse . 
R. G. Perkins, use of horse 
Elmer E. Drew, use of horse . 
American Express Co., expressing . 
A. M. Prescott, expressing 
Thorpe's Express, expressing . 



$77,449 93 

13 50 

6 00 
2 25 

10 00 
15 00 

14 00 

7 00 
76 00 



50 

00 
30 



$77,600 48 



Powder House Boulevard. 



CREDIT. 



Amount transferred from Prospect-hill Park, Completion 

account $369 30 



DEBIT. 



(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid laborers 

Waldo Brothers, drain pipe 

James Tevlin, teaming . . . . 



$295 00 

5 60 

68 70 



$369 30 



Printing and Stationery ( Public Documents and 
Stationery for Board of Aldermen ). 



CREDIT, 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 .... 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



DEBIT. 

Cash, paid Somerville Journal Co., printing 
annual reports, etc. 
J. A. Cummings Printing Co., registers 
Thomas Groom & Co., stationery . 
Somerville Post-office, postage 
George H. Walker & Co., maps 
George O. W. Servis, photographs . 



$2,000 00 
40 95 

$1,959 05 



$1,671 70 




176 00 




7 35 




18 00. 




76 00 




10 00 






$1,959 05 


- 



Property and Debt Balance, 



CREDIT. 



Balance from 1904 

Public Property, property acquired in 1905 
Funded Debt, bonds matured . 



$2,327,600 14 

75,575 58 

136,500 00 



$2,539,675 72 



APPENDIX TO TEEASUKER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



91 



DEBIT. 



Funded Debt, issue of 1905 
Balance to credit of account, 1906 



$148,000 00 
2,391,675 72 



$2,539,675 72 



Public Buildings Construction, Addition to 
Bingham School. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Funded Debt, 1905 

Amount transferred to Highways, Construction account 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Balance from 1904 

Cash, paid John E. Locatelli, carpentering . 
Walsh Brothers, masonry . . . . 
J. J. Hurley & Co., retubing boiler, re- 
pairing radiator, etc 

Kenney Brothers & Wolkins, school fur- 
niture ....... 



$596 93 

142 75 

2 40 

125 96 

117 00 



$1,000 00 
14 96 

$985 04 



$985 04 



Public Buildings Construction, Contagious 
Disease Hospital. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Funded Debt, 1905 .... 
Amount transferred from Highways Construction account. 



Balance to credit of account, 1906 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Balance from 1904 

Cash, paid McLean Brothers, on account of 

contract 

William J. Wiley, steamfitting and 

plumbing 

■Walsh Brothers, contract for masonry . 
George A. Teel, Guardian, interest on 

purchase of land . . . 
Jennie P. Russell, interest on purchase of 

land ....... 

B. L. Makepeace, drawing material . _ . 
Wadsworth, Howland & Co., stationery . 
J. H. Fannon, teaming .... 

Charles A. Kelley, laying drain 
H. G. White, electric work 



$100 00 


3,092 50 


197 54 

675 00 


63 00 


37 00 
6 66 
8 87 
12 50 
39 40 
55 00 



$5,000 00 
2,300 00 

$7,300 00 
3,012 53 

$4,287 47 



$4,287 47 



92 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Public Buildings Construction, Dormitory at 
City Home. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1904 

Appropriations, from Funded Debt, 1905 .' .* 
Highways Construction account, amount transferred 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid WilHam B. Mackay, on account of 

contract 

constructing cesspool . 

B. L. Makepeace, blue prints . 

C. W. Cahalan, steamfitting 
Charles H. Sanborn, heating contract 
Pratt Construction and Engineering Co. 

masonry and placing boiler . 
A. H. Hines, masonry 
F. A. Harmon, painting and bronzing 
Benjamin R. Twombly, painting 
C. F. Mills, carpentering . 
Charles A. Rounds, electric work 
Pettingell-Andrews Co., electrical sup 

plies 

W. E. Plumer & Co., hardware 
Charles E. Shaw, hanging wall paper 



$325 00' 


30 00 


1 60' 


193 59 


250 00^ 


252 62 


25 03 


16 45 


32 65 


24 75 


83 00 


8 63 


22 50 


20 04 



$210 22" 

1,000 00 

75 64 

$1,285 86 



$1,285 8(>- 



Public Buildings Construction, Engine House 
in Ward Two. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Funded Debt, 1905 .... 
Amount transferred from Highways Construction account, 



$3,000 Ot> 
263 18 

$3,263 18 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Balance from 1904 .... 

Cash, paid F. C. Alexander, masonry 
J. E. Gallagher, digging . 
Herbert L. Henderson, gratings 
H, G. White, electric fixtures . 
Charles E. Berry, labor and hardware 
Patrick Burke, work on lawn . 



Highways Maintenance account, labor, 
gravel, etc. 



$1,717 37 
848 25 

6 38 
130 00 
135 39 
150 39 

5 00 

$2,992 78 
270 40 



$3,263 18- 



APPENDIX TO TEEASUREE AND COLLECTOE'S EEPOET. 



93 



Public Buildings Construction, Health Department. 

CREDIT. 

Amount transferred from Health Department account 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid Arthur W. Berry, on account of 

contract 

C. W. Cahalan, plumbing .... 

Simpson Brothers Corporation, laying 
floor ....... 

J. H. Fannon, concrete walk 



$879 39 
24 06 

193 00 
93 34 



$1,200 00 
10 21 

$1,189 79 



$1,189 79 



Public Buildings Construction, High School Building. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Funded Debt, 1905 

Balance to credit of account, 1906 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid F. C. Alexander, on account of 

contract 

Arthur W. Berry, carpentering contract, 
F. O. Johnson, plumbing . 
C. W. Cahalan, plumbing . 
B. L. Makepeace, blue prints 
E. S. Runyan, drawing 
Aaron H. Gould, contract plans 
Slade & Crawford, making specifications, 
Thomas McNee, roofing . . . . 
James A, Houston, shades . $48 50 
(cash) .... 6 00 



George O. W. Servis, photographs 

A. A. Sanborn, steamfitting 

H. G, White, electrical work . 

E. S. Sparrow & Co., hardware 

G. A. Walker, painting 

Allen, Totman & Co., slating, etc. 



$12,146 90 


1,825 00 


516 53 


31 53 


1 44 


25 00 


800 32 


30 00 


8 20 


42 50 


2 25 


759 78 


163 96 


41 58 


50 45 


92 00 



$40,000 00 
23,462 5G 

$16,537 44 



$16,537 14 



Public Buildings Construction, Historical Building 
and Observatory on Prospect Hill, 

CREDIT. 

Amount transferred from Highways Construction account, 

DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
■Cash, paid Austin Ford & Son, settlement of suit 



$159 89 



$159 89 



94 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Public Buildings Construction, Luther V. Bell 
School Fire Escapes. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1904 

Balance to credit of account, 1906 . . . . 



DEBIT. 



(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid Lombard Fire Proofing Co., first 
payment on account of contract . 
Charles F. Mills, carpentering 
F. C. Ayer, lumber 



$1,500 00" 
734 81 



$765 19: 



$660 00 




58 50 




46 69 






$765 19 





Public Buildings Construction, Proctor School 
Completion. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1904 

Appropriations, from Funded Debt, 1905 .... 
Amount transferred from Highways Construction account, 



$24,414 80- 

10,000 oa 

1,029 16 
$35,443 96. 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid John E. Locatelli, on account of 

contract 

Aaron H. Gould, services as architect 
Alexander Duncan & Co., on account of 

contract 

C. W. Cahalan, plumbing . 

William J. McCarthy, foundation for 

porch 

Simpson Brothers Corporation, laying 

asbestolith floors .... 
N. E. Marble & Mosaic Co-operative 

Co., granite cc>mposite . 
George F. McKenna & Son, teaming 
William J. McCarthy, teaming, etc. 
E. S. Sparrow & Co., hardware 
H. G. White, electrical work . 
American School Furniture Co., fur 

niture 

Jackson Caldwell & Co., furniture . 

Kenney Brothers & Wolkins, furniture 

Charles F. Mills, repairing furniture 

James H. Houston, shades 

H. E. Carlisle, mats . . . • 

E. Howard Watch & Clock Co., oak 

clocks 

J. H. Kelley, cleaning windows 



$25,091 35 
200 51 

3,600 00 
2,187 11 

293 50 

57 00 

630 00 
192 50 
134 50 
553 72 
138 00 

1,256 85 

299 50 

534 45 

30 75 

95 00 

17 22 

120 00 
12 00 



$35,443 96 



APPENDIX TO TEEASUEEK AND COLLECTOE S EEPOET. 



95. 



Public Buildings Construction, Rifle Range 
in Waltham. 

CREDIT. 

Amount transferred from Highways Construction account, 



DEBIT. 

Balance from 1904 

Cash, paid Charles F. Mills, carpentering 

H. G. White, electrical supplies 

G. F. McKenna, teaming . 



$213 43 



$193 21 




15 00 




3 22 




2 00 






$213 43 






PubUc Buildings Maintenance, City Hall. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 .... 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of J. J. Morrow, old carpet . 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Jackson Caldwell & Co., carpet, 

etc. . $375 01 

Gracey & Weir, cleaning carpet . . 13 19 
Sanitary Dust Removing Co., cleaning 

carpets 87 50 

W. W. Calkin, repairing chairs ... 4 12 

William F. Eccles, repairing furniture . 26 50 

Derby Desk Co., chair iron ... 2 50 

Charles Gale, repairing furniture . . 4 90 

D. W. Webster, repairing furniture . , 2 65 
Kenney Brothers & Wolkins, waste 

baskets 23 00 

Davenport, Brown & Co., shelves, etc. . 34 48 

Charles F. Mills, carpentering ... 43 50 

J. C. H. Snow, carpentering , . . 39 77 

Thomas McNee, repairing roof . . 11 25 

The Mosler Safe Co., safe .... 244 00 
Damon Safe & Vault Engineering Co., 

repairing vault , 29 65 

W. E. Plumer & Co., hardware . . 7 60 

E. S. Sparrow & Co., hardware . . 5 93 
Whitney & Snow, hardware ... 27 15 
Underbill Hardware Co., hardware . . 3 83 

H. Wood, lock work 12 95 

Lumsden & Van Stone Co., gaskets . 2 68 
Electric Gas Lighting Co., electrical sup- 
plies 14 81 

McKenney & Waterbury Co., supplies . 7 33 

Fred W. Farrar, repairing clock . . 1 50 



$3,000 00 
356 01 

$2,643 39 

1 50' 

$2,644 8^ 



Amount carried forward 



$1,025 80 



m 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 
John H. Kelley, repairing radiator . 
William S. Howe, galvanized iron . 

F. O. Johnson, plumbing . 
J. F. Davlin, plumbing 

A. A, Sanborn, fittings 

James Bartley, soap and matches 

American Chemical & Dyestuff Co., dis 

infectant . r . . . . 
Co-Tar-O Remedy Co., disinfectant 

G. A. Walker, varnishing . 
W. J. Fermoyle, painting . 

L. E. Clayton, cloth .... 

William J. Wiley, brushes and dusters 

T. A. Cunningham, brush .... 

Murphy, Leavens & Co., brushes 

Victoria Specialty Co., carpet sweeper 

Amelia H. Wood, repairing flag 

Daniel J. Campbell, labor . 

Jim Hodder & Bros., towels 

M. A. Mann, laundering 

Cambridge Ice Co., ice . . . 

Pettingell-Andrews Co., desk portable 

Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas . 

Gas Consumers' Association, regulation 

Wellington-Wild Coal Co., fuel 

Edison Electric Illuminating Co., light- 



ing. 



Consumers' Coal Co., fuel 
G. F. McKenna, teaming 



$1,025 80 


12 50 


3 25 


50 54 


42 50 


90 


7 30 


12 50 


7 50 


3 50 


8 13 


43 


57 50 


50 


32 36 


3 75 


1 00 


3 00 


4 00 


30 00 


33 54 


3 75 


5 30 


2 00 


169 98 


1,022 36 


96 50 


4 50 



$2,644 89 



Public Buildings Maintenance, City Hall Annex. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 .... 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 

DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid John H. Kelley, steamfitting 
Isaac Coffin & Co., pipe fittings 
Clifford & Rogers, shades . 
Doten-Dunton Desk Co., oak chair 
C. F, Mills, carpentering . 
Charles Gale, carpentering 
F. E. Seavey, roofing . 
Wallburg & Woehrn, painting . 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 
W. E. Plumer & Co., hardware 
Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection & In 

surance Co., insurance . 
Wellington-Wild Coal Co., fuel 
Consumers' Coal Co., coal 
Edison Electric Illuminating Co., light 

ing 

Amount carried forward 



$5 50 


66 


14 70 


7 00 


18 75 


70 


6 60 


25 00 


1 47 


2 70 


50 00 


89 63 


77 20 


67 74 



$450 00 
41 10 

$491 10 



$367 65 



APPENDIX TO TEEASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



97 



Amount brought forward . 
George F. McKenna & Son, teaming 
Frank A. Teele, wood 
J. J. Hurley & Co., repairing radiator 
D. P. Bucknam, masonry . 



$367 65 

75 

3 25 

83 65 

35 80 



$491 10 



Public Buildings Maintenance, Fire Department. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 .... 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 

DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid F. C. Ayer, lumber 
T. E. Littlefield, lumber . 
John M. Woods & Co., lumber 
Davenport-Brown Co., lumber 
W. P. Rice, lumber 
C. F. Mills, carpentering . 
F. C. Alexander, sheathing 
Stack & Torrey, plumbing 
James W. O'Neil, plumbing 
J. A. Durell, plumbing 
H. W. Covell, plumbing 
H. M. Hunnewell, plumbing 
James F. Davlin, plumbing 
A. A. Sanborn, steamfitting 
M. F. Naughton & Co., steamfitting 
William S. Howe, furnace work 
William P. Young, furnace work 
Osgood & Witherly, fire grates 
Pierce, Butler & Pierce Mfg. Co., grate 
John H. Kelley, repairing boiler 
Charles E. Berry, fittings for apparatus 

room 

John B. Rufer, bolts .... 
W. A. Snow Iron Works, brass posts 
. E. S. Sparrow & Co., hardware 
W. E. Plumer & Co., hardware 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 
William J, Wiley, hardware 
Benjamin R. Twombly, painting 
LeBaron Emery, painting 
Pittsburg Plate Glass Co., glass 
C. W. Hughes, glass .... 
S. & R. J. Lombard, flagging . 
P. Bowdren, care of lawns 
William J. McCarthy, grading lot . 
T. F. McGann & Sons Co., bronze tablet 
William A. Bertsch, removing granite 
W. E, Bucknam, masonry ... 
George W. Manning, splicing halyards 
Boston Spar Co., work on flagstaff . 

Amount carried forward . . . , 



$5,000 00 
482 37 



$28 90 


9 53 


81 39 


15 27 


6 16 


215 62 


140 50 


15 43 


32 90 


2 15 


15 80 


11 95 


6 55 


52 55 


12 40 


14 97 


18 76 


5 00 


1 30 


2 50 


216 34 


4 50 


126 50 


16 54 


56 42 


19 05 


7 00 


2 96 


5 50 


1 17 


2 50 


46 80 


5 00 


156 13 


127 00 


35 00 


3 00 


28 50 


55 00 



$5,482 37 



$1,604 54 



98 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . . . . 
Broad Gauge Iron Works, brass fittings 

for flagstaff .... 
Amelia H. Wood, repairing flag 
George E. McKay, flagstaff 
George O. W. Servis, photographs 
Caleb P. Bucknam, decorating . 
Jackson Caldwell & Co., shades 
J. J. Hurley & Co., tubes, etc. . 
H. G. White, electrical supplies 
Pettingell-Andrews Co., electrical 

plies 

H. Wood, repairing lock . 
Thomas Dowd, mortar, etc. 
Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas 
Charlestown Gas & Electric Co., ga 
Wellington-Wild Coal Co., fuel 
Edison Electric Illuminating Co., 1 

ing . . , . 
Consumers' Coal Co., fuel 
Frank A. Teele, wood 
G. F. McKenna & Son, teaming 



$1,604 54 





2 75 




1 00 




50 00 




2 00 




16 00 




43 25 




9 00 




72 00 


sup- 






5 22 




25 




10 00 




92 12 




59 40 




1,357 92 


iight- 






1,611 80 




510 12 




32 50 




2 50 



$5,482 37 



Public Buildings Maintenance, Health Department. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 .... 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of W^ B. Mackay, rent 



$345 00 
110 70 

$234 80 

210 00 

$444 30 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid C. W. Cahalan, plumbing . 

Simpson Brothers Corporation, asphalt 
base 

E. S. Sparrow & Co., hardware 
William J. Wiley, hardware 
William B. Mackay, carpentering 
C. F. Mills, carpentering _ . 
James Kenney, carpentering 
Arthur W. Berry, carpentering . 
T. E. Littlefield, lumber . 

F. C. Ayer, lumber . 
WelHngton-Wild Coal Co., fuel 
Consumers' Coal Co., fuel . 
Edison Electric Illuminating Co., hght 

ing . . . . .• 
B. L. Makepeace, blue prmts . 



$3 85 



45 00 


8 31 


92 41 


6 50 


36 01 


5 60 


9 00 


6 85 


60 75 


44 80 


11 94 


112 16 


1 12 



$444 SO 



APPENDIX TO TEEASUEEE AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 99' 
Public Buildings Maintenance, Highways. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred ! '. 

Receipts: — 
Cash, received of Arthur Murley, rent . . $120 00 

Thomas Ormand, rent .... 120 00 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid J. A. Durell, repairing stove 

William J. Wiley, plumbing 

F. O. Johnson, plumbing . 

C. W. Cahalan, cleaning drain . 

E. S. Sparrow & Co., hardware 

S. W. Fuller, lumber . 

C. F. Mills, carpentering . 

Davenport-Brown Co., milling . 

Wellington- Wild Coal Co., fuel 

Consumers' Coal Co., fuel . 

Edison Electric Illuminating Co., light- 
ing . . . . 

Electric Gas Lighting Co., supplies 

Pettingell-Andrews Co., electrical sup 
plies 



$8 25 


6 35 


5 05 


2 50 


12 75 


176 94 


27 00 


56 


61 78 


12 4a> 


111 16 


2 21 


2 99 



$300 00 
110 06 



$189 94 



240 00 



$429 94 



$429 94 



$26,000 00 

741 25 

26,741 25^ 



Public Buildings Maintenance, Janitors' Salaries. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . 

DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid janitors' salaries 

Public Buildings Maintenance, Police. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 $1,100 00 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . . 512 92 



26,741 25 



$587 08 
Receipts : — 
Cash, received of J. O. Hayden, county treasurer, rent of 

court room 600 00 



$1,187 08 



100 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid William S. Howe, furnace work, 
Lumsden & Van Stone Co., gaskets 

C. A. Slager, carpentering 
G. D. B. Robinson, carpentering 
James F. Davlin, plumbing 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 
W. E. Plumer & Co., hardware 

'Charles Gale, repairing chair . 

D. P. Bucknam, masonry . 
G. A. Walker, glazing 
P. Bowdren, care of grounds . 
Murphy, Leavens & Co., brushes 
Frank A. Teele, wood 

'C. W. Lerned & Co., disinfectant 
West Disinfectant Co., disinfectant 
Winchester Tar Disinfectant Co., disin 

fectant 

R. M. Sturtevant & Co., matches 

Continental Grate Co., box for grate 

A, F. McMillan, repairing heater 

■G. F. McKenna & Son, teaming 

Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas . 

Gas Consumers' Association, regulation 

Wellington-Wild Coal Co., fuel 

Consumers' Coal Co., fuel 

Edison Electric Illuminating Co., light 

ing .^ 

American Express Co., expressing 



$6 80 


1 78 


9 61 


1 98 


3 30 


27 77 


1 50 


1 40 


. 8 10 


4 20 


1 25 


34 00 


6 50 


37 00 


21 50 


10 00 


90 


2 10 


7 90 


1 50 


366 40 


18 00 


367 97 


102 00 


143 12 


50 



$1,187 08 



iPublic Buildings Maintenance, Public Grounds. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 .... 
-Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
'Cash, paid George W. Manning, lowering 

flagstaff 

Arthur C. Gordon, glazing 

J. A. Durell, hardware .... 

Wellington- Wild Coal Co., fuel 



$5 00 


8 60 


64 


22 40 



$100 00 
63 36 

$36 64 



$36 64 



Public Buildings Maintenance, Public Library. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 .... 
•Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



$4,000 00 
810 78 



^3,189 22 



APPENDIX TO TEEASUKEK AND COLLECTOK'S KEPORT. 101 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Paine Furniture Co., furniture 
McLean Brothers, cabinet, etc. 
Clifford & Rogers, shades and cord 
Underhill Hardware Co., hardware 
T. A. Cunningham, brushes 
WilHam Hall & Co., turnstiles . 
Hurley & Cannon, steanifitting 
J. J. Hurley & Co., repairing radiator 
G. W. Manning, repairing roof 
W. W. Calkin, carpentering 

C. F. Mills, carpentering . 
Charles Gale, carpentering 
T. E. Littlefield, lumber . 
Davenport-Brown Co., lumber 
Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection & In 

surance Co., insurance >. 

D. P. Bucknam, masonry . 
H. Wood, repairing lock . 
Louis Bell, electrical services 
Pettingell-Andrews Co., electrical sup 

plies .... 

C. A. Southwick, extra services as janitor 
Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas 
Wellington-Wild Coal Co., fuel 
Consumers' Coal Co., fuel . 
Edison Electric Illuminating Co., light 

ing 

Frank A. Teele, wood 

E. R. Perham, expressing 
American Express Co., expressing 



$7 00 


282 60 


6 25 


1 83 


95 


295 00 


6 50 


27 99 


2 50 


68 77 


13 50 


2 80 


2 40 


1 21 


50 00 


12 50 


40 


75 00 


1 10 


24 00 


46 60 


368 49 


77 20 


1,809 73 


3 25 


50 


- 1 15 



$3,189 22 



Public Buildings Maintenance, Schoolhouses. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 .... 
Amount transferred from Contingent Fund . 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of Walter T. Littlefield, tele- 
phone tolls .... 
E. P. Fitzgerald, rent 
Walter Turner, rent . 
H. B. Sellon, gas 
George F. Clark, old furniture . 
Frank M. Hawes, broken glass 
J. B. Burke, use of schoolroom 



Stock and labor billed other departments 
School Contingent account, extra service . 



$25,000 00 
1,300 00 
3,351 18 





$29 

1 


,651 IS 


$79 77 






7 00 






3 00 






56 10 






15 00 






2 00 






3 00 




165 87 


— 




8 85 



$29,820 90 



102 



ANNUAL REPOKTS. 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid John H. Adcock, plumbing 
Armstrong Brothers, plumbing 
Andrews & Andrews, plumbing 
C W. Cahalan, plumbing . 
Edwin Connell, plumbing 
James F. Davlin, plumbing 
F. O. Johnson, plumbing . 
M. F. Naughton & Co., plumbing 
James W. O'Neil, plumbing 
J. E. Parsons, plumbing . 
M. C. Short Plumbing Co., plumbing 
Alex. Duncan & Co., steamfitting 
J. A. Durell, steamfitting . 
William S. Howe, steamfitting . 
John H. Kelley, steamfitting . 

A. A. Sanborn, steamfitting 

B. F. Sturtevant & Co., steamfitting 
George A. Weld Co., steamfitting 
Isaac Coffin & Co., steamfitting 
Powers Regulator Co., steamfitting 
Charles H. M. Hunnewell, steamfitting 
Roberts Iron Works Co., repairing 

boiler $201 93 

18 60 



Walsh Brothers, repairing boiler 
William B. McKenna. repairing boiler 

C. L. Underbill, repairing boiler 

J. J. Hurley & Co., repairing boiler . 
H. M. Hunnewell, gasfitting 
.Stack & Torrey, gasfitting 
L. A. Wright, iron work . 
J. B. Rufer, iron work 

A. F. McMillan, furnace work . 
Continental Grate Co., furnace work 
Somerville Iron Foundry, furnace work 

D. P. Bucknam, mason work . 

E. Home, mason work 

B. E. Higgins, mason work 
John Kennedy, mason work 
A. H. Hines, mason work . 

F. S. Dickinson, mason work . 

E. B. Price, mason work . 
W. E. Bucknam, plastering 
Thomas Dowd, repairing ceiling 

T. Allen, concreting . . . . 
James Higgins, sodding and grading 
P. Bowdren, care of grounds . 
George W. Manning, repairing flagstaff 
Amelia H. Wood, repairing flags . 
Davenport-Brown Co., lumber 
T. E. Littlefield, lumber 

F. C. Ayer, lumber . 
Wilbur P. Rice, lumber . 
W. W. Calkin, carpentering 
Charles Gale, carpentering 

Amount carried forward 



$68 12 

37 60 

122 63 

2 95 
20 80 

9 69 
95 71 

34 07 

35 78 
75 

3 15 
162 56 
299 16 
254 67 
153 25 
301 77 
199 48 

28 18 

23 42 

39 65 

149 02 



183 33 

20 75 

140 75 

1 75 

88 82 

1 37 

7 58 

8 00 
1 10 

86 73 

9 42 
. 8 00 

503 56 

28 05 

4 50 

49 19 

91 38 

7 50 

7 50 

4 00 
3 15 

63 oa 

75 00 

197 00 

49 15 

5 00 
26 61 
21 89 

5 02 

3 89 

56 70 

44 80 

$3,846 90 



appe:n^dix to teeasueee and collectok's report. 103 



Amount brought forward . 
Hemeon Brothers, carpentering 
James Kenney, carpentering 

C. F. Mills, carpentering . 
L. A. Penney, carpentering 
J. C. H. Snow, carpentering 
Trueman H. Thorpe, carpentering 
Harris P. Tibbetts, carpentering 
W. L. Waugh, carpentering 
Sylvester Woods, carpentering 
Thomas McNee, goofing . 
S. P. Larsen, roofing . 
Murphy Varnish Co., varnish 
Mrs. C. H. Sanborn, fence 
S. H. Davis & Co., hardware 
A. J. Wilkinson & Co., hardware 
W. E. Plumer & Co., hardware 
E. S. Sparrow & Co., hardware 
T. A. Sallaway, hardware . 
Underbill Hardware Co., hardware 
William J. Wiley, hardware 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 
S. A. Bernard, painting . 
Cutler-Marshall Co., painting 
Ernest W. Flagg, painting 

D. O'Connell, pamting 
J. A. Stevens, painting 
W. J. Fermoyle, setting glass 
Benjamin R. Twombly, setting glass 
G. A. Walker, setting glass 
R. C. Burckes, setting glass 
Pittsburg Plate Glass Co., glass 
J. A. Bremner & Co., repairing wa 
A. C. Gordon, sign and plan . 
O. M. Gracey, tubes and labor . 
House Cleaning Co., cleaning . 
Lever Brothers Co., soap powder 
H. James & Son, soap 
Solshine Mfg. Co., polish . 
Armour & Co., soap . 
Gibson Soap Co., polish . 
J. E. Post, brooms and brushes 
T. A. Cunningham, brooms and brushes 
P. Sutherland & Co., oil . 
H. W. Burgess, oil . 
Robert Hull, oil . 
Borne Scrymser Co, oil . 
J. Wood, oil ... 

E. & F. King Co., soda ash 
L. Ryan, sawdust 
E. S. Kearney, sawdust 
Tar-O Remedy Co., disinfectant 
American School Furniture Co., furni 

ture 

Jackson Caldwell & Co., furniture 
Clififord & Rogers, furniture 
Kenney Brothers & Wolkins, furniture 
Osborn Furniture Co., repairing furn 

ture 

Amount carried forward 



$3,846 90 

9 75 

86 80 

356 30 

26 71 

83 88 

17 03 
14 22 

6 70 
32 80 
79 03 

7 95 
48 00 
23 94 

90 

1 00 

151 27 

195 02 

12 25 
306 08 

93 87 
144 39 

19 95 
212 00 

8 40 
16 50 

5 03 

18 70 
5 65 

28 10 

7 00 

37 67 

205 00 

31 05 

5 00 

13 00 



50 
50 



21 60 
96 94 



50 
75 
30 



61 60 
2 60 

22 65 
4 75 

42 00 

14 71 
1 00 

28 75 

15 00 

284 00 

121 05 

22 90 

678 40 

1 50 



$7,597 84 



104 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 

Fred R. Rogers, repairing furniture 

George M. Wadsworth, repairing furni- 
ture 

D._ W. Webster, repairing furniture 

William F. Eccles, upholstering, etc. 

Fibre Specialty Co., chair bottoms . 

Edw. J. Young, furniture moving . 

Allen-Totman Co., ink wells and sup 
plies 

Blodgett Brothers, repairing clocks 

F. W. Farrar, repairing clocks . 

G. Taylor, repairing clocks 
George L. Janvrin, repairing clocks 
Frederick R. Cutter, repairing clocks 
H. Wood, repairing locks . 
William G. Martin, repairing locks . 
William J. Wiley, repairing locks . 
Lumsden & Van Stone Co., gaskets 

H. W. Johns-Manville Co., pipe covering 

Cunningham Iron Co., plates, etc. . 

Hodge Boiler Works, plates 

Johnson Service Co., valve 

T. F. Welch & Co., valve stem 

T. F. Dame, janitor's services . 

Clarence N. Richardson, janitor's ser 

vices 

Joseph Young, janitor's services 
Penrose Thomas, janitor's services . 
William F. McKenna, janitor's services 
J. F. O'Brien, janitor's services 
Sanitary Dust Removing Co., cleaning 

carpets 

E. O. Arnold & Co., laying carpets . 
Waldo Brothers, sand, lime, etc. 
Somerville Journal Co., printing and 

stationery 

Henry A. Wheeler & Co., ensigns . 
Howard Lowell & Son. board of horses 
George McDormand, horseshoeing . 
J. E. Richardson, veterinary services 
D. J. Bennett, strap .... 
G. F. McKenna & Son, teaming 
W. H. Wood, teaming 
Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection & In 

surance Co., insurance . 
Herbert Jay, rent of hall . 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service 

H. G. White, electrical work . 
Pettingell-Andrews Co., electrical sup 

plies 

Frank A. Teele, wood 
Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas 
Charlestown Gas & Electric Co., gas 
Electric Gas Lighting Co., supplies . 
Gas Consumers' Association, gas regula 

tion 

Wellington-Wild Coal Co., fuel 



$7,597 84 

4 30 

6 80 

7 60 
50 00 

8 14 
37 00 

112 31 
'11 31 

27 00 

2 75 

3 00 
10 50 

14 95 

1 00 

2 00 
72 39 

6 58 
348 46 

1 52 
49 25 

3 90 
47 00 

28 00 
28 75 

6 00 
22 00 

2 25 

16 60 
30 05 

5 05 

32 50 

58 29 
300 63 

17 00 

7 35 

50 

141 75 

1 00 

150 00 
70 00 

501 16 

15 70 

8 06 
131 40 
645 10 
459 20 

41 81 

32 00 
13,086 00 



Amount carried forward 



$24,263 75 



APPENDIX TO TKEASUEEK AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 105 



Amount brought forward . . . . 
Consumers' Coal Co., fuel 
Edison Electric Illuminating Co., light- 
ing _ 

American Express Co., expressing . 
Glines & Co., expressing . . • . 



Highways, Removing Brown-tail Moths ac- 
count, removing moths .... 

Sewers Maintenance account, repairing 
sewer 



$24,263 75 
2,541 13 


2,905 14 
4 80 
1 00 


$29,715 82 


21 50 


83 58 



29,820 90 



Public Buildings Maintenance, Sewer Department. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . 

DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid F. C. Ayer, lumber 
C. F. Mills, carpentering , 
Wellington-Wild Coal Co., fuel 
Consumers' Coal Co., fuel . 
G. F. McKenna & Son, teaming 



$1 


55 


3 00 


19 


20 


5 


97 


1 


50 



$75 00 
43 78 



$31 22 



$31 22 



Public Buildings Maintenance, Support of Poor. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 .... 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of William B. Mackay, rent . 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid C. W. Cahalan, plumbing . 
A. F. McMillan, repairing furnace . 
J. H. Kelley, repairing boiler . 
E. S. Sparrow & Co., hardware 
William J. Wiley, hardware 
Charles H. M. Hunnewell, steamfitting 
Harris P. Tibbetts, carpentering 
William B. Mackay, carpentering . 
Charles F. Mills, carpentering . 
W. P. Rice, lumber . •. . . 

Amount carried forward 



$245 02 


43 31 


3 25 


12 75 


8 97 


28 61 


11 52 


165 56 


8 25 


7 54 



$800 00 
484 36 



$1,284 36 

35 00 

$1,319 36 



$534 78 



106 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 
T. E. Littlefield, lumber 
Carlisle Ayer Co., window 
Thomas Dowd, plates, etc. 
Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas 
Wellington-Wild Coal Co., fuel 
Consumers' Coal Co., fuel . 
Edison Electric Illuminating Co., light 
ing 



$534 


78 




81 


1 


25 


15 


70 


"6 


60 


421 


77 


127 44 


211 


01 



$1,319 30 



Public Buildings Maintenance, Water Department. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . 



$300 00 
6 74 

$306 74 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Henry A. Wheeler & Co., en- 
signs .... 

John M. Woods & Co., lumber 

T. E. Littlefield, lumber . 

Charles F. Mills, carpentering 

William J. Wiley, paint . 

George F. McKenna & Son, teaming 

Wellington-Wild Coal Co., fuel 

Consumers' Coal Co., fuel . 

Edison Electric Illuminating Co., light 
ing 



$5 25 


44 05 


4 48 


17 25 


2 15 


1 50 


99 16 


19 30 


113 60 



$306 74 



Public Grounds. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 .... 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Receipts: — 
Sidewalk assessment abated and returned . 
Cash, received of William A. McLean, lawn 

mower 

Somerville High School Athletic Associa- 
tion, additional seats for grand stand . 
grading 



$1 00 

400 00 
52 53 



Stock and labor billed other departments: 
Sewers Maintenance account, labor, etc. 



$10,500 00 
12 64 

$10,487 36 

12 41 



453 33 
45 00 



$10,998 30 



APPENDIX TO TREASUKER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 107 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid laborers 

Arthur C. Gordon, signs and irons . 

I. B. Walker, iron work . 

L. A. Wright, repairing 

David W. Lewis Co., grate and base 

C. L. Kimball, ash slates . 

William F. Chester & Co., ladder rounds 
Mrs. A. H. Wood, repairing flags . 
George W. Manning, work on flagstaff 
J. A, Durell, hardware 
E. S. Sparrow & Co., hardware 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 
Underhill Hardware Co., hardware . 
W. E. Plumer & Co., hardware 
Fulton O'Brion, salt .... 
Highland Coal Co., lime . 
William J. McCarthy, stone dust 
J. H. Fannon, concrete 

D. J. Bennett, shot bags, etc. . 
Waldo Brothers, strainers 
Braman, Dow & Co., strainers . 

E. DeF. Wilkinson & Co., painters' sup 
plies 

Margaret A. Simpson, sand 

E. S. Kearney, sawdust 

F. C. Ayer, lumber .... 
Davenport-Brown Co., lumber . 

O. H. Belding, carpentering . 
Hemeon Brothers, carpentering 
L. B. Harmon, carpentering 

G. F. McKenna & Son, dressing 
Bay State Nurseries, trees 

J. W. Howard, plants, etc. 

E. T. Bynner, spikes .... 

C. L. Underhill, shafts and bolts 

Hale & Mayhew Co., hinge and bolts 

James Tevlin, use of teams 

George W. Prichard, use of horse . 

William G. Martin, repairing tools . 

Ames Plow Co., repairing tools 

Joseph Young, repairing tools . 

Thomas J. Grey & Co., repairing mower 

Charles E. Berry, repairing mower . 

J. B. Fellows & Co., lawn sprinklers 

David H. Hyde, rubber boots . 

Webcowit Press, printing . 

Riding & Driving Club, lunches 

H. Lowell & Son, carriage hire 

Edison Electric Illuminating Co., electric 

fountain 

Wellington- Wild Coal Co., coal 



Highways, Removing Brown-tail Moths ac- 
count, labor 



$7,075 43 

244 97 

34 91 

3 85 
6 15 
9 00 
1 50 

10 00 

27 50 

27 58 

39 57 

104 37 

95 75 

4 86 
2 
5 



01 

70 



171 17 

6 00 
26 50 

06 
40 

2 00 

3 00 
20 00 

506 81 

24 11 
29 40 
71 29 
29 76 
20 00 
93 00 

1,547 
1 
3 

1 75 

439 51 

41 00 

6 85 

6 75 

11 50 

3 65 
10 52 

8 50 

4 00 
3 00 

14 00 

25 00 



00 

00 



00 



Amount carried forward 



$10,836 99 

35 00 

$10,871 99 



108 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward .... $10,871 99 
Sidewalks Assessments account, sidewalk 

assessments . 12 41 

Highways Maintenance account, labor and 

crushed stone 55 28 

Water Maintenance account, repairs . . 58 62 



$10,998 SO' 



Public Grounds, Prospect Hill Park Completion. 

CREDIT. 



Balance from 1904 

Amount transferred to Powder-house Boulevard account 



$369 30 
369 30 



Public Library. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 . 

Receipts: — 
Amount received of the city for dog li- 
censes in 1904 

Cash: — 

Sam Walter Foss, librarian, fines . 
catalogues, books, etc. 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Sam Walter Foss, salary as libra'- 

rian 

Adele Smith, assistant librarian 
Esther M. Mayhew, cataloguer 
Edith B. Hayes, assistant cataloguer 
Anna L. Stone, assistant . 
Mabel E. Bunker, assistant 
Mary S. Woodman, assistant . 
Florence D. Hurter, assistant . 
Bessie L. Duddy, assistant 
Nellie M. Whipple, assistant 
Alice W. Sears, assistant . 
Florence M. Barber, assistant . 
Charlotte R. Lowell, assistant . 
Gardner Stacey, assistant . 
Charles A. Perry, assistant 
F. Stuart Dean, assistant . 
Trueman Gushing, assistant 
Saxton G. Foss, assistant . 
William Abbott, books 
A. L. A. Publishing Board, books 
John R. Anderson Co., books . 
American Tract Society, books 
American Library Co., books . 
American Branch Society Psychical Re 
search, books . 

Amount carried forward 



$4,105 14 

668 94 

77 14 



$2,500 00 
800 OO 
600 00 
500 00^ 
500 00' 
584 80 
500 00' 
500 00' 
500 00' 
500 00' 
466 65 
366 m 
233 34 
141 37 
228 50 
179 70 
220 05 
92 40 
7 78 

2 40 
311 77 

10 58 

3 00 

5 00' 
$9,.754 OOi 



$14,500 00 



4,851 22 
$19,351 22: 



APPENDIX TO TKEASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 109 



Amount brought forward . 
The Anderson Auction Co., books 
American Baptist Publishing Society- 
books .... 

D. Appleton & Co., books . 
N. J. Bartlett & Co., books 
William R. Bradford, books 
Richard G. Badger, books 
The Baker & Taylor Co., books 
George Barrie & Sons, books 
li. B. Bartlett, books . 
Bloch Publishing Co., books 
W. A. Butterfield, books * . 
R. E, Bisbee, books . 
Albert Britnell, books 
Burnham Antique Book Store, books 
The Burrows Brothers Co., books 
G. W. Butters, books . 
B. F. Buck & Co , books . 
P. Blackiston's Sons & Co., books 
G, "\Valdo Browne, books . 
Edward Bixby, books 
J, W. Bouton, books . 
Arthur H. Clark Co., books . 
The Century Co., books . 
Congdon & Britnell, books 
Co-operative Exchange, books 
Council of Supervisors, books . 
Charles W. Clark Co., books . 
A. B. Cross, books 
Colesworthy's Bookstore, books 
The Chappie Publishing Co., books 
Central N. E. Tract Society, books 
Dodd, Mead & Co., books . 
Desmond Publishing Co., books 
W. A. DePew, books . 
Dana Estes & Co., books . 
Derry Collard Co., books . 

E. P. Dutton & Co., books 
DeWolfe, Fiske & Co., books . . 
Frederick J. Drake & Co., books 
The Essex Institute, books 
Essex Publishing Co., books 
Emerson College of Oratory, books 
Charles Evans, books 
Educational Publishing Co., books 
Mary A. Emerson, books . 
Ethical Culture Society, books . 
P. K. Foley, books . 
T. T. Fryer, books 
Funk & Wagnalls Co., books . 
Fox, Duffield & Co., books 
Ginn & Co., books 
Goodspeed's Book Shop, books 
W. A. Greenough & Co., books 
Stanley Gibbons, books 
Harper & Brothers, books 
H. R. Huntting & Co., books . 
Francis P. Harper, books . 

Amount carried forward 



$9,754 00 


80 


77 


13 39 


47 95 


34 25 


3 57 


9 54 


36 00 


4 50 


2 92 


6 00 


19 25 


24 50 


14 73 


6 95 


80 


4 35 


4 82 


11 25 


3 75 


1 00 


7 00 


24 85 


4 50 


1 00 


3 00 


20 40 


1 00 


11 45 


50 


1 00 


39 53 


170 50 


4 00 


72 75 


1 85 


2 26 


45 


1 50 


3 25 


27 00 


5 80 


15 00 


33 64 


1 00 


3 75 


30 25 


35 49 


18 00 


75 


83 90 


9 50 


7 00 


1 44 


27 68 


4 00 


6 30 



$10,686 38 



110 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 
Norman W. Henley & Co., books 
R. H. Hinckley Co., books 
Henry Holt & Co., books . 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co., books 
David W. Hoyt, books 
H. S. Inman, books . 
International Reform Bureau, books 
Ipswich Historical Society, books 
Jordan, Marsh Co., books . 
C. A. Koehler & Co., books 
Kimball Brothers, books . 
W. A. Keating, books 
J. S. Lockwood, books 
J. B. Lyon Co., books 
C. F. Libbie & Co., books . 
J. B. Lippincott Co., books 
Little, Brown & Co., books 
George E. Littlefield, books 
Charles E. Lauriat Co., books 
Longmans, Green & Co., books 
Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, books 
S. F. McLean & Co., books 
The Macmillan Co., books 
Matthews-Northrup Works, books 
James F. Meegan, books . 
Joseph McDonough, books 
Henry Malkan, books 
Musicians' League of America, books 
John Moore, books 
Noah Farnham Morrison, books 
McDevitt- Wilson Co., books . 
Moody Publishing Co., books . 
The Medford Mercury, books . 
McGraw Publishing Co., books 
Thomas B. Mosher, books 
National Educational Association, books 
N. E. Hist. Gen. Society, books 
Niel Morrow Ladd Co., books . 
New York Observer, books 
Oxford University Press, books 
Open Court Publishing Co., books 
Old Corner Book Store, books 
Wilson Palmer, books 
Philadelphia Book Store Co., books 
Public Opinion Club, books 
S. J. Parkhill & Co., books 
Charles H. Pope, books . 
Publishers' Weekly, books 
G. P. Putnam's Sons, books 
J. D. Pearson, books . 
Pilgrim Press, books 
Frank Pergande, books 
Rand, McNally & Co., books 
Charles Scribner's Sons, books 
Sibley & Co., books . 
Somerville Journal Co., books 
Schoenhof Book Co., books 
James H. West Co., books 

Amount carried forward 



$10,686 38 

6 02 

42 00 
5 25 

38 22 

12 50 

48 00 
35 

4 50 

5 40 
21 95 

3 25 
50 77 
70 97 

5 00 
210 04 

13 05 
2,700 26 

43 12 
9 10 

17 42 

61 99 

109 61 

49 39 
2 70 

7 50 
75 

6 58 
37 00 

14 25 
2 61 

37 36 
10 00 

1 00 

12 54 
5 00 

2 00 
21 00 

13 00 

1 75 

2 16 

16 65 

25 12 
2 00 

153 03 

20 00 

4 00 

5 80 

26 00 

1 10 

2 50 

21 55 
5 00 
1 00 

27 53 
5 00 

34 26 

17 62 

3 55 

$14,763 45 



APPENDIX TO TEEASUEER AND COLLECTOE's EEPOET. Ill 



Amount brought forward . . 
Albert Clark Stevens, books 
Carlos Slafter, books .... 
G. P. Strong, books .... 
Topsfield Historical Society, books . 
J. F. Taylor & Co., books . 
Tabard Inn Library, books 
Jessie T. Trueman, books . 
Herbert B. Turner & Co., books 
Union Library Association, books . 
University of Chicago Press, books . 
J. Frank Wellington, books 
Edgar A. Werner, books . 
Writer Publishing Co., books . 
H. W. Wilson Co., books . 
John Wiley & Sons, books 
Wood & Co., books .... 
C. F. Warner, books .... 
Wycil & Co., books .... 
A. Wessels Co., books 
Young People's Missionary Movement 

books 

P. W. Ziegler Co., books . 

Oliver Ditson Co., music books 

C. W. Thompson & Co., music books 

A. R. Andrews, supplies . 

Eastern Drug Co., supplies 

Library Bureau, supplies . 

Library of Congress, supplies . 

George L. Bradlee, supplies 

Thomas Groom & Co., stationery . 

Neostyle Co., stationery . 

George T. Bailey, periodicals . 

C. M, Blake, periodicals . 

The Boston Book Co., periodicals . 

Draper Publishing Co., periodicals . 

George H. Ellis Co., periodicals 

Gustav Stickley, periodicals 

William H. Guild & Co., periodicals 

Walter S. Houghton, periodicals 

Medford Historical Society, periodicals 

George E. Whitaker, periodicals 

Publishing Committee, Somerville His 

torical Society, periodicals 
David Farquhar, binding , 
John B. H. Longfellow, binding 
P. B. Sanford Co., binding 
Quincy E. Brewster, binding . 
Boston Bookbinding Co., binding . 
O. S. M. Haskell, agency . 
S. A. Riker, agency .... 
A. M. Young, agency 
S. Louise Chandler, agency 
C. S. Lombard & Co., agency . 
M. L. Vinal, agency .... 
L. L. C. Perkins, agency . . 
Webcowit Press, printing . 
Somerville Journal Co., printing 
T. H. Armstrong, chart . 

Amount carried forward 



$14,763 45 


2 00 


2 18 


7 50 


1 60 


89 


45 00 


5 36 


1 47 


29 82 


24 00 


7 50 


2 15 


4 65 


38 36 


7 48 


2 00 


3 00 


50 


2 99 


! 5 00 


1 56 


55 29 


1 20 


18 42 


12 00 


11 02 


75 00 


6 75 


59 53 


1 50 


21 56 


12 00 


94 91 


3 00 


3 00 


3 00 


397 15 


14 00 


1 25 


2 50 


4 00 


744 15 


243 00 


999 76 


7 95 


2 10 


260 00 


14 36 


102 30 


18 36 


49 27 


19 68 


9 86 


196 25 


279 50 


15 00 



$18,717 08 



112 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 
G. W. Butters, directory . 
Estate of H. C. Dimond & Co., repairs 
C. E. Stephenson^ repairs . . . 
Arthur C. Gordon, signs . 
Cambridge Ice Co., ice 
C S. Robertson, insurance 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service 

Somerville Post-ofifice, postage 
Paine Furniture Co., chair . . $7 00 

7 00 



American Express Co., expressing 
Gilman Express Co., expressing 
E. R. Perham, expressing . 
Charles R. Taylor, expressing 
George G. Wilbur, expressing . 
J. R. Wedgewood, expressing . 



$18,717 08 
2 00 
1 00 
1 50 
18 00 
7 30 
135 00 

49 46 
30 00 



47 16 

186 37 

22. 15 

118 20 

8 40 

7 60 



$19,351 22 



Public Library, Isaac Pitman Fund, Art. 

CREDIT. 

Amount held in trust, income to be used for art . 
Amount transferred from Isaac Pitman Fund, Investment 
account 

DEBIT. 

Balance to credit of account, 1906 



$4,000 00 

251 66 

$4,251 66 

$4,251 66 



Public Library, Isaac Pitman Fund, Poetry. 



CREDIT. 



Amount held in trust, income to be used for poetry . 
Transferred from Isaac Pitman Fund, Investment account, 



DEBIT. 



Balance to credit of account, 1906 



$1,000 00 
62 92 

$1,062 92 
$1,062 92 



Public Library, Isaac Pitman Fund, Income, Art, 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1904 



Receipts: — 
Cash, income from invested funds . 



Balance of account unused, carried to 1906 . 



$5 61 

240 00 

$245 61 
84 45 



$161 J 6 



APPENDIX TO TREASUKER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 113 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Little, Brown & Co., books . 
T. T. Fryer, books .... 
George S. Bradlee, stereopticon views 
Library Art Club, pictures 
Arthur W. Hubbard, picture 
Soule Art Publishing Co., pictures . 
Yamanaka & Co., jardiniere . 



$23 89 

11 00 

101 62 

5 00 

6 00 
10 50 

3 15 



Public Library, Isaac Pitman Fund, Income, Poetry. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1904 

Interest account, balance of interest allowed on investment. 

Receipts: — 
Cash, income from invested funds 

Balance of account unused, carried to 1906 



DEBIT. 

Cash, paid N. J. Bartlett & Co., books 
Nathan Haskell Dole, books . 
Little, Brown & Co., books 
John R. Anderson Co., books . 
Colesworthy's Book Store, books . 
Lo'throp, Lee & Shepard Co., books 
Kimball Brothers, books . 



$10 80 

2 50 

15 18 

4 60 
75 

6 90 

5 00 



Public Library, Isaac Pitman Fund, Investment Account. 



CREDIT. 



$161 16 



$4 21) 
39 Sd 

60 00 



$104 12 
58 39 



$45 73 



$45 73 



Excess of premium in reinvestment of bonds 
Transferred to Art and Poetry Funds . 


. 


$314 58 
314 58 


Balance to debit of account, 1906 . 


$5,314 o8 


DEBIT. 






Balance from 1904 

Deposit in bank 


$5,000 00 
314 58 


$5,314 53 




_ 



Public Property, 

CREDIT. 

Balance to debit of account, 1906 . 

DEBIT. 

Property and Debt Balance, property ac- 
quired in 1905 (less cash, $1,200) . 
Balance from 1904 



$75,575 58 
3,826,100 14 



$3,901,675 72 



$3,901,675 72 



114 



ANNUAL EEPOKTS. 



Real Estate Liens. 



CREDIT. 



Amount abated on Ada L. Bowker estate . 
Amount allowed on George A. Richards estate 
Cash, received of J. H. Butler . . 



Balance to debit of account, 1906 



DEBIT. 



Balance from 1904 

J. H. Butler, et al., brought from Taxes 

etc 

Florence E. Walker estate reverting to city 
James Charlton estate reverting to city 



$1,757 80 

16 12 

61 20 
474 65 



$33 24 

2 05 

16 12 


$51 41 
2,258 36 



52,309 77 



$2,309-77 



Redemption of Tax Liens. 



CREDIT. 



Cash, received of sundry persons, redemption of tax liens, $1,527 53 

Amount accruing to city under Chapter 443, Acts of 1902, 

carried to Excess and Deficiency account ... 21 00 



Balance to credit of account, 1906 



DEBIT. 



(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid bonds maturing in 1905 



$1,506 53 
32 97 



$1,473 56 

DEBIT. 

Cash, paid sundry purchasers, real estate liens . . . $1,473 56 

Reduction of Funded Debt. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1904 $1,000 00 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 130,500 00 

Water Works Income, amount appropriated . . . 8,408 •^7 

$139,908 87 
Receipts: — 
Cash, received of Loring, Tolman & Tupper, premium on 

bonds 442 52 

$140,351 39 
Balance to 1906 10,851 39 



$129,500 GO 



$129,500 00 



APPENDIX TO TREASUEER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 115 



School Contingent. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 .... 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Receipts: — 
CommonAvealth of Massachusetts, tuition of state wards . 
Cash, received of G. A. Southworth, super- 
intendent of schools, damage to prop- 
erty $65 84 

tuition of non-resident pupils . . 109 16 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid Gordon A. Southworth, salary as 

superintendent of schools 
disbursements 
Cora S. Fitch, assistant 
Lemuel H. Snow, truant ofificer 

board of horse 
Jairus Mann, truant ofificer 
Eda W. Fitch, clerical services 
Middlesex County Truant School, board 

of truants 
American Book Co., books 
Allyn & Bacon, books 
Mary A. Atherton, books . 
Edward E. Babb & Co., books 
T. H. Castor & Co, books 
DeWolfe, Fiske & Co., books 
Educational Publishing Co., books 
Emerson College of Oratory, books 
Funk & Wagnalls Co., books . 
Ginn & Co., books . 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co., books 
D. C. Heath & Co., books 
Harper & Brothers, books 
Henry Holt & Co., books 
Longmans, Green & Co., books 
Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, books 
Maynard, Merrill & Co., books 
Schoenof Book Co., books 
Rand, McNally & Co., books . 
Silver, Burdett & Co., books . 
Sibley & Co., books . 
Benjamin H. Sanborn & Co., books 
Thompson, Brown & Co., books 
University Publishing Co., books 
American Oxygen Association, supplies 
Adams, Gushing & Foster, supplies 
American School Furniture Co., supplies 
L. T. Allen, supplies .... 
Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., supplies 

Amount carried forward .... 



$3,000 00 

153 38 

750 00 

1,100 00 

240 00 

49 99 

5 00 

322 14 
1,423 06 
117 00 
112 50 
624 98 
11 55 

1 47 
73 45 
26 25 

19 20 
1,599 17 

180 55 
397 86 

20 00 
75 24 
13 48 

9 47 
90 76 

6 99 
3 68 

1,406 75 

9 38 

1,147 99 

5 15 

51 18- 

2 50 
3,842 76 

5 30 
31 50 
17 23 



$23,500 OU 
1,264 81 

$24,764 81 

97 CD 



175 00 
$25,036 81 



$16,946 91 



116 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 
John A. Boyle & Co., supplies 
Joseph Breck & Sons, supplies 
Milton Bradley Co., supplies 
Carter's Ink Co., supplies . 
Clark Mfg. Co., supplies . 
Mary F. Carrick, supplies . 
N. H. Crowell, supplies 
Mrs. E. T. Curtis, supplies 
Cambridge Botanical Supply Co., sup 

plies .... 

Chandler & Barber, supplies 
Dennison Mfg. Co., supplies 
Eagle Pencil Co., supplies 
Eimer & Amend, supplies 
Esterbrook Steel Pen Co., supplies . 
Benjamin F. Freeman, supplies 
G. R. Fiske & Co., supplies 
Gilman-square Fish Market, supplies 
J. L. Hammett Co., supplies 
Houghton & Button, supplies . 
J. W. Howard, supplies . 
Holden Patent Book Cover Co., supplies 
Kuefifel & Esser Co., supplies . 
L. E. Knott Apparatus Co., supplies 
George F. King & Co., supplies 
Kenney Brothers & Wolkins, supplies 
Andrew J. Lloyd & Co., supplies 

E. H. Lansing, supplies . 
George A. LaBree, supplies 
Mitchell Mfg. Co., supplies 
McKinley Publishing Co., maps 
Theodore Metcalf Co., supplies 
Charles F. Mills, supplies . 
Marine Biological Laboratory, supplies 
Neostyle Co., supplies . . . 
New England Dressed Meat & Wool 

Co., supplies 

Pettingell-Andrews Co., supplies 

Howard W. Poor, supplies 

W. E. Plumer & Co., supplies . 

Remington Typewriter Co., supplies 

Smith Premier Typewriter Co., supplies 

Suffolk Ink Co., supplies . 

Swett & Lewis, supplies . 

T. W. Underwood Co., supplies 

M. L. Vinal. supplies 

Wadsworth, Rowland & Co., supplies 

Whitney & Snow, supplies 

A. J. Wilkinson & Co., supplies . 

John M. Woods & Co., supplies 

F. S. Webster & Co., supplies . 
Harvard University, examination papers 
Somerville Journal Co., printing 
J. H. Padgett, printing 
Allbee & Pratt, printing . 
Wesley A. Maynard, printing . 
Webcowit Press, printing 

Amount carried forward 



$16,946 91 


31 30 


23 15 


114 71 


63 88 


81 70 


15 00 


50 30 


41 17 


11, 90 


279 93 


7 93 


23 70 


246 78 


24 00 


5 50 


38 35 


60 


247 01 


13 85 


3 70 


238 96 


154 30 


522 68 


i;7 29 


37 35 


6 57 


5 00 


17 33 


6 20 


7 01 


1 30 


1 25 


5 85 


2 25 


63 


2 33 


17 10 


204 34 


1 25 


104 45 


4 00 


24 00 


6 00 


275 79 


647 16 


69 75 


9 05 


516 73 


6 96 


10 40 


872 37 


131 75 


49 25 


22 10 


6 50 



$22,376 62 



APPENDIX TO TKEASUEER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 117 



Amount brotight forward . 
C. T. C. Whitcomb, disbursements . 
S. A. Johnson, disbursements . 
Charles E. Brainard, disbursements 
A. L. Doe, disbursements . 
J. S. Emerson, disbursements . 
H. P. Knight, disbursements . 
George M. Wadsworth, disbursements 
G. A. Southworth, disbursements . 
Alfred M. Cutler, taking school census 
R. H. Tincker, taking school census 
Elisabeth S. Webster, taking school 

census 

Wyman C. Fickett, taking school census 
Charles E. Davis, taking school census 
Annie M. Gilcrease, taking school 

census 

Clara Z. Elliot, taking school census 

Oliver Ditson Co., music . 

C. C. Birchard & Co., music . 

E. S. Daniels, tuning 

H. W. Stone, engrossing . 
Boston Bank Note Co., diplomas . 
Brown, Durell & Co., ribbon . 
Oscar W. Short, services . 
Mildred Whiton, services , 
Edwin Adler, services 
James H. Chase, services . 

F, J. Barnard & Co., binding . 
David Farquhar, binding . 
Bow-street Methodist Church, use o 

edifice 

First Unitarian Society, use of edifice 

Firsi Universalist Society, use of edifice 

Hadley's Orchestra, music 

William DeWitt Hyde, address 

Edward Cummings, address 

George A, Littlefield, address . 

New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service 

W. A. Greenough & Co., directory 
Howard Lowell & Son, carriage hire 
American Express Co., expressing . 
Jackson Caldwell & Co., expressing 
Gilman Express Co., expressing 
Glines & Co., expressing . 
Charles R. Taylor, expressing . 



City Engineer account, supplies . 
Public Buildings Maintenance, School- 
houses account, telephone service 

School Teachers' Salaries. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 .... 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



,876 62 

23 83 
4 27 

1 55 

2 05 

17 14 

19 04 
8 53 

10 00 
22 02 

37 30 

53 68 

49 58 

38 58 

25 84 
38 34 

22 38 

23 84 
15 50 

102 30 

151 81 

46 16 

18 00 

20 00 
1 60 

15 00 
439 20 
645 57 

150 00 
10 00 
10 00 

274 00 

50 00 
25 00 
25 00 

149 96 

3 50 
10 00 



4 60 

2 00 

4 65 

62 07 

20 45 


$25,030 96 

2 00 

3 85 



$25,036 81 



$260,000 00 
5.325 88 



$254,674 12 



118 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid salaries as per pay-rolls " . $254,6.74 12 

Sealer of Weights and Measures. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of John H. Dusseault, fees for weighing 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid John H. Dusseault, salary as 

sealer of weights and measures . . $1,000 00 

disbursements 412 94 

R. Woodman Mfg. & Supply Co., lead 

seals 20 25 

A. C. Libby & Sons, books and sta- 
tionery 29 60 

W. A. Greenough & Co., directory . . 3 50 

Somerville Journal Co., advertising . 7 00 



$1,050 00 
6 78 

$1,043 22 

430 07 

$1,473 29 



$1,473 29 



Sewer Assessments. 

CREDIT. 

Receipts: — 
Cash, received of sundry persons . 
Balance to debit of account, 1906 . 



DEBIT. 

Balance from 1904 

Sewers Construction account, assessments 
levied 



$6,271 17 
2,686 94 



$2,637 12 
6,320 99 

$8,958 11 



$8,958 11 



Sewers Construction. 



CREDIT. 



Balance from 1904 

Appropriations, from Funded Debt, 1905 . 
Sewer Assessments account, assessments levied 



Reduced by the following transfers: — 
Grade Crossings account 



Amounts carried forward 



$1,500 00 



$6,747 08 

30,000 00 

2,686 94 

$39,434 02 



$1,500 00 $39,434 02 



APPENDIX TO TKEASUKER AND COLLECTOE's KEPOKT. 119 



Amounts brought forward . 
Highways, Paving Broadway, 

Summer Streets account 
Electrical Department account 
Sidewalks Construction account 



Bow and 



$1,500 00 $39,434 02 



Balance of account unused, carried to 1906 



Stock and labor billed other departments 
Sewers Maintenance account, labor, etc. 
Sidewalks Construction account, edgestones, 
Highways Maintenance account, cement 
Highways Construction account, cement 



DEBIT. 



8,000 00 

700 00 

2,000 00 


12,200 00 

$27,234 02 
■ 4,711 52 


$40 00 

143 25 

16 39 

70 73 


$22,522 50 
270 37 






$22,792 87 



(Expenditures.) 



Cash, paid laborers 


$2,454 97 


Bartholomew Burke, constructing 




sewer: — 




Russell road 


35 62 


Porter street 


26 44 


Pritchard avenue .... 


225 76 


Boston avenue 


182 53 


North street and Russell road 


646 16 


Daniel A. Dorey, constructing sewer: — 




Leland street 


95 16 


Joseph street .... 


327 38 


Highland avenue .... 


852 28 


Glen and Dell streets 


173 60 


Franklin and Oliver streets . 


547 00 


Bromfield road .... 


173 38 


Pearson road 


3,960 00 


Richard Falvey, constructing sewer: — 




Beacon street 


34 89 


Cameron avenue .... 


43 49 


Highland road . . . . 


40 71 


Pearson avenue .... 


34 48 


Somerville avenue .... 


758 60 


Patrick Burke, .constructing sewer: — 




Ware street 


20 90 


Palmer avenue, private lands anc 




Fountain avenue .... 


416 00 


Palmer avenue .... 


46 23 


Timothy F. Crimmings, constructing 




sewer : — 




Boston avenue .... 


62 94 


Line street 


28 95 


Dickson street .... 


138 05 


Skilton avenue . . 


292 65 


Charles A. Kelley, constructing sewer:— 




North street 


75 76 


Willard B. Byrne, constructing sewer:— 




Washington street .... 


2,833 75 



Amount carried forward 



•$14,527 68 



120 



ANNUAL REPOETS. 



Amount brought forward . 
James Fannon, constructing sewer: — 

Packard avenue .... 
New England Brick Co., brick 
Ham & Carter Co., brick . 
M. A. Simpson, sand .... 
Eastern Clay Goods Co., pipe, etc. 
Waldo Brothers, drain pipe 
David W. Lewis & Co., cement 
Barbour, Stockwell Co., catch basins 
Somerville Iron Foundry, castings . 
Osgood & Witherly, castings . 
Charles E. Berry, labor and materials 
F. C. Ayer, lumber .... 
J. H. Fannon, repairing sidewalk . 
Somerville Journal Co., printing 
Thomas Groom & Co., stationery . 
Edwin O. Childs, Registrar, recording 
James Tevlin, teaming 
Boston & Maine Railroad, freight . 



Water Maintenance account, service . 
Sidewalks Maintenance account, brick . 
Highways Maintenance account, labor, etc., 



$14,527 68 

300 00 

381 60 

37 50 

7 50 
321 68 

3,917 42 

1,293 73 

9 50 

834 00 

80 00 

33 34 

6 32 

9 00 

12 00 

15 75 

8 60 
646 50 
110 76 



$22,552 88 


9 70 


6 75 


223 54 



$22,792 87 



Sewers, Maintenance. 



CREDIT. 



Water Works Income, amount appropriated 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Receipts : — 
Cash, received of M. Berman, old iron and hose . 

Stock and labor billed other departments: — 
City Engineer account, stone bounds . 
Public Buildings Maintenance account, 
labor, etc. 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid laborers .... 

F. C. Ayer, lumber .... 
Davenport-Brown Co., cypress gates 
The Cornelius Callahan Co., repairing 

hose 

Norton & Co., rubber hose 

Edson Mfg. Co., hose and couplings 

A. R. Hyde, repairing boots 

A. Silverman, repairing rubber boots 

William G. Martin, keys and repairing 

New England Brick Co., brick 

Amount carried forward 



• 


$12,000 00 
1 72 




$11,998 28 


• 


13 40 


50 




58 


107 08 





$7,063 


34 


22 


27 


25 


62 


26 75 


75 


00 


46 


13 


52 


60 


2 


10 


6 75 


173 20 



$12,118 76 



$7,493 76 



APPENDIX TO TKEASUKEK AND COLLECTOK S REPORT. 



.21 



Amount brought forward . 
William S. Howe, repairing leak . 
Frank R. Kenney, repairing register 
Perrin, Seamans & Co., tools and sup 

plies 

Whitney & Snow, tools and supplies 

I. B. Walker, repairing tools . 

C. L. Underhill, ice cutters, etc. 

W. E. Plumer & Co., hardware 

C. E. Berry, labor and repairing tools 

Hemeon Brothers, tool box 

M. A. Simpson, sand 

William Bennett, sand 

Waldo Brothers, lime 

David W. Lewis Co., cement . 

Somerville Iron Foundry, castings 

Osgood & Witherly, castings . 

Barbour, Stockwell Co., castings 

James Tevlin, use of teams 

Webcowit Press, printing 

M. L. Vinal, stationery 

Thomas Groom & Co., stationery 

A. C. Libby & Sons, stationery . 

Fulton O'Brion, salt . 

H. Fisher, hats and suits . 

John Fisher & Co., sewer pails 

New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service .... 
E. W. Danforth, disbursements 



Public Grounds account, repairing catch 
basins 

Sewers Construction account, repairing 
sewer 

Highways Maintenance account, crushed 
stono . . . . . 



$7,493 76 
1 70 
8 00 

8 93 
153 73 

22 95 

40 15 
1 51 
7 50 
6 00 
1 00 

9 75 
72 71 
71 09 

172 55 

5 00 
4 00 

3,765 02 

6 50 
20 

15 25 

27 00 

29 75 

30 00 
9 00 

24 84 

28 00 

$12,015 89 
45 00 
40 00 
17 87 



$12,118 76 



Sidewalk Assessments. 

CREDIT. 

Balance of account carried to 1906 

Receipts: — 
Received of sundry persons (cash) 



$12,648 81 

27 09 



Sidewalk assessments on Broadway abated by order of the 
Board of Aldermen 



DEBIT. 

Balance from 1904 .... . . $6,009 18 

Sidewalks Construction account, assess- 
ments levied 11,036 25 

Sidewalk assessment on Broadway paid by 
the city and abated by the Board of 
Aldermen 12 41 



$3,700 40 

12,675 90 
681 54 

$17,057 84 



$17,057 84 



122 



ANNUAL EEPOETS. 



Sidewalks, Construction. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Funded Debt, 1905 
Transferred from Sewers Construction account . 
Transferred from Highways Construction account 



Balance of account carried to 1906 



Transferred to Highways Construction account 



'Sidewalk Assessments abated by order of the Board of 
Aldermen 



Sidewalk Assessments account, assessments levied 

Receipts: — 
'Cash, received of sundry persons, constructing sidewalks . 

Stock and labor billed other departments: — 
Highways Maintenance account, labor, etc. 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Balance from 1904 .... 
'Cash, paid laborers 

S. & R. J. Lombard, edgestones 

William J. McCarthy, crushed stone 

Ham & Carter Co., bricks 

Thomas Groom & Co., books . 

Somerville Journal Co., printing 

S. H. Lewis, loam 

Underbill Hardware Co., hardware 

T. Allen, granolithic . 



Highways Maintenance account, use of city 
teams 

"Sewers Construction account, edgestones . 

Highways Construction account, paving 
blocks 



$2,825 45 


7,058 87 


10,308 79 


69 85 


3,125 10 


21 00 


25 00 


50 90 


3 50 


1,190 59 


$24,679 05 


1,779 66 


143 25 


4 88 



$16,000 00 
2,000 00 
1,500 00 

$19,500 00 
739 75 

$18,760 25 
5,000 00 

$13,760 25 

681 54 

$13,078 71 
11,036 25 

1,128 79 

1,363 09 

$26,606 84 



$26,606 84 



Sidewalks, Maintenance. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 .... 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Stock and labor billed other departments: — 
Highways Maintenance account, bricks 



$20 14 



Amounts carried forward 



$20 14 



$3,000 00 
6 95 

$2,993 05 



$2,993 05 



APPENDIX TO TEEASUKER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 123 

Amounts brought forward .... $20 14 $2,993 05 

Highways Construction account, bricks . 18 55 

Sewers Construction account, bricks . . 6 75 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

"Cash, paid laborers $2,156 42 

Ham & Carter Co., bricks .... 370 73 

Warren Brothers Co., repairing sidewalk, 23 76 



$2,550 91 



Highways Maintenance account, use of city 

teams and materials .... 467 70 

Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings ac- 
count, paving bricks .... 19 88 



DEBIT. 



(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid sundry persons as 

per pay-rolls . . . $21,866 00 

53 00 
$21,813 00 

Amount carried forward .... $21,813 00 



45 44 



$3,038 49 



$3,038 49 



Soldiers' Burials. 

CREDIT. 

Receipts: — 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, soldiers' burials . . $630 00 

DEBIT. 

# 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid John Bryant's Sons, services as 
undertakers 

A. E. Mann, services as undertaker . 

W. A. Flaherty & Son, services as under- 
takers 

John E. Kauler, services as undertaker . 

W. A. Frink, services as undertaker 

Francis M. Wilson, services as under- 
taker 

A. E. Long & Son, services as under- 
takers 

J. H. Boomer, services as undertaker 



Soldiers' Relief. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 $18,500 00 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . . 3,408 13 



$105 00 
70 00 




105 00 
105 00 

70 00 




105 00 




35 00 
35 00 


$630 00 





$21,908 18 



124 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 
Webcowit Press, printing cards 
Charles W. Dailey, ambulance . 
Wellington-Wild Coal Co., fuel 
Consumers' Coal Co., fuel . 
Frederick L. Briggs, burial 



$21,813 00 




3 25 




6 00 




10 78 




3 10 




72 00 






$21,908 13' 





Somerville Hospital. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 



$5,000 00 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid for support of sick poor 



$5,000 00 



State Aid. 

CREDIT. ■ 

(Receipts.) 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, state aid paid in 1905 



$14,548 00 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 
Cash, paid monthly pay-rolls . . . . 



$14,600 00 
52 00 



$14,548 00 



Street Lights. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 .... 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of sundry persons, lighting Westwood road, 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid the Edison Electric Illuminating 
Company of Boston, arc lighting . 
incandescent lighting .... 

moving lamps 

J. H. Thompson, carriage hire . 



$66,000 00 
109 11 

$65,890 89 

39 60 

$65,930 49 



$51,072 86 
14,741 63 

108 00 
8 00 


$65,930 4f> 





APPENDIX TO TKEASUREK AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 125 



-Sundry Persons. 

Balance from 1904 



CREDIT. 



DEBIT. 



Balance to credit of account, 1906 



$524 21 
$524 21 



Support of Poor, City Home. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 

Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred . 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of J. Foster Colquhoun, 

produce 

Town of Arlington, aid 
Town of Sandwich, aid 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid J. Foster Colquhoun, salary as 

warden 

disbursements 
Mrs. Catherine Colquhoun, matron 

Farm help 

House help .... 

Ella Perry, nursing 

D. J. Bennett, harness work 

James Forgie's Sons, harness work 

J. B. Rufer, horseshoeing , 

George W. Ladd, horseshoeing 

I. L. Roberts, horseshoeing 

I. B. Walker, wagon repairs . 

J. S. Bradeen Co., hay and grain 

H. E. Gustin, farm supplies 

Schlegel & Fottler Co., farm supplies 

W. W. Rawson & Co., farm supplies 

C. F. Penney, farm supplies 

Joseph Breck & Sons, farm supplies 

Hollis, Park & Pollard, farm supplies 

Rice Brothers, farm supplies . 

R. & J. Farquhar & Co., farm supplies 

Henry Lynde, boxes and glass . 

F. O. Johnson, piping hothouse 

Pittsburg Plate Glass Co., glass 

The Hale & Mayhew Co., irons for hot 

house 

John Williams, boxes 

George G. Page Box Co., boxes 

Amount carried' forward 



$3,811 74 
10 00 
90 50 



$700 00 

195 46 

250 00 

1,175 95 

329 43 

20 43 

12 75 

2 45 
108 15 

4 50 

5 50 

3 30 
554 96 

3 20 
77 83 
24 65 

6 00 
36 07 

4 75 
4 50 
2 65 

67 64 
49 27 
23 76 

2 35 

4 00 

15 87 

$3,685 42 



$2,800 00 
762 12 

$3,562 12 



3,912 24 



$7,474 36 



126 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 
M. J. Gallagher & Co., boxes . 
C. D. Gallagher, boxes 
Harris P. Tibbetts, carpentering 
Allen, Thompson, Whitney Co., furniture 
Page & Baker, furniture . 
L. T. Allen, curtains .... 
J. C. H. Snow, screens, etc. 
William Oswald Co., kitchen supplies 
Magee Furnace Co., kitchen supplies 
Jordan, Marsh Co., kitchen supplies 
Parke Snow, dry goods 
Brown, Durrell & Co., clothing 
A. Keene, clothing .... 
George H. Thayer, boots and shoes 
O. Elliot Smith, clothing . 
Mass. State Prison, clothing . 
Whitcomb Metallic Bedstead Co., beds 

and bedding 

Farley, Harvey & Co., bedding 

Franklin Rubber Co., rubber matting 

Reuben Ring & Co., medicine 

Percy A. Hall, medicine . 

Codman & Shurtleff, medical appliances 

S. M. Lawrence, milk 

C. F. Crocker, groceries 
J. F. Clark & Co., groceries 
Beyer Brothers Commission Co., groc 

eries .... 

Ar-Showe & Co., groceries 
Boston Dairy Co., groceries 
Clark Brothers Co., groceries 
L. M. Dyer & Co., groceries 
E. H. Freeman, groceries . 
L. C. Fisher & Co., groceries 
Braman, Dow & Co., gas pipe 
Joseph Huse & Son, boiler grates . 

D. J. Green & Co., brushes, etc. 

E. O. Arnold & Co., carpet cleaning 
Lightning Insecticide O. C. Co., disin 

fectant 

C. W. Lerned & Co., disinfectant . 
H. S. Pond, swill . 

Herbert Wood, repairing tools . 
Brown & Hildred, lawn mower repairs 
Morrell Picture Frame & Shade Co. 

frames 

E. S. Sparrow & Co., hardware 
W. E. Plumer & Co., hardware 
E. D. Sawyer Lumber Co., lumber 
T. E. Littlefield, lumber . 
Highland Coal Co., cement 
William B. Mackay, cement 
J. H. Fannon. concrete walk . 
J. T. Glines Co., groceries 

E. A. Holbrook, groceries 

F. J. Hopkins, groceries . 
The G. H. Hammond Co., groceries 
Charles A. Holmes, groceries . 

Amount carried forward 



$3,685 42 
7 00 

4 50 
135 15 

19 40 
164 50 

26 S6 
132 40 

32 83 

5 80 

25 23 
108 01 

15 03 
22 65 
42 55 

1 80 

31 50 

245 75 
79 30 
34 48 

13 25 

32 52 

1 40 
70 69 
94 82 

2 35 

24 60 

26 75 
2 30 

51 50 

527 25 

45 75 

11 90 

17 

1 40 

14 08 

16 50 

1 50 
7 50 
110 75 
1 25 
1 00 

1 75 
19 87 
82 71 
32 44 

1 45 
38 15 

6 25 
91 65 
10 00 
34 25 
41 23 

27 00 
5 17 



$6,271 31 



APPENDIX TO TEEASUEEE AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 127 



Amount brought forward . 
Hammond Packing Co., groceries 
Nelson, Morris & Co., groceries 
National Biscuit Co., groceries 
Rice Brothers, groceries . 
J. W. Roberts & Co., groceries 
Russell & Co., groceries . 
H. F. Sander, groceries . 
Swift & Co., groceries 
Sperber & Co., groceries . 
Sander's Creamery, groceries . 
F. A. Weldon, groceries . 
Joseph H. White & Sons, groceries 
John Wolf, Jr., & Co., groceries 
Cambridge Ice Co., ice 
Thomas Groom & Co., stationery- 
Town of Hingham, Eldridge elopement. 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., service 

E. R. Perham, expressing 



Health Department, Collection of Ashes and 
Offal account, swill .... 

Highways, Removing Brown-tail Moths ac- 
count 

Highways Maintenance account, labor 

Water Department account, water pipes 

$7,474 36^ 



•$6,271 31 


26 00 


11 52 


49 36 


2 50 


418 38 


125 42 


48 83 


2 80 


95 51 


14 84 


13 09 


24 95 


8 80 


20 85 


70 


2 00 


47 92 


40 


$7,185 18 


212 73 


7 50 


8 00 


60 95 



Support of Poor, Hiscellaneous. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriations, from Taxes, 1905 .... 
Excess and Deficiency account, balance transferred 



$14,000 00 
820 04 













$13,179 m 


Receipts: — 




Commonwealth of Massachusetts, support of state paupers. 


1,358 72 


Cash, received for support of paupers: — 




City of Boston $1,244 13 




City of Beverly . 








49 00 




City of Cambridge 








295 55 




City of Chelsea . 








44 64 




City of Everett . 








49 45 




City of Fitchburg 








24 00 




City of Fall River 








200 05 




City of Gloucester 








52 17 




City of Haverhill 








80 00 




City of Lowell 








9 00 


• 


City of Maiden . 








47 75 




City of Newton . 








181 10 




City of New Bedford 








25 00 




City of Quincy . 








21 00 




City of Salem 








18 87 




City of Springfield 








38 00 





Amounts carried forward 



$2,379 71 $14,538 68 



128 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 
City of Worcester 
City of Waltham 
City of Woburn . 
Town of Arlington 
Town of Acton . 
Town of Andover 
Town of Belmont 
Town of Boylston 
Town of Canton . 
Town of Concord 
Town of Framingham 
Town of Gardner 
Town of Leominster 
Town of Wakefield 
Town of Winthrop 
Frank Burke, aid 
Samuel Rines, aid 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid for support of state paupers: — 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts . 
Foxboro State Hospital . , . . 
Massachusetts School for Feeble-Minded, 
Massachusetts Hospital for Dipsomaniacs 

and Inebriates .... 

Massachusetts School for Epileptics 
Somerville Hospital, support and treat 

ment of sick poor 
City of Boston . 
City of Cambridge 
City of Medford . 
City of Newton . 
City of Worcester 
Town of Attleboro 
Town of Brookline 
Town of Revere . 
Town of Pepperell 
Ellen Mahoney, cash allowance 
Bridget Condon, board 
Maria S. Higgins, board 
Emiline K. Willis, board 
Ann Kelley, board 
Maria L. Messerve, board 
Edw. Hunnewell, board 
E. C. Ingersoll. board 
The Children's Mission, board . 
Charles C. Folsom, salary as agent 

disbursements 
Alvah B. Dearborn, city physician 
Cora F. Lewis, secretary . 
Wellington-Wild Coal Co., fuel 
Frank A. Teele, fuel . 
• Metropolitan Coal Co., fuel 



$2,379 71 
35 50 
42 25 

35 00 
33 00 
11 75 

44 56 
48 25 
21 95 

7 75 

45 50 
29 30 

2 00 

36 59 
15 25 

4 00 

69 64 

127 20 



$14,538 6S 



$630 


06 


51 


08 


892 29 


317 


25 


533 00 


1,538 


55 


1,008 


74 


118 61 


36 


50 


20 


00 


46 00 


114 40 


105 


75 


89 57 


137 


06 


84 00 


120 


73 


25 


87 


52 


17 


14 14 


35 02 


17 44 


8 


72 


140 00 


1,600 


00 


181 


19 


1,800 


00 


700 00 


771 


34 


41 


55 


3 38 



2,989 20 
$17,527 88 



Amount carried forward 



$11,234 41 



APPENDIX TO TEEASUREK AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 129 



Amount brought forward . 
Fresh Pond Ice Co., ice . 
Surgeons' & Physicians' Supply Co 

medicine .... 

The G. F. Harvey Co., medicine 
Charles Killgore, medicine 
Milton H. Plummer, medicine . 
The Fraser Tablet Co., medicine 
Bell & Co., medicine . 
Swan & Co., medicine 
Bristol-Myers Co., medicine 
L. E. Allen & Co., groceries 
J. W. Applin, groceries 
H. G. Applin, groceries . 
W. P. Blanchard, groceries 
James Bartley, groceries . 
N. R. Barrows, groceries . 
F, A. Barlow, groceries . 

C. S. Butters, groceries 
M. D. Brown, groceries . 
Edward Coliten & Son, groceries 
Copithorne Brothers, groceries 
A. F. Carpenter, groceries 
F. L. Card, groceries 
John T. Connor Corporation, groceries 
F. E. Cheney Co., groceries 
James Davis, groceries 

George E. Farnam, groceries . 
Charles F. Giles, groceries 
James Harris, groceries 
F. A. E. Jewell, groceries . 
M. L. King, groceries 
M. D. Lewis, groceries 
Medford-street Market, groceries 

D. A. McKay, groceries . 
James H. Maguire, groceries . 
Susan Nangle. groceries 
Public Market, groceries . 
A. E. Robie, groceries 
R. M. Sturtevant & Co., groceries 
Charles H. Sands, groceries 
D. E. Watson, groceries . 
Joseph J. Kelley & Son, burials 
F. M. Wilson, burials 
A. E. Mann, burials . 
John Bryant's Sons, burials 
W. A. Flaherty & Son, burials 
John S. McGowan, burials 
John E. Kauler, burials 

George F. McKenna, burials . 

P. H. Rafferty, burials 

Mrs. Thomas J. Colwell, nursing 

F. W. Gilbert, boots and shoes 

David H. Hyde, boots and shoes 

W. J. Emerson, boots and shoes 

J. H. Brooks, dry goods . 

M. G. Staples, moving clothing 

Howard Lowell & Son, carriage hire 

Charles W. Dailey, carriage hire 

Amount carried forward 



$11,234 41 


3 20 


8 05 


34 67 


7 23 


82 52 


5 52 


2 00 


1 50 


e 00 


4 00 


2 00 


32 00 


146 00 


386 00 


91 00 


211 98 


84 00 


12 00 


321 00 


31 16 


349 86 


. 90 00 


4 00 


177 50 


220 00 


34 00 


813 50 


17 50 


59 00 


155 50 


24 00 


427 50 


241 50 


302 00 


54 00 


52 00 


126 00 


806 50 


46 00 


318 GO 


15 00 


45 00 


20 00 


10 00 


34 00 


15 00 


5 00 


20 00 


30 00 


3 00 


60 05 


3 00 


2 75 


9 50 


1 50 


6 00 


14 00 



$17,318 40 



130 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 

ambulance .... 
Thomas Groom & Co., stationery 
Somerville Journal Co., printing 
W. A. Greenough & Co., directory- 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 
Co., service ...... 



$17,318 40 

12 00 

29 10 

71 95 

3 50 

92 93 



$17,527 38 



Taxes. 



CREDIT. 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received for taxes of 1900 
" " 1901 



$1,671 20 

2 48 



1904, $226,060 50 
25 89 



1905 



Balance to debit of account, 1906: — 
Being uncollected taxes of 1900 . 
" " 1901 
<i ii s( i( 2902 

" " 1903, $5,374 54 
2 48 



1904, $6,776 90 
25 89 



" 1905 



$24 00 
286 72 
593 95 



1,673 



226,034 61 
875,216 62 



Overlay and Abatement: — 




Abatements on taxes of 1900 


$923 36 


" " 1901 . 


1,687 19 


" " 1902 . 


534 56 


" " 1903 . 


251 32 


" " 1904 . 


1,406 04 


" '' 1905 . 


7,857 79 



$545 72 

629 40 

3,121 05 



5,372 06 



6,802 79 
262,981 03 



$1,103,829 58 



12,660 26 



279,452 05 
$1,395,9J1 89 



DEBIT. 



Balance from 1904 $249,886 45 

Tax Levy, as per assessors' warrant of 

August 10, 1905 . . . . . 1,144,000 14 
Supplementary warrants, amounts credited 

to Overlay and Abatement account . 2,055 30 



$1,395,941 8P 



APPENDIX TO TEEASUEEE AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT, lol 



Temporary Loans. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1904 

-Cash, borrowed by authority of the Board 

of Aldermen on notes as follows: — 
City Note No. 590, ten months, 3.25 per 

cent. 

City Note No. 591, ten months, 3.42 per 

cent, (discount) 

City Note. No. 592, eight months, 3.25 

per cent. 

City Note No. 593, eight months, 3.25 

per cent " . 

City Note No. 594, eight months, 3.25 

per cent. 

City Note No. 595, seven months, three 

days, 3.24 per cent. .... 

City Note No. 596, nine months, 3.60 per 

cent. 

City Note No. 597, nine months, 3.60 per 

cent. 

City Note No. 598, five months, 3.75 per 

cent. 



DEBIT. 



$350,000 oa^ 



(Expenditures.) 



Cash, paid as follows: — 

City Notes Nos. 573, 574, 575, 576 

City Note No. 583 

City Note No. 584 

City Note No. 585 

City Note No. 586 

City Note No. 587 

City Note No. 588 

City Note No. 589 

City Note No. 590 

City Note No. 591 

City Note No. 592 

City Note No. 593 

City Note No. 594 



Balance to credit of account, 1906 



$100,000 00 

25,000 00 

50,000 00 

50,000 00 

50,000 00- 

100,000 00- 

100,000 00 

100,000 00 

50,000 00 



$100,000 00 
50,000 00 
25,000 00 
20,000 00 
25,000 00 
30,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 
100,000 00 
25,000 00 
50,000 00' 
50,000 00 
50,000 00' 

$625,000 00 
350,000 00 



625,000 00 
$975,000 00 



$975,000 00 



Water Loan Interest. 

CREDIT. 

Water Works Income, amount appropriated 

DEBIT. 

Coupons maturing April 1, 1905: — 

$72,000, six months, 4 per cent. 

Amount carried forward .... 



$1,440 00 
$1,440 00 



$4,450 Oft' 



132 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 
Coupons maturing July 1, 1905: — 

$26,000, six months, 4 per cent. 

$10,000, six months, 6V2 per cent. 
Coupons maturing October 1, 1905: — 

$72,000, six months, 4 per cent. 
Coupons maturing January 1, 1906: — 

$25,000, six months, 4 per cent. 

$10,000, six months, 5^ per cent. 



$1,440 00 

520 00 
275 00 

1,440 00 

500 00 
275 00 



I 



$4,450 00 



Water Maintenance. 



CREDIT. 



Water Works Income, amount appropriated 
Water Works Income, amount transferred . 



Water Works Income, balance of appropriation trans- 
ferred 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of sundry persons, costs 
Sundry persons, pipe, fittings, etc. . 

Stock and labor billed other departments: 
Highway Maintenance account, labor . 
Public Grounds account, labor 
Sewers Construction account, pipe 
Support of Poor, City Home account, pipe, 

etc 

Highways, Watering Streets account, labor . 
Water Works Extension account, stock 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid laborers 

Frank E. Merrill, salary as water com- 
missioner 

disbursements 
Edward M. Shedd, inspector 
Lillian E. Leavitt, assistant 
Laura E. Peavey, assistant 
Florence H. Plimpton, clerical services 
Marcella F. Kendall, clerical services 
EfTfie Fife, clerical services 
Eda Fitch, clerical services 
Hobart S. Palmer, hay and grain . 
Nathan Tufts & Sons, hay and grain 
William F. Emerson, hay and grain 
Fulton O'Brion, hay and grain . 
Proctor Brothers, hay and grain 
George W. Ladd, horseshoeing 

Amount carried forward 



$299 00 

683 97 



$3 13 

58 62 

9 70 

60 95 
145 16 

12,937 67 



$15,801 20 

2,300 00 

70 13 

1,300 00 

780 00 

600 00 

236 00 

72 00 

16 00 

8 00 

164 30 

142 50 

11 40 

291 20 

258 53 

24 50 

$22,075 76 



$24,000 00 
1,500 00 

$25,500 00 

2,528 91 

$28,028 91 



982 97 



I 



13,215 23 
$42,227 11 



APPENDIX TO TKEA SURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 133 



Amount brought forward . 
Edward O'Brien, horseshoeing 
John B. Rufer, horseshoeing 
Taylor & Rawson, buggy . 
Hale & Mayhew Co., wagon repairs 

C. L. Underbill, wagon repairs 

repairing tools 

D, J. Bennett, harness work . 
C. H. Paine, condition powders 
William Buckley, veterinary services 
J. E. Richardson, services . 
A. J. Wilkinson & Co., tools 
Chandler & Farquhar, tools 
William G. Martin, repairing tools 
H. Wood, repairing tools 
Brown & Hildred, repairing tools 
James Dorna, repairing tools . 
I. B. Walker, repairing tools . 
Albert Griffiths Saw Co., repairing tools, 
Perrin, Seamans & Co., repairing pump, 

etc. ...... 

F. W. Gilbert, rubber boots 

O. T. Gould, repairing clock . 

P. S. Lynch, labor 

William S. Howe, tunnel, etc. . 

Charles A. Claflin & Co., couplings 

Waldo Brothers, cement . 

Margaret A. Simpson, sand 

Richards & Co., lead . 

Harold L. Bond & Co., melting pot 

Underbill Hardware Co., hardware 

W. E. Plumer & Co., hardware 

William J. Wiley, hardware 

Louis A. Bacon, felt . 

Henry C. Hunt Co., leather 

P. J. Flannery, stop and waste cocks 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., corporation cocks 

A. W. Chesterton & Co., gaskets 

Boston Woven Hose & Rubber Co., 

gaskets 

Andrew J. Lloyd & Co., charts 

Crosby Steam Gage & Valve Co., charts 

Edson Mfg. Co., bolts 

F. E. Fitts Mfg. & Supply Co., seals 

H. J. Shaw, hydrant rods . 

The Dececo Co., service gates . 

Norwood Engineering Co., valves . 

Coffin Valve Co., valves . 

Chapman Valve Mfg. Co., valves 

The Fairbanks Co., valves 

Lead-Lined Iron Pipe Co., pipe 

Chadwick-Boston Lead Co., pipe . 

R. D. Wood & Co., pipe . 

Rensselaer Mfg. Co., hydrants . 

Thomson Meter Co, meters 

Hersey Mfg. Co., meters . 

Neptune Meter Co., meters 

National Meter Co., meters 

Union Water Meter Co., meters 

Amount carried forward 



$22,075 76 

121 25 

28 00 

120 00 

129 00 

78 10 

144 38 

199 25 

5 00 

26 00 

2 00 

13 24 

13 13 

2 00 
20 

3 00 
18 14 

75 

4 10 

104 20 
18 55 

5 00 
1 25 
9 40 

28 33 
82 70 
17 00 
41 63 
12 36 
65 27 

125 57 
3 20 
3 60 

3 81 
95 00 

169 06 

4 84 

11 32 
1 38 
4 00 
1 89 
3 50 

36 58 

29 60 
310 00 
138 00 

40 57 

23 18 

891 36 

1,482 59 

3,435 68 

451 90 

3,980 91 

296 61 

157 75 

21 95 

1,869 40 

$36,962 24 



134 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 

Henry R. Worthington, meters 

Joseph Sigel, meters . 

Sumner & Goodwin Co., fittings 

Walworth Mfg. Co., fittings . 

Braman, Dow & Co., fittings . 

Osgood & Witherly, castings . 

Julian D'Este Co., castings 

Somerville Iron Foundry, castings 

C W. Lerned & Co., disinfectant 

.H. E. Bowman, medicine . 

Boston & Maine Railroad Co., freight 

Boston & Albany Railroad Co., track 
protection ..... 

Boston Elevated Railway Co., car tickets 

Globe Gas Light Co., gasolene 

New England Oil Co., oil . 

D. A. McKay, soap . 

S. W. Fuller, lumber . 

George W. Gale Lumber Co., lumber 

Shaw & Remby, lumber . 

Cyril J. Larivee & Co., lumber . 

JEastern Salt Co., salt . 

Fresh Pond Ice Co., ice . 

Winter-hill Ice Co., ice 

S. C. Baxter, inspection . 

Brown- Wales Co., hoops . 
.Joe Cotter, shafting 

James H. Roberts & Co., pulleys 

Thomas Groom & Co., stationery 

H. B. Lambert, stamps 

The Elliott Co., stencil cutter, etc. 

Somerville Journal Co., printing 

Wesley A. Maynard, printing . 

Frank A, Teele, wood 

Wellington-Wild Coal Co., fuel 

A. F. Lewis Mfg. Co., files 

William G. Johnston & Co., holders 

New England Telephone & Telegraph 
Co., service 

Municipal Engineering Co., subscription. 

Fire & Water Engineering Co., subscrip- 
tion 

W. A. Greenough & Co., directory . 

Sanborn Map Co., correcting map . 

J. H. Fannon, repairing . 

Merriman Brothers, repairing blocks 

Smith-Premier Typewriter Co., repairs 

Derby Desk Co., repairing desk 

William R. Conard, pipe inspection . 

R. Woodman Mfg. & Supply Co., sealing 
press and wire 

L. H. Truesde.ll, show card 

Pettingell-Andrews Co., electrical sup 
plies 

H. G. White, motor . 

"Kenneth A. Skinner, rent of automobile 

Timothy F. Crimmings, use of team 

T. M. Durell, M. D., medical services 



$36,962 24 
525 00 

5 00 
25 03 
29 59 

546 08 
732 74 

78 44 
419 46 

22 50 

3 20 

313 47 

3 74 

25 00 
19' 05 
53 10 

1 05 

98 37 

129 17 

1 56 

4 62 

6 80 
6Q 55 

26 74 
10 00 

50 

1 25 
36 65 

169 75 
240 00 

170 45 
240 60 

2 75 
45 00 
19 75 

1 00 
22 80 

221 79 

2 00 



00 
50 



10 00 



50 
80 
20 
00 



80 51 

12 00 
50 

7 79 

110 00 

20 00 

5 00 
25 00 



Amount carried forward 



$41,576 59 



APPENDIX TO TEEASUKEK AND COLLECTOK's KEPORT. 135 



Amount brought forward . . . . 
Elizabeth Waters, compensation for 

damages ..... 
P. J. O'Malley, claim . 
J. W. Applin, claim . 
Mrs. B. Martin, claim 
American Express Co., expressing 
Oilman Express. Co., expressing 
A. B. Cronin, expressing . 



$41,576 59 


500 00 


78 75 


30 00 


8 50 


18 55 


8 72 


6 00 



$42,227 11 



Water [Service Assessments. 



CREDIT. 



Receipts: — 
Cash, received of sundry persons, costs of services laid 
Transferred to Water Works Income account . 



$4,45G 53 
4,456 58 



Water Works, Abatements on Water Charges, 



CREDIT. 

Water Works Income, amount appropriated 



$487 20 



DEBIT. 

Cash, paid sundry persons, money refunded 



Water Works Extension. 



$487 20 



CREDIT. 



Water Works Income, amount appropriated 
Water Works Income, balance transferred . 



Stock and labor billed other departments: — 
Highways, Watering Streets account, stock, etc. 



$15,000 00 
1,796 13 



$16,796 18 

49 77 

$16,845 95 



DEBIT. 

(Expenditures.) 

Cash, paid laborers $4,908 28 

Water Maintenance account: — 

pipe stock 3,834 86 

service stock 2,867 34 

meter stock 5,235 47 



$16,845 95 



136 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Water Works Income. 



CREDIT. 

Metered Water Charges, last quarter 1905 uncollected 

Receipts: — 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, propor- 
tion of water receipts, 1905 . . . $809 65 
Water Service Assessments, receipts of 1905, 4,456 58 

Cash, received of sundry water takers . 



DEBIT. 

Water Maintenance account, amount appro- 
priated 

Water Maintenance account, amount trans- 
ferred 

Water Maintenance account, balance trans- 
ferred 

Fire Department, amount appropriated 

Reduction of Funded Debt, Water Loan 
Bonds, amount appropriated 

Water Loan Interest, amount appropriated . 

Water Works Extension account, amount 
appropriated 

Water Works Extension account, balance 
transferred , 

Sewers Maintenance account, amount ap- 
propriated 

Water Works, Abatements on Water 
Charges account, abatements in 1905 . 

Metered Water Charges account, abate- 
ments 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Metro- 
politan Water Assessment . 

Reduction of Funded Debt account, balance 
transferred 



$19,185 5S 



i 



' 


5,206 2S 
197,770 12 




$222,227 88= 


$24,000 00 




1,500 00 




2,528 91 
61,465 00 




6,000 00 
4,450 00 




15,000 00 




1,796 18 




12,000 00 




487 20 




30 99 




90,560 73 




2,408 87 


$222,227 88 



1 



Table D.— Balances December 31, 1905 

Cash 

Assessors .... 

City Messenger 
City Solicitor .... 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Election Expenses: — 

Commissioner of Public Buildings 

Registrars of Voters . 
Electrical Department 
Fire Department .... 
Health Department, Collection of 

and Offal . . . . 
Highway Betterment Assessments 
Inspection of Buildings . 
Metered Water Charges . 

Amount carried forward 



Ashes 



$116,483 89 

81 31 

111 78 

44 09 

16,111 42 


^12 53 

83 79 

337 75- 

2,823 87 


11,228 79 

5,152 78 

46 95 

19,184 09 


$172,003 04 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 13T 



Fund, Invest 



Amount brought forward . 
Public Buildings Maintenance: — 

City Hall Annex . 

Fire Department . 

Janitors' Salaries 

Schoolhouses 

Support of Poor . 

Water Department 
Public Library, Isaac Pitman 

ment 
Public Property 
Real Estate Liens . 
School Contingent . 
Sewer Assessments , 
Sidewalk Assessments 
Soldiers' Relief 
Support of Poor, City Home 
Taxes .... 

City Auditor 
City Clerk 
City Engineer . 
City Treasurer 
Contingent Fund 
Coupons Unpaid 
Election Expenses: — 

City Clerk 

Election Officers . 
Excess and Deficiency 
Executive Department 
Fire Department, Combination Ladder 

cal Engine 
Funded Debt . 
Grade Crossings 
Health Department 
Highways Construction 
Highways Maintenance 
Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings 
Highways, Paving Broadway, Bow and Summer 
Highways, Thorndike-street Subway . 
Highways, Removal of Brown-tail Moths 
Highways, Shade Trees . 
Highways, Watering Streets 
Interest 
Military Aid 



$172,003 04 



Overlay and Abatement 

Overplus on Tax Sales 

Police 

Printing and Stationery 

Property and Debt Balance 

Public Buildings Construction: — 

Contagious Disease Hospital 

Health Department 

High School Building . 

Luther V. Bell School Fire Escapes 
Public Buildings Maintenance: — 

City Hall 

Health Department 

Highways . . . - . 

Police 



41 10 

482 37 

741 25 

3,351 18 

484 36 

6 74 

5,314 58 

3,901,675 72 

2,258 36 

1,264 81 

6,320 99 

3,700 40 

3,408 13 

762 12 

279,452 05 



Truck and Chemi 



Streets 



$16 02 


412 95 


13 53 


818 25 


123 60 


24,540 00 


430 01 


11 00 


81 


54 61 


150 00 


1,510.000 00 


977 30 


8,041 98 


20 67 


4.646 56 


304 86 


15,544 17 


34 47 


44 80 


14 


7 32 


11,770 67 


191 57 


2,546 09 


118 13 


658 31 


40 95 


2,391,675 72 


3,012 53 


10 21 


23,462 56 


784 81 


356 61 


' 110 70 


110 06 


512 92 



Amounts carried forward 



$4,381,267 20 $4,001,504 S9 



138 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward . . ' . . $4,38,1,267 20 

Public Grounds 

Public Library 

Sewer Department 
Public Grounds ... 
Public Library, Isaac Pitman Fund, Art 
Public Library, Isaac Pitman Fund, Poetry 
Public Library, Isaac Pitman Fund, Income, Art 
Public Library, Isaac Pitman Fund, Income, Poetry 

Reduction of Funded Debt 

Redemption of Tax Liens 
School Teachers' Salaries 
Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Sewers Construction 
Sewers Maintenance 
Sidewalks Construction 
Sidewalks Maintenance 
Street Lights . 
Sundry Persons 

Support of Poor, Miscellaneous 
Excise Tax .... 
Temporary Loans . 



$4,001,504 89 

63 36 

810 78 

43 78 

12 64 

4,251 66 

1,062 92 

84 45 

58 39 

10.851 39 

53 97 

5.325 88 

6 78 

4,711 52 

1 72 

739 75 

6 
109 
524 21 
820 04 
223 01 
350,000 00 



95 
11 



$4,381,267 20 $4,381.267 20 



APPENDIX TO TKEASUKEK AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 139 



APPROVAL OF TREASURER'S REPORT. 

In Committee on Finance, February 8, 1906. 
To the Board of Aldermen of Somerville: — 

The committee on finance, to which was referred the report of the 
treasurer and collector of taxes for the year 1905, reports that, in con- 
junction with the auditor, it has examined and audited the books and 
accounts of the treasurer and collector of taxes for the year ending 
December 31, 1905, and in the manner prescribed by section 7 of chapter 
4 of the Revised Ordinances of 1900. 

A careful comparison has been made with the books of the city 
auditor and with financial statements received from the several com- 
mittees, boards, and officers of the city accountable for the use of the 
city funds. 

The cash account has been verified by actual count of the cash on 
hand, and the balances shown to be in the banks of deposit have been 
confirmed by the officials of the banks. 

The committee reports that no errors were discovered in the ac- 
counts and books of the treasurer and collector, and recommends that 
his report be accepted and printed in the annual reports of 1905. 

Sii^NEY B. Keene, 1 Committee 

William A. Flaherty, I 
E. H. Spaulding, p.^^^^^^ 

Zebedee E. Cliff, J 

In Board of Aldermen, February 8, 1906. Accepted. 

Frederic W. Cook, City Clerk. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COfiniTTEE. 



School Committee Rooms, December 29, 1905. 
Ordered, that the annual report of the Superintendent be 
adopted as the annual report of the Board of School Committee, 
it being understood that such adoption does not commit the 
Board to the opinions or recommendations made therein ; that it 
be incorporated in the reports of the City Officers ; and that 1,000 
copies be printed separately. 

G. A. South WORTH, 

Secretary of School Board. 




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SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 1905. 



Frederick A. P. Fiske, 




Chairman 


George E. Whitaker, 


Members. 


Vice-Chairman 




EX-OFFICIIS. 


Term expires 
January. 


Leonard B. Chandler, 


Mayor, 45 Jaques street. 


1906 


John J. Higgins, Pres. Board of Aldermen, 10 Dartmouth street. 1906 




ward one. 




Dr. Henry F. Curtis, 


145 Perkins street. 


1906 


WilliaiyI W. Kennard, 


15 Hathorn street. 
WARD TWO. 


1907 


Daniel H. Bradley, 


19 Concord avenue. 


1906 


John H. O'Neil, 


44 Oak street. 
WARD THREE. 


1907 


George E. Whitaker, 


75 Walnut street. 


1906 


Wilbur S. Clarke, 


40 Vinal avenue. 

WARD FOUR. 


1907 


Dr. George W. W. Whiting, 282 Broadway. 


1906 


William P. Jones, 


13-A Maple avenue. 

WARD FIVE. 


1907 


QUINCY E. Dickerman, 


85 Central street. 


1906 


J. Walter Sanborn, 


183 Central street. 

WARD SIX. 


1907 


Frederick A. P. Fiske, 


44 Cherry street. 


1906 


Charles H. Hood, 


2 Benton road. 

WARD SEVEN. 


1907 


Dr. George C. Mahoney, 


415 Highland avenue. 


1906 


Mrs. Henrietta B. H. Attwood, 18 Herbert street. 


1907 



The Committee holds its regular meetings on the last Monday 
evening of each month, except July, August, and December, at 8.15 
o'clock. The last meeting of the year is held on the Friday next pre- 
ceding the first Monday of January. 

Superintendent of Schools, 

Gordon A. Southworth. 

Ofifice: City Hall Annex, Highland avenue. 

Residence: 40 Greenville street. 

The Superintendent's ofifice will be open from 8 to 12 and from 1.30 
to 5; Saturdays, 8 to 10, His ofifice hours are from 4 to 5 on school days 
and 8 to 9 on Saturdays. 

Office telephone, 314; house telephone, 12. 

Cora S. Fitch, Superintendent's clerk, 82 Munroe street 



STANDING COMMITTEES, 1905. 



High Schools.— Whiting, Mahoney, Curtis, O'Neil, Clarke, Sanborn,. 
Fiske. 

LATIN, ENGLISH. 

District (or Ward) I.— Curtis, Kennard, Jones. 

PRESCOTT, HANSCOM, DAVIS, BENNETT. 

District (or Ward) IL— Bradley, O'Neil, Curtis. 

KNAPP, PERRY, BAXTER. 

District (or Ward) III.— Whitaker, Clarke, O'Neil. 

POPE, BELL, CUMMINGS. 

District (or Ward) IV. — Whiting, Jones, Higgins. 

EDGERLY, GLINES. 

District (or Ward) V. — Dickerman, Sanborn, Chandler. 

FORSTER, BINGHAM. 

District (or Ward) VI. — Fiske, Hood, Dickerman. 

CARR, MORSE, PROCTOR, DURELL, BURNS, BROWN. 

District (or Ward) VII.— Mahoney, Mrs. Attwood, Fiske. 

HIGHLAND, HODGKINS, LINCOLN, LOWE. 

Additional School Accommodations. — Hood, Sanborn, Curtis, Bradley,. 

Whitaker, Whiting, Mahoney, Chandler, Higgins. 
Evening Schools. — Fiske, Whitaker, Jones. 
Finance. — Curtis, Hood, Dickerman, Chandler, Higgins. 
Industrial Education. — Clarke, Dickerman, Mrs. Attwood. 
Music. — Mrs. Attwood, Whiting, Dickerman. 
Private Schools. — Mahoney, O'Neil, Whiting. • 

Repairs of School Buildings. — Bradley, Kennard, Mahoney. 
Rules and Regulations. — O'Neil, Jones, Fiske. 
Salaries. — Whitaker, Sanborn, Fiske. 
Supplies. — Sanborn, Hood, Clarke. 
Text-books and Courses of Study. — Dickerman, Whitaker, Kennard,. 

Bradley, Jones, Hood, Mrs. Attwood. 
Vacation Schools. — ^Jones, Kennard, Bradley. 
Note. — The member first named is chairman. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



To the School Committee of Somerville : — 

I herewith submit my thirteenth annual report. During 
the thirty-four years of city history, I find that on only three oc- 
casions has the school board accompanied the report of the 
superintendent of schools by a report of its own. Hence that 
official is compelled to write with sufficient fulness to enable the 
citizens of Somerville to judge intelligently whether the public 
schools are being managed wisely and with due regard to the 
important interests involved. It should be distinctly understood 
that the opinions and judgments expressed are those of the 
superintendent only, and do not necessarily reflect the senti- 
ments of the committee or commit that body in any way to any 
line of action. 

I shall try to make the report as brief as possible. 

First of all, attention is called to the following 

Summary of Statistics, 

which will be considered in detail in the following pages : — 

United States census, 1890 40,117 

State census, 1895 52,200 

United States census, 1900 61,643 

State census, 1905 69,272 

Children between five and fifteen years of age, October, 

1904, by school census 11,941 

Children between five and fifteen years of age, October, 

1905, by school census 12,173 

Increase 232 

2.— SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 

1904. 1905. Increase.. 

Number of school buildings 25 26 1 

Number of classrooms 260 269 9 

Valuation of school property $1,365,509 

3 — TEACMEKS. 

1904. 1905. Increase. 

In high schools 48 48 

In grammar schools 152 153 1 

In primary schools 97 99 2 

In kindergartens 8 8 

Total in elementary schools 257 260 3 

Special 7 7 

Total 312 315 3, 

4.— ATTENDANCE FOR YEAR. 

1904. 1905. Increase; 

Entire enrollment for the year 13,804 14,296 492 

Average number belonging 11,094 11,543 449 

Average number attending 10,422 10,897 475. 

Per cent, of daily attendance 93.9 94.4 0.5 

High school graduates 179 211 32 

Grammar school graduates 512 606 94 



I 



144 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



5.— ATTENDANCE IN DECEMBER. 

1904. 1905. 

Whole number attending 13,506 13,882 

In private schools 1,719 1,764 

In public schools 11,787 12,'ll8 

In high schools 1,233 1,361 

In elementary schools 10,357 10,562 

In kindergarten 197 195 

In first grade 1,586 1,581 

In second grade 1,424 1,456 

In third grade 1,279 1,336 

In fourth grade 1,267 1,274 

In fifth grade 1,203 1,189 

In sixth grade 1,114 1,152 

In seventh grade 1,003 967 

In eighth grade 851 917 

In ninth grade 630 690 



Increase. 

376 

45 

331 

128 

205 

—2 

—5 

32 

57 

7 

—14 

38 

—36 

66 

60 



6.— COST OF SCHOOL HAINTENANCE. 

1904. 1905. Increase. 

Salaries of teachers $250,580.68 $254,697.12 $4,116.44 

Salaries of officers 4,900.00 4,900.00 0.00 

Cost of books and supplies... 21,411.25 20,136.82 —1,274.43 

Cost of light 1,435.70 4,344.95 2,909.25 

Cost of janitors' services 22,024.21 21,949.25 —74.96 

Cost of fuel 15,315.30 15,166.43 —148.87 

Telephones 236.60 482.26 245.66 

Total cost of day and evening 

schools 315,903.74 321,676.83 5,773.09 

Per capita cost 28.48 27.87 —0.61 

Cost of high school instruc- 
tion 54,653.17 57,011.15 2,357.98 

Per capita cost 47.20 45.79 —1.41 



7.— MISCELLANEOUS. 

1904. 1905. 

Paid for new school 

buildings $23,703.11 $51,987.40 

Repairs and permanent 

improvements 18,208.97 8,305.48 

Total school expendi- 
tures 357,815.82 381,969.71 

Valuation of city 58,056,700.00 59,146,600.00 

Number of dollars spent 
to maintain schools 
out of every $1,000 
of valuation 5.44 5.44 

Number of dollars spent 
for all school pur- 
poses out of every 
$1,000 of valuation.. 6.16 b.4b 



Increase. 

$28,284.29 

—9,903.49 

24,153,89 
1,089,900.00 



0.00 



0.30 



Existing Accommodations. For several years the annual in- 
crease of school population in our city has been sufificient to fill 
an eight-room school building. The regular yearly addition to 
our school accommodations was made this year m the form of a 
nine-room building located on Hudson street, in the rear of the 



SCHOOL DEPAKTMENT. 145 

Armory, and named the George O. Proctor school, in honor of 
one of our highly esteemed mayors. 

This addition to our school buildings, without being ornate 
or extravagant, is one of the best. Thorough in its construction, 
pleasing in its architectural effects, convenient in all its arrange- 
ments, quietly located, it fully answers all the demands of a 
modern school. The heating and ventilation are perfect; the 
sanitary requirements are fully met; and the schoolrooms are 
•ample in size and well lighted. Closets and book-rooms for 
storage and principal's and teachers' rooms are all that could be 
•desired. Originally planned as an eight-room building, it was 
possible to provide a ninth room seating thirty-five pupils with- 
out additional expense. The cost of the building was $41,029.16. 

Eight rooms were occupied in September, relief being thus 
.afiforded to the Morse, Burns, Brown, and Carr schools. 
Seventy-five pupils living in the immediate vicinity of the school 
were transferred thereto from the Forster. 

Miss Nora F. Byard, formerly principal of the Bingham, 
and for the last twelve years principal of the Durell, was given 
charge of the new school. Six of her seven assistants are all 
•experienced teachers transferred from other schools in the city. 
The ninth room in the building will be occupied next September. 

The following is a brief sketch of the gentleman for whom 
the school is named : — 

George O. Proctor was born in Rockingham, Vt., February 23, 1847. 
He was brought up on the farm, and received his education in the pubHc 
schools of that town and at the academy at Chester, Vt. After working 
' in a store, he became engaged in farming and lumbering for five years. 
In 1874 he came to Boston and formed a partnership with his brother 
in the grain and hay business. Later they removed to Cambridge. In 
1877 he came with his family to Somerville. 

Mr. Proctor served in the common council in 1887 and 1888, the 
second year as president. In 1892 and 1893 he represented the city in 
the legislature. He was mayor of the city in 1898 and 1899. 

Mr. Proctor was pre-eminently a business mayor, bringing to the 
office the experience and capacity of a many-sided man of affairs. After 
one year as chief executive under the old charter, his was the important 
task, under the new charter, of completely re-organizing the great mass 
of city business. The re-organization was brought about by_ Mayor 
Proctor with a minimum of friction and a greatly increased efficiency of 
the whole municipal service. 

No mayor ever worked more unselfishly for the advancement of the 
interests of the city than Mayor Proctor. The esteem in which he is still 
held is shown by the action of the city government of 1904 in naming the 
new school on Hudson street the "George O. Proctor Schoo\."—Somcr- 
ville Journal. 

Length of the School Year. It will be remembered that a 
rule of the board provides that the length of the summer vacation 
shall be determined annually at the February meeting. This 
year the vacation extended from noon of June 28 to September 
6. Theoretically, the schools have been in session 39.1 weeks. 
This time has been shortened by the loss of eight sessions on 



146 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



account of legal holidays, two sessions for the teachers' conven- 
tion, three sessions for the Thanksgiving recess, and ten sessions 
lost through stormy weather. The schools then have kept a 
total of thirty-seven weeks, lacking one day. In the aggregate, 
120 sessions of single classes have been lost for various reasons! 
Eighty classes have been dismissed at various times on account 
of cold rooms ; six sessions have been lost for election purposes ;. 
and thirty-four on account of infectious disease. Although the 
financial loss by these dismissals is only $200, the interruption to 
school work is a matter so serious that such dismissals should 
be reduced to an absolute minimum. It will be seen that the 
majority of them could have been avoided by the exercise of 
proper care and foresight. 

School Population. The annual census of children of school 
age which the public statutes require us to take shows this year 
more accurate results than last year. The following table pre- 
sents the comparative results : — 

1905. 1904. Change. 

Ward 1.... 1,929 1,866 +63 

2 2,536 2,546 —10 

3 1,100 975 +125 

4 1,042 926 +116 

5 1,911 1,869 +42 

6 1,972 1,710 +262 

7 1,479 1,416 +63 

Total 11,969 11,308 +661 

It will be seen that there appears to have been a net in- 
crease of 661 in the number of children between five and fifteen 
years of age. This increase is distributed among all the wards 
excepting ward two, which appears to have lost ten. The 
number of pupils accounted for in public and private schools on 
October 1 showed a net increase of 232, as compared with 
similar records of the previous year. At the present time, how- 
ever, December 15, the school records show that 12,118 children 
are connected with the public schools, an increase of 331 as com- 
pared with the membership December, 1904. 

An important change in the compulsory school attendance 
laws was made by the last legislature. After January 1, 1906, 
"every child under sixteen years of age who cannot read at sight 
and write legibly simple sentences in the English language shall 
attend some public day school in the city or town in which he 
resides during the entire time the public day schools are in ses- 
sion." There are numbers of illiterate children fourteen and 
fifteen years old in Somerville to whom this statute applies. It 
will be difificult to secure their attendance at school, for our ex- 
perience in enforcing the attendance of illiterate minors at the 
evening school shows^ that this class will use all means in their 
power to elude the vigilance of attendance officers. The law im- 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 14 1' 

poses a fine of $50 upon all who employ such illiterates while 
the public schools aie in session. A strenuous effort will be 
made to enforce the regular attendance of this class. Working 
certificates cannot be given to them. These children, however, 
cannot advantageously enter any existing classes in the schools, 
and some provision must be made in a central locality for their 
instruction. A teacher of exceptional skill and experience in 
this line of work will be needed. 

This law and that requiring the attendance upon evening 
schools of all illiterate minors are well-designed attempts to 
counteract the effect of the immigration of uneducated foreigners. 
If it is impossible to stem the tide or to regulate its flow, no pains 
must be spared to qualify these people for intelhgent citizenship 
by every means in our power. Next to greed of money and 
office, ignorance is the nation's most portentous menace. The 
children of these foreigners readily learn lessons of patriotism 
and of fealty to their adopted country. An Italian child in one 
of our schools, when shown an American and an Italian flag, 
said with evident pride, ''This is my father's flag, but that is my 
flag." No serious apprehension need be felt with regard to the 
children that come under the influence of the public schools. 
The danger will come from their un-Americanized elders. 

The question of raising the compulsory school age from 
fourteen to fifteen has recently been very carefully discussed by 
the State Board of Education. While there are many strong 
reasons for such increase, the board decided that it would be 
unwise to make any change in existing laws at the present time, 
for the following reasons : — 

''The board reports that it does not consider it feasible or 
desirable to raise the age limit for compulsory school attendance 
from fourteen to fifteen for reasons that a large majority of chil- 
dren in their fifteenth year are now in school ; that of those who 
have been withdrawn a large proportion have acquired a fair 
amount of education ; that others are so disposed towards school 
as not to be likely to reap much advantage from continued at- 
tendance ; that most of those who have been withdrawn are aid- 
ing in the family support, and that this assistance is needed in a 
majority of cases ; and that to raise the school age would in- 
crease the difficulty of the enforcement of the law." 

The number of children who drop out from our schools to 
go to work is increasing year by year. During 1905 we have 
issued 329 age and schooling certificates. Last year 250 were 
issued. We "have also given to minors sixteen years of age or 
over about 500 certificates stating that the applicant is able to 
read and write English. Most of these have been graduates of 
our grammar or high schools. Now and then a college graduate 
has applied. If some other way of catching illiterate minors 
could be devised, it would save school superintendents a large 
amount of what appears to be unnecessary trouble. 



^^8 ANNtJAL Reports. 

Additional Accommodations, High Schools. When the Eng- 
lish high school was opened ten years ago, it was thought that 
provision had been made to accommodate high school pupils for 
•at least ten years. It became apparent, however, seven years 
since that if Somerville made provision for high school students 
€qual to the needs and to the importance of the work to be done, 
additional accommodations must be immediately provided. 
Since that time the question has been under discussion. Various 
plans have been suggested, none of which have proved feasible. 
Meanwhile the number of high school students has multiplied rap- 
idly, the schools have risen in popular appreciation, and existing 
accommodations long since were outgrown. On seven distinct 
occasions appeals for relief have been made to the city govern- 
ment, accompanied by recommendations of what seemed to the 
school committee the best plan for providing for the present and 
the future. The first of these recommendations contemplated 
the addition of wings to the English building. The remaining: 
six emphasized the idea of a new and separate structure for the 
accommodation of the Latin school, with additions and exten- 
sions that would eventually provide for the relief of the Engli3h 
school. The plans suggested by the school board have in- 
volved an encroachment, as some are pleased to term it, upon 
Central Park, and they have also involved the expenditure of 
sums of money ranging from $150,000 to $300,000. There has 
been no time when the views of the school board and the senti- 
ment of the pubhc could be made to harmonize with the state of 
city finances and the opinions of those upon whom we depend 
for the construction of school buildings. 

The situation having, however, become so urgent as to 
admit of no longer delays, independently of the school board, 
and contrary to its oft-renewed recommendations, a plan of relief 
was adopted that provides (1) an addition to the present Latin 
building, and (2) the addition of a wing or wings to the English 
building. The first part of this plan is now being executed, and 
an addition which may contain eight classrooms and an equal 
number of recitation rooms is being made to the northerly end 
of the Latin building. This is to be connected by a covered 
passageway with the English building, in the expectation that 
the annex will be used conjointly by the two schools. Any relief 
of the no longer bearable congestion in the English school is 
welcome, and it may seem ungrateful to complain of its in- 
adequacy. Due regard for the present and future needs of the 
schools, however, compels us to show the necessity for the im- 
mediate carrying out of the second part of the plan by the en- 
largement of the English building. . 

Whatever else may be done, the Latin school must find its 
home for a generation to come in the enlarged building. From 
the very outset, such parts should be taken and so fitted up as to 
fulfill as far as possible the urgent demands that have so long 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 119 

been made for this school. Somerville does not ask luxuries or 
needless frills, either in school buildings or in schools. It does, 
however, claim, and with right, that its school buildings shall be 
healthful, comfortable, convenient, and so arranged as to secure 
the best results with the least expenditure of time and labor. 
The Latin school requires, and therefore must have, the exclu- 
sive use of the old building and the two upper floors of the 
annex. Of course the assembly hall will be used by both schools. 
The purposes for which the various rooms thus assigned to the 
Latin school would be used are as follows : — 

(1) There can be no question that the underground rooms 
originally fitted up as physical and chemical laboratories, and 
more recently used in part for recitation purposes, should be 
abandoned. Originally constructed when science held a very 
subordinate place in the school curriculum, they are wholly in- 
adequate for this purpose at the present time. The rooms are 
poorly heated, ventilated, and lighted, and should be at once and 
permanently abandoned for use for any school purpose excepting 
storage. These rooms properly fitted up would be very useful 
for the storage of books and supplies, either for the high schools 
or for the school department in general. The laboratories 
would be transferred to the two rooms in the third story of the 
old building on the Highland-avenue front. One of these rooms 
should be fitted as a physical laboratory, and the other as a 
chemical laboratory. The question will be at once raised 
whether the laboratories in the English school are not sufficient 
for the entire plant. Why have laboratories in duplicate? The 
answer is that the laboratories in the English building were made 
for a school of 600, and for such a school are admirable in size 
and equipment, but laboratories sufficient for 600 are wholly in- 
adequate for fifteen or eighteen hundred. Even now not all 
pupils who wish to pursue the study of chemistry can be accom- 
modated under existing conditions. It is not feasible to remove 
or remodel the present laboratories so that their capacity may 
be adequately increased. Laboratories, therefore, in the Latin 
building are indispensable. 

.(2) One of the rooms adjoining the principal's office must 
be taken for a library and reference room. It is impossible to 
furnish proper reference books for each of a dozen classrooms. 
They must be collected at some central point, and conveniences 
for their consultation provided. Such a room has long been an 
urgent need of the Latin school. Library methods are more and 
more being employed in modern education, and conveniences 
therefor are necessary. 

This room might also serve as a reception room for callers. 
Private interviews with pupils and parents are very often neces- 
sary in a large high school. Now callers are obliged to wait in 
the corridors or in one of the classrooms, and some better pro- 
vision should be made for them. 



150 



ANNUAL REFOHTS. 



(3) The decision to provide an assembly hall on the third 
floor has been rendered absolutely necessary by the demands of 
the situation. At the present time there is no room in the Latin 
building, nor will there be in the annex, in which the senior class 
or any other class can be assembled. There is no room in which 
the music teacher can work to any advantage. An assembly hall 
in a high school is a sme qua non, and probably no high school- 
house constructed within fifteen years can be found anywhere in 
the country that is without one. In this hall the Latin school 
may be assembled when necessary, and the English school can 
be accommodated in it in two sections. Such a hall is also 
greatly needed for general school purposes. There certainly 
should be some room in some school building in a city like Som^- 
erville in which all the teachers of the schools can be gathered 
at one time. On four occasions we have found it necessary this 
year to use church buildings or public halls for this purpose. 

(4) In the reconstruction of the Latin building, ten class- 
rooms have been provided, four of which seat thirty pupils or 
less. If three of these rooms are taken, as they must be, for the 
purposes indicated, seven classrooms remain which will seat 250 
pupils. There will be four classrooms on the two upper floors 
of the annex seating 200 pupils. This furnishes eleven class- 
rooms that will accommodate 450 pupils, which is practically the 
present membership of the school. Two recitation rooms have 
been provided in the old building, and four may be had in the 
annex. This gives six recitation rooms, and makes the teacher 
capacit)^ of the enlarged Latin building seventeen, and provides 
for a class unit of twenty-eight. 

It will be seen that this disposition of the rooms provides for 
the Latin school as it exists to-day. As it grows, additional 
rooms must be taken on the second and first floors as needed. 
With this arrangement, while the Latin school will by no means 
be housed as are similar schools in other cities, provision will be 
made for the convenient working of the school, and its efficiency 
greatly increased. 

The needs of the Latin school will not be properly set forth 
unless something is said about a matter closely connected with 
the physical well-being of its students. Somerville does nothing 
in a methodical way towards physical training for the members 
of the high schools. We smile complacently upon school ath- 
letics, and rejoice' when our side wins. They are, however, 
sporadic, and, in the opinion of many, objectionable. They do 
nothing for the great mass of pupils unless possibly to give them 
an opportunity to officiate as ''rooters." The responsibility that 
rests upon school authorities to care for the bodies of children, 
as well as for their minds, is coming to be widely recognized. 
Modern school buildings are provided with gymnasiums, exer- 
cises therein being regular and compulsory. ^ I see no immediate 
opportunity to provide what is needed in this direction. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMEXT. 151 

More important, more urgent, and more easily attainable, 
however, are suitable lunch-rooms for the 1,500 pupils assembled 
on the hill. All will concede that, between a hasty breakfast and 
a cold dinner at two o'clock, a light, hygienic luncheon is an es- 
sential to health. There is, to be sure, already an alleged lunch- 
room in the basement of the English building. It is in every 
way unattractive and inadequate. If similar lunch privileges 
were provided in the homes of pupils, the dining table would be 
set in the cellar. A lunch-room should be neat, well lighted, 
ample in size, and provided with kitchen facilities where soups 
and other suitable viands may be prepared. There should be 
•chairs and tables, and the courtesies and refinements of home 
should be observed. The menu should be prescribed by proper 
authorities ; the food should be carefully prepared and tastefully 
served. The expense should be reduced to the minimum. Such 
a lunch-room would be generously patronized by pupils who now 
go into neighboring restaurants in all sorts of weather, or else 
abstain altogether. The lower story of the new annex would 
afford a suitable place for such a room. Probably the suggestion 
that it be used for this purpose would be met with the charge of 
extravagance, but the patrons of the schools would not be found 
among those making this criticism. No more popular provision 
for constantly-recurring needs could be made. Probably other 
demands will be thought more pressing, but something of this 
sort must be provided at an early date. As an illustration of 
up-to-date methods, the new high schoolhouse in Rochester, 
N. Y., is provided with a lunch-room containing 600 octagonal 
tables and 1,200 chairs. One thousand students are fed daily. 

Accommodations for the English School. Before considering 
what is requisite for the proper housing and conduct of the Eng- 
lish school, it should be remarked that there are a thousand 
young men and women whose educational needs are to be met 
almost entirely in this school, not in higher institutions. It is 
here that they get their equipment for business pursuits and for 
life. Certainly the training and education of no other class of 
pupils is more important. For the support of the English school 
the city pays nearly $50,000 a year. Not only the interests of 
the pupils, but economy of expenditure demands the outlay of 
this money in a way to secure the largest possible dividend. It 
is a grave mistake to regard this school as secondary in value or 
importance to any other in the city. 

In September, 1906, this school will contain a thousand 
pupils. At the present time there are 920. The normal capacity 
•of the building is 600. All manner of devices and every inch of 
space have been used to provide for the surplus 320. Only the 
most skilful planning and the spirit of mutual accommodation on 
the part of teacher and pupil could have solved the problem in 
any measure. The present plan is to put 200 of these thousand 



1^^ ANNUAL REPORTS. 

pupils into the Latin school annex. Their recitations will be 
now in one building and then in the other. It is impossible to 
select any 200 or, even 100 of the pupils of this school all of 
whose work could be done in the new building. Frequent trips 
from one building to the other will be unavoidable. This colo- 
nizing, however, still leaves 800 pupils in the English school 
building. The present ingenious devices may still be used to 
provide them seats, but something more must be done for these 
pupils than simply to find places for them to sit. It goes without 
saying that a building planned in its rooms, laboratories, and 
general equipment for 600 is wholly inadequate to accommodate 
a thousand, or even 800. 

A thousand pupils should need forty teachers. There are 
now twenty-six working rooms for teachers in the English build- 
ing. Add a possible eight in the Latin building, and we are still 
six rooms short of the number needed. Moreover, certain de- 
partments are now crowded for room. This is true of the com- 
mercial department. The bookkeeping room should be enlarged 
by taking in the present typewriting room. This wholly inade- 
quate room should be replaced by another one of the proper size. 
The chemical laboratory is filled to repletion. The present three 
rooms obtained by changes in the lecture hall should be given 
up and the hall restored to its proper uses. The manual training 
department is very unsatisfactorily provided for. The library 
and reference room should be made larger by the addition of the 
book-room and a teachers' room. Rooms should be provided for 
the storage of books and supplies. The principal's office should 
be transferred to the first floor and made larger. A reception 
room should be provided for reasons already given. There 
should be toilet rooms on each floor. Adequate and secure 
clothes closets are needed. All these things and others that 
might be named call emphatically for the immediate carrying out 
of the second feature of the general plan for high school enlarge- 
ment. Steps should be taken to add one or two wings to the 
rear of the English school. They should be carefully planned 
with the exact needs of the school in mind. Provision should be 
made for 1,400 pupils, for eventually no part of the English 
school can be accommodated in the enlarged Latin building. 
It is not just to this large body of students, nor to the teachers 
of the school, nor to the general public to delay any longer to 
provide for this school what it needs. It has been overcrowded 
for years, and no attempt should be made to force the school to 
continue under existing conditions simply because by great efifort 
and sacrifice it has succeeded in doing so in the past. 

Additional Accommodations, Elementary Schools* We group 
the Prescott, Hanscom, Davis, and Edgerly schools together, 
as they are located in the same general section, and are closely 
interrelated in their classification. These schools at the present 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 153 

time contain 1,630 pupils in thirty-four schoolrooms, an average 
of forty-eight to a room. The conditions that prevail are prac- 
tically identical with those of a year ago. There are 100 children 
in the first grade on half-time in the Prescott school. To relieve 
the crowded conditions, it was found necessary in September to 
transfer fifty pupils from the Edgerly to the Glines school, where 
there was room in abundance. As in most cases of the kind, 
this occasioned some protests and remonstrances for which no 
good reason existed. Whatever may be said about the distance 
traveled by primary school children, no objection can properly 
be made to children in the sixth grade and above walking a half- 
mile to reach school. After careful consideration of the needs 
and the best methods of supplying them in this section, I renew 
the recommendation that has been made for several years that 
an addition of two rooms be made to the Hanscom school. 
Such an addition was contemplated when the building was 
erected, and it can be made at the minimum of expense. There 
is no prospect of any early increase in the population of this 
section, and doubtless the addition proposed would suffice for 
several years. 

In ward two there are three schools, — ^the Baxter, Knapp, 
and Perry, — containing at the present time 1,120 pupils in 
twenty-four schoolrooms, an average of forty-seven to a room. 
Some of the children resident in this ward attend schools in 
wards one and three. No need exists for any increase in the 
school accommodations in ward two. 

Ward three. In considering the needs of this ward, we 
group the Bennett, Pope, Bell, and Cummings schools. These 
schools have at the present time a membership of 1,756, in forty 
schoolrooms, an average of forty-four to a room. School accom- 
modations in this section are ample to meet all requirements. 

Wards four and five. The Glines, Forster, and Bingham 
schools are closely connected. They contain an aggregate of 
forty-eight rooms, occupied at the present time by 2,037 pupils. 
This is an average of forty-three pupils to a room. In the Glines 
school there are eighty pupils on half-time. The transfer of 
seventy-five pupils from the Forster to the Proctor school left 
some of the rooms in the former school only partly filled. This 
is notably true of the two first-grade rooms, Avhich contain only 
thirty-one pupils each. It has been found practically impossible 
to combine classes between the Glines and the Forster. The 
reason for this is that the children that it might be desirable to 
transfer live too far away from the school which they would enter 
to justify the change. It is probable that another year some such 
disposition may be made of the pupils in these schools as to ren- 
der half-time attendance needless and to save the services of at 
least one teacher. 

Ward six. In its public school population, this is the larg- 
est district in the city. It contains the Carr, Morse, Durell, 



154 ANNUAL REPOETS. 

Proctor, Burns, and Brown schools. The pupilage of these 
schools at present is 2,4,72, distributed in fifty-four schoolrooms, 
an average of forty-six to a room. By the opening of the Proc- 
tor school, the half-time conditions that had long affected 300 
pupils were removed, and all pupils are attending on full-time. 

The classification in this district is not wholly satisfactory. 
We are obliged to use a very small room in the Carr containing 
only twenty-four first-grade pupils. For these we employ a full- 
priced teacher. There is no opportunity to dispose of these 
pupils in other buildings. There is neither room for them nor do 
they reside in a locality from which they could well be trans- 
ferred. This is an unfortunate and uneconomical condition for 
which I have sought relief in vain. 

There will be an inevitable crowding of the schools in this 
district in the immediate future. Next September we shall need 
to open the ninth room in the Proctor school. The district of 
which the Brown school is the natural centre is rapidly filling 
up, and the school will be overrun in September, 1906. I renew 
the recommendation made in former reports for the imme- 
diate enlargement of this building by the addition of four or 
eight rooms. Four rooms can be added without the purchase 
of extra land. Four more rooms and an assembly hall could be 
provided by the purchase of land on the southerly side. While 
the addition is being made, it should be large enough to meet 
future demands. The school is admirably located for another 
grammar school centre, and in the not distant future a build- 
ing of the capacity indicated would be easily filled. In the con- 
struction of the addition, the assembly hall should be a prominent 
feature. There is constant call in existing schools for a room in 
which the entire school may at times be assembled. There are 
gatherings of parents and teachers for which such a room is 
needed. Other municipalities provide assembly halls in their 
grammar schools. Why should we not do so? 

Ward seven. This ward contains four schools, — the High- 
land, Hodgkins, Lincoln, and Lowe. Thirty-eight rooms in 
these buildings are at present in use. Their 1,742 occupants 
number forty-six pupils to a room. Two of these rooms in the 
Hodgkins building are temporarily in commission. The ward 
room comfortably accommodates forty-two pupils. A small 
room made last year from a teachers' room and a part of the cor- 
ridor contains twenty-three ninth-grade pupils. As I have said 
before in connection with the Carr school, it is poor economy to 
pay $700 for the instruction of twenty-three pupils, and it^ should 
be done only when a remedy is impossible. The use of this room 
at the present time is unnecessary, for the pupils now occupying 
it could easily be transferred to other rooms, fhis involves the 
forming of a mixed class of eighth and nintl -grade pupils. I 
have tried to secure such an arrangement, but have been unable 
to do so. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 155 

There are 180 ninth-grade pupils in the Highland and Hodg- 
kins schools at present in five rooms. The grade should be 
combined into four rooms, with an average of forty-five pupils 
to a room. The difficulty of doing this lies in the attachment 
that high-grade pupils have for the school which they have long 
attended. To what extent this very natural attachment should 
be recognized in the administration of school afifairs is an open 
•question. The increase in the population of this ward is chiefly 
in the western section. As a result, the Lincoln and the Hodg- 
kins schools are overcrowded, and the overflow must naturally 
go to the Highland school, where there has been this year ample 
room. The sooner the fact is recognized the better, that there 
must be a frequent readjustment of school district lines and a 
transfer of pupils enforced by changes in population of school 
districts. At an early day there must be some increase in school 
accommodations in this ward. As suggested in the last report, 
$36,000 would provide for an addition of six rooms to the Hodg- 
kins school by raising the present structure. This will be the 
natural school centre of this section of the city for years to come. 
If the capacity of the. Lincoln school could be doubled by an ad- 
dition, it would afford the relief needed. It has been suggested 
that a six-room building might be erected on Powder-house 
boulevard. It is, however, very doubtful whether this locality 
will become sufficiently populous to require a building of this 
size. Its pupils would need to be drawn from the immediate vi- 
f^tnity of the Lincoln and Hodgkins schools. 

Reviewing the foregoing recommendations for additional 
school accommodations, I arrange them as to their urgency in 
the following order : — 

(1) An addition to the English high school. 

(3) The enlargement of the Hanscom school. 

(3) The enlargement of the Brown school. 

(-t Some addition to meet the needs in ward seven. 

School Attendance. Fourteen thousand two hundred and 
ninety-six different pupils have been in attendance upon the 
schools during 1905 for a longer or shorter period of time. For 
the sake of uniformity in comparing the cost of schools in the 
different cities and towns, the state authorities have established 
certain rules regulating the membership of the schools. Under 
these rules, a pupil's connection w^ith the school ceases at his 
death, on his removal from the city, by his withdrawal from 
school without intention of returning, or by an absence of ten 
consecutive days from any cause whatever. If we drop from 
the enrollment list names of pupils permanently or temporarily 
absent for any of these reasons, the remainder is the average 
membership of the schools. For 1905 the average membership 
has been 11,495, an increase of 401 for the year. 

Somerville has an exceptionally large number of transient 
pupils who remain in one school for only a part of the year. 



156 



ANNUAL EEPOETS. 



Some of them may be found registered in two or three schools> 
durmg the year. As givmg some idea of these changes, the ioU 
lowing facts are presented: — 

Number entering from schools outside the city 1 273 

Number entering first grade " I'Jgi 

Number that were graduated 'siT 

Number of transfers from one school to another in the city,' 2,381 

We ascertain the average attendance of the schools by tak- 
ing mto account all absences during the membership period. 
This IS the number of pupils that have been present on the 
average every school day during the year. For 1905 this aver- 
age attendance is 10,853, an increase of 431 over 1904. The- 
average attendance is 94.4 per cent, of the average membership.. 
This continued absence of 5.6 per cent, of school children is due 
almost entirely to sickness or absence enforced by quarantine 
rules.^ There have been 430 days lost on account of truancy. 
This is equivalent to the absence of 2.2 children throughout the 
year. As indicative of the willingness of parents to co-operate- 
with the schools, it should be remarked that very few children 
are kept from school except in cases of sickness or urgent neces- 
sity. An exception, however, should be made of parents who 
do not enter their children at school promptly at the opening of 
the school year, and those others who remove them before its- 
close. While this may be a convenience to those whose summer 
residences are out of the city, it often results to the disadvantage- 
of the children themselves, and interferes somewhat with the 
working of the schools. 

Punctuality is one of the school virtues that teachers strive to- 
make habitual in their pupils. The habit of being where one- 
ought to be at a specified time and of doing the thing one ought 
to do just when it ought to be done is of great value in business- 
and out of it. The aggregate number of tardinesses in our 
schools for the year is 3,746. This number may seem large, but 
when distributed among the individual pupils, it shows that each- 
child has been tardy once out of his 1,012 opportunities of being 
so. More than half of these delinquencies are chargable to chil- 
dren in the three primary grades. The responsibility for tardi- 
ness generally rests with the parent. Teachers should discrimi- 
nate carefully in imposing penalties therefor, for while the evil' 
should be restrained, tardiness is fortunately not a capital offence, 
and no general rule should be made in any building concerning 
the matter. Each case should be considered on its merits. 

The dismissal of pupils before the close of the school ses- 
sion is very rarely necessary, and can generally be avoided by 
foresight and planning on the part of parents. In 1905 there- 
were 2,464 dismissals, a number which appears unnecessarily 
large. Teachers very properly hesitate about declining to honor 
calls from parents for dismissal, but all should understand that 



I 



SCHOOL DEPAKTMENT. 15T 

requests of this sort should be proffered only in case of most 
urgent necessity. 

Those of us who have the good fortune to be living in the 
Tnillennium will doubtless hear nothing of corporal punishment 
either in the school or in the home. The necessity for it will 
have ceased to exist. Until that happy period comes, however, 
and so long as human nature is what it is, so long as force is 
needed anywhere to secure compliance with rules and law, so 
long as parental government is weak, and so long as no restraint 
is placed upon wayward children outside of school, both teachers 
and parents will be compelled to resort to this means to secure 
order and obedience. There have been in Somerville schools 
this year 337 cases in which the rod has been used. This is an 
average of little more than one case to a teacher, or one case 
during every 9,000 school sessions. There have been 124 
classes in which there has been no case of corporal punishment 
^during the year. 

On the fifteenth of December, the number of pupils in the 

schools was as follows : — 

1905. 1904. Increase. 

In the Latin school 444 422 22 

In the English school 917 811 106 

In the elementary schools 10,562 10,357 205 

In the kindergartens 195 197 — 2 

A total of 12,118 11.787 331 

Adding to this number the 1,764 pupils in private schools, 
we have 13,882 school children in the city. 

Truancy. The vigilance of teachers and the efficiency of 
the truant ofificer have resulted in what may be considered a 
minimum amount of truancy for a city of the size and location 
of Somerville. The following is the year's record : — 

1904. 1905. Increase. 

Number of visits to schools 429 567 138 

Number of cases investigated 387 514 127 

Number found to be truants 146 150 4 

Number sent to truant school 5 4 — 1 

Paid for board of truants $245.84 $322.14 $76.30 

Teachers. There are 315 teachers in the employ of the city 
at the present time, twenty-seven of whom are men. This does 
not include fifty who are employed in evening schools. The city 
has lost during the year the unusual number of twenty-six teach- 
ers. Eleven of these have resigned to be married ; seven have 
left us to fill more desirable positions in other cities ; seven have 
relinquished teaching altogether for rest or change of occupa- 
tion ; and one has died. Seven of these teachers have served the 
city for a period averaging twenty-five years. Miss Brown, of 
the Prescott, Miss Downes, of the Morse, Miss Hunt, of the 
Knapp, and Miss Schuch, of the Bell school, had served the 
^city faithfully for thirty-seven, thirty-three, thirty-one, and 



158 



ANNUAL EEPORTS 



twenty-three years, respectively. In their retirement from teach- 
ing, they carry with them the gratitude and best wishes of all 
who have been associated with them either officially or as co- 
laborers. 

George E. Nichols, for twenty-eight years the master of 
the Highland school, died in June last, after an illness of several 
months. The witness borne to his character and service as a 
teacher by the school board will be found on another page of 
this report. 

Of the teachers who have resigned during the year, nineteea 
have served the city for an average period of four years and a 
half. 

To replace these losses and to fill new positions, twenty- 
eight teachers have been elected during the year. These new 
teachers have all received professional training. One of them: 
had had only a single year's experience ; four of them had 
taught successfully two years ; the remaining twenty-three w^ere 
tried teachers about whose qualifications there could be no ques- 
tion. They were elected at the maximum salary of the positions- 
which they filled. Four others were employed for a proba- 
tionary period. Thus far their success seems to have justified 
their selection. Of these new teachers, one-third were residents 
of Somerville at the time of their election. 

While the necessity of employing only skilled and experi- 
enced teachers in our schools is growing greater and more appa- 
rent year by year, the difficulty of finding them is constantly in- 
creasing. Everywhere the demand for suitably quahfied teach- 
ers exceeds the supply. The reasons for this are fully set forth 
in the last report of the secretary of the State Board of Educa- 
tion. Fortunately for us, the salaries that we have to offer are 
somewhat larger than those in many other cities in the state. 
In self-defence, however, several of these cities have recently 
raised the salaries of their teachers to our level, and have to this 
extent shortened our sources of supply. However, this difficulty 
in securing good teachers must not lead us to lower our 
standard. The character of the school centres in the teacher^ 
and whatever economies may be practiced in other directions, 
failure here will be disastrous. We mu^t be ready, however, to- 
do something ourselves toward the training of teachers and the 
development in them of those qualities which the best teachers 
must possess. There are available a few normal school gradu- 
ates gifted by nature with an aptitude for teaching. Even 
these, however, should not be employed until they have been 
tested by experience. After service under less trying conditions 
than our schools present to prove their work reasonably success- 
ful, we may well employ them in some of our larger schools, 
where they will be under the training and guidance of masters 
skilled in the work of supervision. Their service should at first 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 159 

be of a probationary character, and their employment made per- 
manent only when their success is beyond question. 

There is always, however, a serious risk in employing resi- 
dent teachers on probation. If they succeed it is all right, but 
if they fall short of the requirement, it is difficult to drop them. 
Social, church, and political influences are sure to be brought to 
bear upon the appointing power to have them retained, whatever 
their qualifications. In this way mediocre or even poor teachers 
may become permanent and unsalutary fixtures in our schools. 
It behooves us, therefore, to adhere firmly to the principle that 
the general interests of the schools should far outweigh all per- 
sonal considerations of every sort. 

In our employment of teachers, we do well to remember 
this statement of the secretary of the State Board of Educa- 
tion: — 

"It should not be overlooked that the most important ele- 
ment in the teacher's qualifications is not to be found in aca- 
demic scholarship, essential as this is, nor in the power to hold 
a school in order, essential, also, as this is, but in the rarer and 
finer power of leading the child to act judiciously, earnestly, and 
advantageously for himself in the enlargement of his executive 
and productive capacity, in the acquisition of knowledge, and 
particularly of those larger underlying principles that enable him 
to classify and utilize knowledge, in the cultivation of a sturdy 
civic spirit, and in the building up of a well-rounded and admir- 
able character." 

Latin School. The Latin school now contains 444 pupils, 

as compared with last year's registration of 422. These are di- 
vided among the classes as follows : — 

1904. 1905. Change. 

Senior 81 93 12 

Junior 93 92 —1 

Sophomore 112 120 8 

Freshman 136 139 3 

The number assigned to a teacher, exclusive of the principal, is 
thirty-seven. 

There has been only one change in the teaching corps dur- 
ing the year. The place left vacant by the resignation of Miss 
Edith M. Walker has been filled by Miss Mav.d M. Cunningham. 
a Wellesley graduate with seven years of successful experience^ 
the last of which was in the Holyoke high school. 

This school has been seriously handicapped by lack of room, 
in which teachers may hear recitations. It was hoped that 
changes in rooms in the building in the summer would provide 
accommodations for at least fourteen teachers. Owing, how- 
ever, to financial stringency, two rooms set apart for recitation 
purposes have not been set off from other rooms by folding par- 
titions, as was planned. This has compelled the use of the base- 
ment recitation room by one teacher, and has restricted the 



•^•^^ ANNUAL REPORTS. 

teaching force to thirteen, inclusive of the principal. Two in- 
experienced student teachers have been employed since the begin- 

3?i ^^ u^^ ^^^°°^ ^^^'' ^^° ^^"^^ ^^^^^ some class instruction 
VVhile this may tide over an exigency, the rehef afforded is in- 
adequate. The numbers in the school and the work to be done 
imperatively demand two, if not three, additional teachers. The 
possibility of getting along w^ithout them should not be enter- 
tained for a moment. Many of the classes are altogether too 
large for thorough instruction. Some of the teachers are over- 
burdened, and it is only by the most strenuous effort that the 
standard of the school is maintained. Just as soon as rooms are 
provided, these additional teachers, who should be experienced 
and perfectly competent women, should be employed. Neglect 
to do this will jeopard the interests of the school. What the ac- 
commodations of the school will be in September, or, at least, 
what they ought to be, has been set forth at some length else- 
where in this report. 

The following shows the numbers pursuing each branch of 
study at date : — 

English 444 French Ill 

History 232 German 185 

Mathematics 444 Greek 121 

Physics 68 Drawing 6 

Latin 438 Chemistry 12 

A general complaint in all high schools is that students enter 
without a definite purpose and without counting the cOst. En- 
countering unforeseen difficulties and somewhat harder work 
than they have been familar with, they drop out after longer or 
shorter periods. This is not as true of schools whose business is 
distinctively to fit for college. In such schools plans are pretty 
well formed, and there is ahead a definite purpose to be accom- 
plished. This is true of the Latin school. Nevertheless, during 
the last six years, one-third of those who have entered have fallen 
by the wayside, leaving only two-thirds to graduate. In contrast 
with this, it may be remarked that during the same period, of 
those entering the English school, only forty-five in every hun- 
dred have remained to graduate. The following table will afford 
an interesting study: — 



SCHOOL DEPAETMENT. 



IGl 



TABLE SHOWINQ L0SSE5 OF CLASSES IN LATIN HIGH SCHOOL EACH YEAR 

SINCE 1897. 





Class 


Class 


Class 


Class 


Class 


Class 


Class 


Class 


Class 


Class 


Membership. 


of 


of 


of 


of 


of 


of 


of 


of 


of 


of 




1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


December 15, 1st year 


79 


89 


77 


64 


103 


Ill 


125 


121 


136 


139 


2nd " . 


67 


80 


73 


47 


93 


97 


106 


112 


120 




3rd " . 


57 


64 


64 


49 


88 


95 


93 


92 






4th " . 


53 


65 


62 


60 


84 


81 


93 








-Graduates 


48 


56 


56 


46 


73 


76 






11.8 




•Loss per cent. 1st year . 


15.2 


10.1 


5.2 


265 


9.7 


12.6 


W.2 


7.4 




2nd " . 


15.0 


20.0 


12.3 


4.3* 


5.4 


2.1 


14.0 


17.9 






3rd " . 


7.0 




3.1 


22.4* 


45 


14.7 


0.0 








" •' 4th " . 


10.4 


13.8 


9.7 


23.3* 


13.1 


6.1 








Total . . . 


39.2 


37.0 


27.3 


28.1 


29.1 


31.5 


... 







*Gain. 

In September next the Latin school should enter upon a 
new career. It should be provided with every facility to accom- 
phsh its work, — rooms, teachers, and appliances. Provision 
should be made to render wholly unnecessary the Friday after- 
noon session, in which the extra time and labor of two teachers 
and of one of the classes have been required. With increased 
accommodations, under the wise leadership of Dr. Baxter, who 
for more than a generation has successfully conducted its affairs, 
and seconded by an enlarged corps of tried helpers, the school 
should continue to hold its place in the very front rank. 

The number of graduates from this school in June last was 
seventy-six. Of these, forty-six entered college and two the 
state normal schools. 

English High School. A year ago, the number of students 
regularly attending this school was 811. This year there are 917, 
an increase of 106. This number is divided among the classes 

as follows: — 

1904. 1905. Change. 

Post-graduate 18 14 —4 

Senior 148 140 —8 

Junior 158 189 -f31 

Sophomore 220 224 -f-4 

Freshman 267 350 +83 

Exclusive of principal and secretary, there are thirty-three 
teachers employed, each having an average of 27.8 pupils under 
instruction. There have been two changes in the teaching corps 
of the school during the year. Miss Harding resigned for ser- 
vice in one of the New York high schools. Her place was taken 
by Miss Ruth Tousey, Tufts, '03. Miss H. Adelaide Hamlin re- 
tires from teaching, her place having been only temporarily filled. 

Notwithstanding the exceptional increase in numbers and 
the crowded condition of all departments, no extra teaching ser- 
vice has been called into requisition. While the teachers have 
labored with customary enthusiasm and ability, several of them 



162 . ANNUAL REPORTS. 

have been overburdened with their tasks. Two or three addi- 
tional teachers must be employed in September, whatever may 
be done earlier. 

There is perhaps little need of adding to what has already 
been said concerning the condition and needs of the EngHsb 
school. For years the capacity of the building has been over- 
taxed, and one device after another has been employed, until at 
last the absolute limit has been reached. As has been shown^ 
the relief afforded by the Latin school annex will be only partial. 
Eight hundred pupils will still remain to be accommodated in a 
building designed for 600. I cannot too urgently present the 
necessity of the addition of a wing to the rear of the westerly end 
of the building, planned as to size and internal arrangements to 
meet at least the present needs of the school. Certainly the work 
done in this school demands that all needful facilities should be 
provided. We have always supplied the needs of the elementary 
schools generously and with commendable promptness, and in 
this respect stand well in comparison with other municipalities. 
When it comes, however, to provision for high school needs, a 
comparison show^s that we stand far below other communities. 
Even when our best has been done, our general high school 
plant will not be all that can be desired. Justice to the school, 
to its teachers, and to the reputation of the city requires that im- 
mediate steps should be taken for the enlargement of the 
building. 

In June the school graduated 135, three of whom entered 
college, six technical schools, and one a normal school. _ The 
curriculum of the school covers twenty-two different subjects of 
studv, all but four of which are elective. These subjects and the 
number of students pursuing each are shown in the following^ 
table :— ' J 

English 923 Mechanical drawing- 276 

j^isl-ory 808 Freehand drawing 468 

Mathematics* 672 Commercial:— 

Chemistry 102 Law ^o 

Astronomy 1*7 Bookkeeping 112 

Physics 57 Stenography 174 

Biology 35 Elocution . . 922 

Physiology 295 Manual training 234 

Latin 127 Penmanship 195 

French ' V 329 Commercial arithmetic. ... 114 

German'".;".*.'.*.".'.'. 97 Typewriting 180 

Physical geography 19 Music y^ii ^ 

As has been remarked, this school suffers from the droppmg 
out of pupils before the completion of the course. Undoubtedly 
the plethoric condition of the school has contributed largely to 
this loss during the last few years. Indeed, it speaks volumes 
for the attractions which the school presents to find that the 
losses are no greater. Students have submitted to many mcon- 
veniences rather than relinquish the advantages of the school. 
Especial efforts have been made by the management of the 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



lG:i 



school this year to overcome the discouragements and obstacles 
incident to the first year in a student's life in a high school by 
rendering especial assistance to individual pupils. The entire 
time of a competent teacher could be advantageously spent in; 
this line of work. The loss of pupils that the school has sus- 
tained for a series of years is shown in the following table ; — 



TABLE SHOWING LOSSES OF CLASSES IN ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL EACH 

YEAR SINCE 1897. 



Membership. 



December 15, 1st year 
2nd " 
3rd " 
4th " 

Graduates 



Loss per cent. 1st year 
2nd " 
3rd " 
4th " 
Total 



Class 


Class 


Class 


Class 


of 


of 


of 


of 


1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


228 


211 


217 


299 


163 


153 


162 


221 


119 


125 


135 


178 


97 


.108 


120 


151 


83 


96 


108 


135 


24.1 


27.5 


25.3 


26.0 


27.0 


18.0 


16.6 


19.5 


18.5 


13.6 


11.1 


15.2 


14.4 


11.1 


10.0 


10.6 


63.6 


54.5 


50.2 


54.8 



Class ' Class 

of I of 
1904. I 1905. 



246 
178 
147 
112 
106 



27.2 
17.4 
23.8 
5.4 
56.9 



261 
214 
180 
148 
135 



18.0 
15.9 

17.8 

8.7 

48.3 



Class 

of 
1906. 



250 
190 
158 
140 



24.0 
16.8 
11.4 



Class 

of 
1907. 



2.52 

220 

187 



12.7 
15.0 



Class 

of 
1908. 



267 
224 



16.1 



Class 

of 
1909. 



350 



Grammar and Primary Schools. A year ago there were in 
these schools 10,357 pupils. To-day there are 10,562, an in- 
crease of 205. They are distributed among the nine grades as 
follows : — 



Grade 1 
2 
3 

4 
5 
6 

7 
8 
9 



1905. 

1,581 

1,456 

1,336 

1,274 

1,189 

1,152 

967 

917 

690 



Total 10,562 



1904. 

1,586 
1,424 
1,279 
1,267 
1,203 
1,114 
1,003 
851 
630 

10,357 



Change. 

—5 
+32 
H-57 

+7 
—14 
+38 
—56 
-\-66 
+60' 



205 



I 



In 1905 the grammar schools graduated '606, ninety-four 
more than the previous year. Of these, 463 entered the high 
schools, 124 going to the Latin school and 339 tO' the English. 
Past experience has led us to expect that about one-half of the 
pupils found at any time in the fourth grade will drop out of 
school before the time of graduation arrives. Tracing the 
numerical history of the class that graduated from the grammar 
schools this year, we find no change in the rule. This class 
started with 1,141 pupils, and lost forty-seven per cent, of this 
number before graduation. The losses in the various grades are 
here shown : — 



164 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TA ^ -io/^r. r Loss. Per Cent. 

December, 1899, fourth grade 1,141 

December, 1900, fifth grade I'lll 30 2.7 

December, 1901, sixth grade 1,038 73 6.4 

December, 1902, seventh grade 932 106 9.3 

December, 1903, eighth grade 751 181 IS^Q 

December, 1904, ninth grade 630 121 10.6 

June, 1905, graduates 606 24 2.1 

September, 1905, entering high school . . 463 143 23.6 

The 329 employment certificates issued have been granted 
to the children who have left the various grades as follows : — 

Grade 3 1 Grade 7 67 Grade 11 2 

" 4 11 " 8 64 " 12 1 

" 5 23 " 9 43 Unclassified ... 45 

" 6 62 "10 10 

The unclassified certificates have been granted mainly to 
illiterate minors. 

Half-time conditions prevail now in only three buildings, — 
the Prescott, Glines, and Hodgkins. The experience of last year 
is corroborative of the fact that when children attend on half-time 
between six and seven per cent, more are left behind to repeat 
the work than in full-time classes. The chief argument for full- 
time sessions rather than half-time comes from parents, the ma- 
jority of whom are anxious that their children should attend 
school all day. Educators are divided in their opinions. There 
are many who claim that three hours or four hours daily are 
enough for first-grade children to be in school. During the rest 
of the day they should be where free muscular activity in the 
open air is possible. In one of our nearby cities, the first grades 
by choice attend only in the forenoon, from nine o'clock until 
twelve. In the afternoon the teachers of these grades spend 
their time in assisting in the higher grades. It is claimed that 
the general average results are favorable. Any loss that may be 
sustained in the first grade by the shortened session is more than 
made up by the service rendered by teachers in the other classes 
in the afternoon. In New York city 70,000 children are com- 
pelled, through lack of sufficient accommodations, to attend for 
a shortened day. There are those that argue that these children 
sufifer little loss, from an educational point of view. When out 
of school, however, they spend their time under conditions that 
neutralize much of the good that they have received from the 
schools. For all such children of the poorer class, the school 
affords a retreat and a protection from injurious influences, and 
the longer time spent therein the better. 

In connection with this subject, it is pertinent to consider 
the question whether we may not raise the'age at which children 
enter the first grade from five years to six, and reduce the ele- 
mentary school period in this way from nine years to eight years. 
It is well known that a nine-year course is the exception and an 
eight-year course the rule, taking the country over. Outside of 
Massachusetts or New England, it is very rarely that the ele- 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 165 

mentary course covers more than eight years. Exclusive of the 
kindergarten, the entering age is six years. Several prominent 
New England cities have recently adopted this age limit. Wher- 
ever the experiment has been tried of thus saving an elementary 
school year, the results have been satisfactory. Pupils graduate 
from the grammar school at about the same age and enter the 
high school in similar numbers under both systems, having ac- 
complished the same amount of work. The work done in the 
first grade with children that are only five years of age can be 
done with children a year older in a much shorter time, and, as 
many claim, more consistently with the natural development of 
their mental and physical powers. During the three primary 
years, whatever is lost by the omission of the present first year 
is fully made up, so that pupils enter upon the higher years of 
the course with attainments differing very little from the present. 
The advantages of a radical change of this kind are appa- 
rent. It would throw out of our schools about 800 five-year-old 
children, reducing the number of teachers by fifteen or twenty, 
and lessening the annual expenditures from ten to fifteen thou- 
sand dollars. It might also save us, for two or three years at 
least, the construction of additional school buildings or enlarge- 
ments. The plan may not be advisable, but it certainly demands 
discussion. Ultimately nine-year elementary courses will prob- 
ably be found to be the rare exception. 

Kindergartens. At the beginning of the fiscal year a move- 
ment was made in the school board toward the abolition of the 
kindergartens in the interests of retrenchment. This brought to 
the surface a very strong sentiment in favor of kindergartens, and 
called out many protests against any attempt to discontinue or 
restrict them. Not only was this feeling manifested among the 
patrons of existing kindergartens, but among residents of less- 
favored portions of the city, who are hoping that one day circum- 
stances will be such that kindergartens may be established in all 
sections of the city. In deference to this strong public sentiment, 
to say nothing of the conviction of the committee themselves, a 
report was made that it is inexpedient to make any changes in 
this direction. I do not now recall any instances of the abolition 
of kindergartens in any community where they have once been 
established. Wherever introduced, they are patronized and ap- 
preciated, and if retrenchment is necessary the kindergartens 
are the last to feel its effects. They have become an integral 
part of progressive school systems, and the necessity for their 
establishment and maintenance should be recognized as essential 
to any system of schools that lays claim to the highest excellence. 
The four kindergartens in wards one, two, and four have 
been in successful operation all the year. The entire expense for 
instruction incurred is $3,909.49. The enrollment has been 412, 
and the average membership, 195. The cost per pupil is about 
$8.00 more than in a primary school. If by any possibility an 



166 



ANNUAL EEPOETS. 



eight-year elementary course were adopted in the city, as sug- 
gested elsewhere, there would undoubtedly be an emphatic call 
for the extension of the kindergarten to include the entire city 
and to accommodate children five, if not four years of age. If 
this were generally done, the reduction from nine years to eight 
would be merely nominal, and instead of being in the interests of 
economy it would entail a larger annual outlay. The following 
table shows the facts regarding kindergartens in detail : — 



< 




Evening Schools. At least fifty persons having petitioned 
and pledged attendance, in accordance with legal requirements, 
the first evening high school in Somerville was opened in Octo- 
ber, 1904. The academic department of the school continued 
for seventy-nine evenings. The drawing school, which was 
transferred from the Latin building to the English and made a 
department of the school, was in session thirty-nine evenings. 
In all departments, 762 different students were registered. 
While the school was in session four evenings of the week, 
the students were divided into two sets, one attending on Mon- 
day and Thursday, and the other on Tuesday and Friday even- 
ings. Some students attended four evenings. Including all de- 
partments of the school, there were present on the average each 
evening 224. In the academic department the average attend- 
ance dwindled from 291 in October to ninety-two in February, 
and the drawing department from ninety-six in October to sixty- 
two in February. Many registered at the outset who were at- 
tracted by the novelty of an evening high school and were with- 
out any well-considered purpose. They attended but few even- 
ings, but are included in the whole number registered. As far 
as regularity and continuity of attendance are concerned, our 
experience in the evening high school is similar to that in the 
elementary schools. Numbers are comparatively large at the 
opening. They decrease steadily until at the close about a third 
of the original members are in attendance. These short-time at- 
tendants receive practically no benefit from the school, but re- 
quire teachers and swell the expense. The commercial depart- 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. IGT 

ments were much more fully patronized than any others. 
Stenography, bookkeeping, typewriting, penmanship, commer- 
cial arithmetic, English, French, German, Latin, chemistry, 
physics were the subjects pursued. Some of the classes were 
discontinued early in the year, owing to loss of members. The 
organization and management of the school were in the hands 
of the head master of the English school, and his eighteen as- 
sistants were equal in ability to those employed in our day 
schools. Everything possible was done to make the school a 
success, and an opportunity was offered to the young people of 
Somerville which should have been better appreciated. 

The expenses of the school were $0,404 for each pupil for 
each evening; that is, relatively, four times as much as we pay in 
the high school for the same length of time. The equipment of 
the school with books and material required an unusual expendi- 
tuie. The cost of the school is as follows: — 

Paid for instruction " $4,243 

Paid for j anitor service 1,53 

Paid for supplies 1,257 

Paid for light l'046 

Total $6,699 

This year the school opened in October with a much smaller 
registration, but with an average attendance of about 200 each 
evening. The school is being successfully managed and run as 
economically as possible, teachers being dropped as the pupils 
fall out. 

Elementary Evening Schools, The conditions in the ele- 
mentary schools during the season of 1904-1905 were much the 
same as in previous years. The Prescott, Bell, and Forster 
schools were open seventy-nine evenings each, and the Highland, 
sixty-three. The enrollment was considerably smaller, but the 
number in attendance was about the samQ. as last year, 312. 
Thirty-two teachers were employed, and the entire cost of the 
schools was $6,088, an average of $0,247 per pupil per evening, 
which is relatively five times the cost of the elementary day 
schools. 

The statute formerly required that evening schools should 
be kept at least fifty evenings during the year. Recent changes 
in the law, however, make the length of the evening school term 
optional with the committee. For the last few years the schools 
have been open until the first of April. It was thought best, 
however, by the committee this year to close the schools on the 
first of March. The reason for this was purely a financial one, 
the evening school committee being desirous of co-operating 
with the city government in an attempt to reduce expenditures 
in all directions. It is an open question whether attempts to 
economize by shortening the terms of the evening schools are 
wise or not. The students that persist in their attendance belong 



168 ANNUAL EEPOKTS. 

largely to two classes. The smaller class is composed of illit- 
erates, whose attendance is compulsory and who are glad of the 
shortened term. Much the larger class is made up of young men 
and women who appreciate the opportunities the school offers, 
and attend regularly and maintain their zeal and interest and ap- 
plication to the end. These students were much disappointed 
at the early closing of the schools. The loss of the last month 
was a distinct disadvantage to them. Table 15 in the Appendix 
gives the details of evening school expenditures, etc. 

Vacation Schools. The same reason that led to the early 
closing of evening schools actuated the vacation school com- 
mittee in deciding not to open vacation schools during the sum- 
mer. While there are distinct advantages accruing from vacation 
schools, if there must be retrenchment anywhere in the school 
department it may better be made along this line. It is, how- 
ever, very doubtful whether a larger dividend can be secured than 
by spending five or six hundred dollars for the benefit of the class 
of children for whom the vacation schools are designed. 

Cost of the Schools. The total amount spent for the main- 
tenance of the schools of Somerville in 1905 is $321,676. This 
does not include the sums spent on schoolhouse repairs and for 
new buildings. It does cover the amount paid for the care 
of school buildings, for janitors' services, fuel, light, and tele- 
phones. With this expenditure the school board has nothing 
to do, it being wholly in charge of the city government. 

The amount paid for janitors is $21,949.25 

The cost of fuel is 15,166.43 

The cost of Hght is (for nineteen months) 4,344.95 

Telephones 482.26 

A total of $41,942.89 

The cost per capita 3.63 

The second important expenditure is wholly under the con- 
trol of the board, and is covered by what is known as the ''School 
Contingent" appropriation. The following are the chief items : — 

Officers' salaries $4,900.00 

Books $7,088.21 

Stationery 4,385.57 

Laboratory and manual training supplies.. 2,353.08 

Printing 983.47 

Graduation exercises 1,109.59 

Drawing supplies 555.40 

Bookbinding ^'^?HI 

Truant officer's horse . q'oa 

Express and postage "ooo i ? 

Board of truants 322.14 

School census i^qqi 

Telephones H'tl 

Kindergartens ^y.5b 

Miscellaneous i.,6i^.VQ 

Total for school supplies, etc $20,136.82 



SCHOOL DEPAKTMENT. * 161> 



Total outlay on school contingent account $25,036.82 

Appropriation 23,500.00 



Deficiency $1,536.82 

Received for damage to school property $65.84 

Tuition state wards and non-residents 206.16 

272.00 



Net deficiency $1,264.82 

The third, and by far the largest, element of the cost of 
schools is the sum spent for the salaries of teachers. The fol- 
lowing shows the monthly payments : — 

January $26,424.61 

February 25,961.55 

March 24,625.50 

April 24,574.87 

May 24,463.00 

June 24,382.30 

September 24,717.67 

October 26,557.62 

November : 26,643.39 

-December 26,346.61 



Total $254,697.12 

Amount of appropriation 260,000.00 



Balance to the credit of account : $5,302.88 

Deficiency on school contingent account 1,264.82 



Balance (Credit) on school department account. . $4,038.06 

This surplus is largely due to the early closing of the even- 
ing schools, the omission of the vacation schools, the discharge 
of assistants, and the employment of lower-priced teachers. 

The total outlay for all purposes in 1905 is as follows : — 

Teachers' salaries $254,697.12 

Administration 4,900.00 

Care of schoolhouses 41,942.89 

School supplies 20,136.82 

Total for school maintenance $321,676.83 

Paid for repairs 8,305.48 

Paid for new buildings • 51,987.40 

Total for all school purposes $381,969.71 

Each dollar of the sum spent for the support of schools has 
been divided in the following proportion : — 

1901. 

Teachers' salaries $0,790 

Administration : . . . 0.017 

Janitors' salaries 0.071 

Heat and light 0.055 

School supplies 0.067 

Total $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 

Per Capita Cost. The proper way to compare the cost of 
schools one year with another is by considering the amount spent 



1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


$0,800 


$0,781 


$0,793 


$0,792 


0.017 


0.013 


0.016 


0.013 


0.073 


0.070 


0.070 


0.070 


0.042 


0.067 


0.053 


0.061 


0.068 


0.069 


0.068 


0.064 



170 



AXXUAL EEPOETS. 



for each pupil in the average membership. In this computation 
we exchide the cost of evening schools because the sum is now 
so large as to be misleading. It is difficult to include the mem- 
bership of the evening schools with that of the day schools. The 



following shows the 



PER CAPITA COST OF DAY SCHOOLS FOR 1904 AND 1905. 





High Schools. 


Grammar and 
Primary Schools. 


All Day Schools. 




1904 


1905. 


De- 
crease. 


i 1904. 


1905. 


De- 
crease. 


1904. 


1905. 


De- 
crease. 


Instruction . . . 
Supplies .... 
Care 


847 20 
6 04 
4 29 


§45 79 
5 15 
4 15 


§1 41 1 
89 i 

14 : 

1 
1 


$19 24 
; 1 29 
\ 3 31 

1 


§18 86 
1 29 
3 26 


§0 38 
- 00 

05 

1 


§22 16 
1 78 
3 42 


§21 76 
1 70 
3 36 


§0 40 
08 
06 


Total . . . . §57 53 


§55 09 


1 
§2 44 


§23 84 


§23 41 


§0 43 


[ 
§27 36 


§26 82 


§0 54 



If we include the sums paid for the maintenance of evening 
schools, the per capita cost for the two years is as follows : — 

1904. 1905. Change. 

Cost of instruction $23.03 $22.50 —$0.53 

Cost of supplies 1.93 1.74 — 0.19 

Cost of care 3.52 3.63 -h 0.11 

Total $28.48 $27.87 —$0.61 

An examination of these tables shows that in the high 
schools $1.41 less has been paid per pupil for instruction, that 
supplies have cost $0.89 less than last year, and that care of 
buildings has cost $0.14: less. This makes the average cost of 
educating a high school pupil this year $2.44 less than last year, — 
$57.53 in 1904, $55.09 in 1905. This reduction of expense is due 
to the fact that while there has been a large increase in the 
pupilage of the schools, there has been no increase whatever in 
the teaching force. 

Instruction in grammar and primary schools has cost $0.38 
per pupil less this year than last, while supplies have cost exactly 
the same, $1.29 per pupil, and care $0.05 less. This makes the 
net total of the per capita cost of these schools $0.43 less than in 
1904^ — $23.84: m one case, $23.41 in the other. 

Taking all the dav schools together, we find that instruction 
has cost $0.40 less, suppHes $0.08 less, and care $0.06 less, mak- 
ing the net cost per capita $26.82 this year, as compared with 
^27.36 in 1904, a decrease of $0.54. 

Adding the cost of evening schools to that of day schools, 
we increase the cost of instruction $0.74, the cost of supplies 
$0 04, and the cost of care S0.27. This makes the total cost for 
1905 $27.87 per capita, as against $28.48 in 1904, a reduction of 
$0.61, 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 171 

There were fifty-nine cities and towns in the commonwealth 
that paid a larger per capita sum than Somerville in 1901:. The 
^cost of maintaining our schools in 1904 was $5.44 for every thou- 
sand dollars of the city's valuation, but there were 130 cities and 
towns in the state that paid a higher rate. This year the ratio 
for Somerville is the same as for last year. 

It is still to be noted that the school children of Somerville 
increase in number more rapidly than the ability of the city to 
m.eet the expenditure which this education entails. The increase 
m the number of children in the schools in 1905 was 2.8 per cent., 
while the increase in the valuation of the city was only 1.9 per 
-cent. 

While this decrease in the cost of the schools for the year 
may be gratifying and of temporary advantage in relieving the 
financial stress^, we do well to inquire whether there has been in 
any direction a loss of efficiency. There is no question that there 
should be economy in all lines of school expenditure, neither is 
there any question that the people demand that the standard of 
the schools shall be maintained at whatever cost. 

A comparison of the comparative cost of instruction in 
school buildings of different size, estimated on the basis of similar 
grading and equal numbers to a teacher, is interesting. We 
find it to be as follows : — 

Per capita cost of instruction in r2-room buildings $16.29 

in 8-room buildings 15.25 

in 6-room buildings 13.42 

in 4-room buildings 13.47 

It will be seen that the cheapest schools are those that oc- 
cupy six-room buildings. 

The salaries paid to teachers at the present time are as fol- 
lows : — 

2 men $3,000 1 man, 2 women $800 

2 men 2,000 4 women 775 

9 men, 2 women 1,900 16 women 725 

1 man 1,800 6 women 700 

8 men 1,700 201 women 650 

1 man 1,500 6 women 600 

1 man 1,300 1 woman 575 

4 women 1,200 3 women 525 

1 man 1,100 6 women 500 

11 women 1,000 4 women 425 

1 man, 18 women 900 1 woman 350 

2 women 850 1 woman 275 

On this basis, the total salary hst at present is $247,825. 

, Stamp Savings System. The stamp savings system intro- 
duced three years ago has begun its fourth year under the same 
general plan and management. The novelty has worn away, and 
the sale of stamps has reached a business basis. It requires time 
and service on the part of teachers, both of which in most cases 
are cheerfully given. 



1*^^ ANNUAL EEPOETS. 

The amount of business transacted is as follows : — 

1903. 1904. 1905. 

Received from sale of stamps $15435.59 $9,069.80 $8,056.80 

Deposited in Somerville Savings 

Bank 8,069.85 5,514.89 4,754.46 

Value of cards cashed 3,152.46 2,521.86 3,116.47 

Total collections for three years to December 1, 1905. .$34,607.67 

Total amount deposited in bank 19,509.46 

Total value of cards cashed , 9,318.66 

Losses in three years (made good by interest) 136.26 

fledical Inspection. The subject of the regular medical 

inspection of schools has been discussed in my reports for sev- 
eral years. Two or three votes of the school board are on record 
showing their approval of the installment of the system in Som- 
erville. Early this year a special committee was appointed to 
confer with the members of the board of health with reference 
to the matter. There was hearty agreement as to the wisdom 
and utility of the plan. Definite action was taken by the board 
of health, and the failure to secure the appropriation asked for 
was the only reason why the plan was not set in motion. Let 
us hope that money will be available during the coming year. 
There has been a minimum of infectious disease during 1905, the 
schools being very slightly affected. The preparation and cir- 
culation among teachers and parents by the board of health of 
a pamphlet containing directions for the prevention, treatment, 
and care of all the ordinary contagious diseases has been found 
very helpful. Teachers are watchful for any indications of 
trouble, schoolrooms are promptly and thoroughly fumigated 
whenever it is necessary, and books and other school property 
used by children affected are destroyed. 

Public Library. There is one respect in which Somerville 
stands pre-eminent among the cities of the commonwealth, if 
not of the country. It is in the close and cordial union between 
the public schools and the public library. Not only are the 
library doors swung wide open to teachers, and to pupils of all 
ages, but the books themselves are transferred from the library 
to the schoolrooms. There are at the present time 152 libraries 
containing nearly 6,000 volumes in the schools. These books 
have been selected mainly by the teachers themselves, and are, 
therefore, especially adapted to the age and attainment of the 
children in whose hands they are placed. The records show that 
there have been circulated among the school children during the 
year a total of 90,000 books lacking two. The advantages ac- 
cruing in this way to children cannot well be estimated, and an 
influence must go out from this distribution of books that will 
be lifelong. The school authorities recognize with gratitude the 
liberality of the library trustees and the unfailing courtesy and 
labor of Librarian Foss and his efficient assistant. Miss Wood- 
man, in purchasing and distributing books so generously among^ 
school children. 



SCHOOL DEPAETMENT. 173 

Since the opening of tlie school year another departure has 
been made by the hbrary management, greatly to the advantage 
of the schools. It is the distribution in rotation among the 
schools of stereoptic pictures, the best that photographic art can 
produce. These pictures are used in the study of geography and 
history. They vividly show natural scenery, principal cities, life 
and customs of people, and notable buildings and works of art in 
all parts of the world. They -are a great aid in instruction in the 
branches they illustrate, and are used with much zest by both 
pupils and teachers. 

Manual Training. There are still some people in the com- 
munity who live too much in the past, and who feel and declare 
that manual training has no place in the public schools. They 
are generally people with narrow views who are totallv igno- 
rant of what is going on in the educational world. Manual 
training has become a fixed element in the modern school. 
Manual training schools are found in every country that lays 
claim to an educational system. The value of this training is 
undeniable. The law requires it to be given in both high and 
elementary schools. The subject has a place in our high school 
under unfortunate limitations, which should be removed by the 
extension of the course in rooms especially adapted to the pur- 
pose. It should be given in the form of wood work for boys and 
domestic science for girls in the elementary schools also. At 
least two centres should be fitted up for these purposes, suitably 
equipped, provided with competent teachers, and opened to the 
pupils of the eighth and ninth grades. The school committee 
has several times voted to make this a feature of our educational 
system, and requests have been made for accommodations. The 
necessities of the case, however, have not appealed to those who 
control the necessary funds for this purpose. To show the 
strength of public sentiment along this line, I quote what has just 
been said by a student of educational problems in one of the lead- 
ing periodicals : — 

The popular distinction between industrial education and higher edu- 
cation has no real existence. There is no higher education than that 
furnished by the professional schools — law, medical, theological. But 
training for law, medicine, and the ministry is industrial education as 
truly as training for carpentering, blacksmithing, or farming. The first 
three are industries no less than the second three. 

And carpentering, blacksmithing, and farming are just as "high" as 
law, medicine, or the ministry. It is as important to live under a good 
roof as to live under good laws. Good bread is as important as good 
theology; bad cooking is as provocative of wickedness as bad preaching. 
Life is for service; education is for life. That is the best education 
which best fits the pupil for the best service he can render. Which is 
better— to be a blacksmith or a preacher? That depends; it is better 
to pound an anvil and make a good horseshoe than to pound a pulpit 
and make a poor sermon. , . r ir . j 

There is a real distinction between education for self-support and 
education for self-development; between culture and what the Germans 
call the bread-and-butter sciences. In order, if not m importance, the 
bread-and-butter sciences come first. The first duty every man pwes to 



174 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



society is to support himself; therefore the first office of education is to- 
enable the pupil to support himself. eaucation is to- 

nn..2"\"'''""^^^'"^'T^ '' not merely industrial training. It is not 
merely training for self-support; it is also training for self-?ulture The 
i?H has other uses than to hold a book; the eye other uses than to^ 
read a printed page. Education is the training of the whole man-body, 
soul and spirit. To teach a boy the mechanics of home-keeping, to- 
teach a girl the chemistry of home-keeping, is as much self-culture as to 
teach either what kind of homes the ancient Greeks and Romans pos- 
sessed. Our present self-development is too narrow. We need ta 
broaden it. Manual training is necessary to make the "all-round" man 

Manual training is moral training. The boy will learn that he is- 
under law more quickly in a workshop than in a schoolroom. In- 
dustry, order, carefulness, accuracy, obedience, conscientiousness are 
taught at the forge and the work-bench more easily than at the desk. 
Moral lessons are better taught by doing than by reading, by tools 
than by text-books. 

Whether manual training can come into our schools without puttings 
something out is a question. What, if anything, shall be put out is 
another question. But it ought to come in for three reasons: — 

To equip for self-support. 

To make all-round men and women. 

To develop the moral nature. 

Promotions. There are some among us even now who think 
"the former days better than these," and who point with pride to 
the old-fashioned "district school," claiming its superiority in 
comparison with modern schools. Their judgment ftiay be ob- 
scured by the glamour of some bright country boy who has come 
to the city and made a phenomenal business success. The aver- 
age mediocrity of the whole number and the restricted curriculum 
and narrow opportunities are forgotten. There was an excel- 
lency, however, in the country school which must be conceded. 
There was generally no attempt at classification, and the elective 
system prevailed. Each selected his favorite studies and worked 
upon them independently of his fellows. Progress along the 
chosen lines was rapid. A spirit of self-reliance was developed. 
The bright were not retarded by the slow, nor were the latter 
forced beyond their ability. 

The most common and probably the best founded criticism- 
of graded schools relates to their ''deadly uniformity." "Fifty 
pupils are in lock step, and the rate of advance is determined by 
the capacity of the average third. The bright pupils who might 
do double the w^ork are repressed, while those whom nature has- 
not so highly favored are either forced beyond their natural ca- 
pacity or left at the end of the year hopelessly behind." The in- 
dividual is lost in the mass. 

This danger has been generally recognized, and many at- 
tempts have been made to remedy the evil, with varying degrees 
of success. Some cities have adopted a plan of promotions at 
shorter intervals than a year, ranging from five months to six 
weeks. Others form "skipping classes," in which four years' 
work may be done in three, or three years' work in two. Still 
other plans have been tried. The latest, and one which readily 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 175 

adapts itself to most schools without necessarily increasing the 
expense, is the one which has recently been systematically applied 
in the city of Batavia, N. Y. While containing nothing abso- 
lutely new, the advantages of the plan lie in its methodical ap- 
plication and persistent working. The prominent feature is that 
a certain portion of the class instruction and recitation is replaced 
by the direct teaching of the individual pupil. A certain portion 
of each day is set apart for this line of work. The class in gen- 
eral is employed in study or written exercise while the teacher 
gives to the pupil seated at her side the special help and direction 
that he needs. Each child knows that his advancement depends 
wholly upon his own effort. No attempt is made to keep all 
pupils absolutely together in any subject. The precocious, the 
mediocre, the slow may each progress to the top of his bent. 
Those in special need of encouragement and instruction in one 
or two subjects (very few pupils are behind in all subjects) receive 
just what they require. Class instruction and recitation have 
their place, but they are subordinated to the requirements of the- 
individual. A healthy spirit of emulation is aroused, and each 
one realizes that rewards are based solely upon individual merit. 

The most successful working of this plan entails the employ- 
ment of an extra teacher in each building, — not an apprentice or 
a journeyman, but a patient, sympathetic, skilful, versatile 
woman, who passes from room to room and gives encouragement 
and assistance where most needed. In classes of twenty-five or 
thirty, or even thirty-five, — numbers that approach more nearly 
to the ideal, — the regular teacher does her work without 
assistance. 

The result of the plan is that those that are capable advance 
from grade to grade at an}^ time during the year, according to 
their attainments. Just the encouragement and help are given 
that the lower third of the class need. At the end of the year no 
one is left behind to repeat the work, except in very rare instances 
where long-continued absence or other unavoidable circum- 
stances have interfered. This plan is being tried in several New 
England cities, and thus far with promise of success. Longer 
experience, of course, will demonstrate its actual value. 

It is apparent that in our own schools there is need of some- 
thing of this sort, some well-considered and effective plan to se- 
cure the promotion of pupils whenever they are ready for it, and 
to prevent the spiritless repetition of a whole }' ear's work. 

In our schools 1,200 pupils fail annually of promotion to the 
next grade. This number includes those who drop back after a 
three months' trial in the advanced work. Distributed among 
200 or more classes, it gives only four, five, or six to a class, but 
in the aggregate the number seems large. If all these pupils re- 
mained in school for the extra year, the cost to the city for their 
instruction would be $30,000. Not all, however, remain. Many 
drop out of school disheartened. If any plan can be devised to- 



176 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



save this extra year to the pupil and to the school, it would be 
not only of immense advantage to the individual, but a worthy 
saving to the city. 

The Batavian plan has been presented to our teachers, and 
in general meets with hearty approval. Some of them are using 
it to advantage. One great obstacle in the way of its success, 
however, is the size of the classes in our schools. For one woman 
to teach a class of forty-eight pupils successfully by any known 
plan is well-nigh impossible. The necessity for massing pupils 
in instruction and recitation is apparent. Some individual in- 
struction may be given, but it is perforce very limited in amount, 
at the best. 

There is general recognition among educators of the neces- 
sity for smaller classes, and efforts in that direction are being made 
wherever possible. Smaller classes being at present impossible 
with us, the only remedy lies in the employment of an extra 
teacher in every large building, who shall devote her entire time 
to work among the backward or those in especial need. If the 
employment of such extra help should result in the promotion of 
even two-thirds of those who would otherwise be forced to repeat 
the work, the extra expenditure involved would be largely jus- 
tified. 

Some such scheme should be adopted not only in the ele- 
mentary, but in the high schools. Many pupils drop out of the 
high schools early in the course through sheer discouragement. 
They are thrown more upon their own resources in the high 
school. The habit of self-reliant, individual work has not been 
formed. They have depended heretofore too much upon the 
teacher, and, after vain attempts to maintain a creditable stand- 
ing, they drop out of school. Moreover, many pupils are condi- 
tioned in one or more studies, largely, no doubt, on account of 
their own indifference, but in many cases because it has been im- 
possible to give them the requisite help at just the right time. A 
skilled teacher could occupy her time to great advantage among 
this class of pupils. I commend the general adoption of this plan 
and the employment of extra teachers as far as possible to the 
careful consideration of your honorable body. 

Student Organizations in High Scliools. The question of the 
control of student organizations in high schools is now promi- 
nently before the educational public, and is occasioning earnest 
discussion in all parts of the country. There are two forms of 
these organizations, widely different in character and in useful- 
ness. Organizations of the first kind are open and public in their 
character. They include all forms of athletic clubs, — baseball, 
football, basket ball, polo, track athletics of all kinds, etc. ; liter- 
ary organizations, student pubHcations, dramatic clubs, glee 
clubs, school orchestras, chess and checker clubs, and organiza- 
tions of a similar character. The object of these societies is in 
general worthy, and, if well ordered and controlled, they may be 



SCHOOL DEPAKTMENT. 177 

useful in promoting either the physical or mental or social in- 
terests of students. They generally bear the school name. If 
mismanaged or uncontrolled, if excesses are allowed, if actions 
are permitted that are prejudicial to either the good name of the 
school or of its students, they become a menace, if not a positive 
injury. 

Thus far Somerville high schools have been remarkably 
free from any of the objectionable features that have been noted 
elsewhere. It will be remembered that the subject of school 
athletics was discussed at some length in last year's report. Con- 
ditions have not materially changed since then. The Somerville 
High School Athletic Association is wisely managing the athletic 
interests of the schools. The employment of a graduate coach 
of sterling character, interested equally in the success of the 
teams and in the maintenance of the good name of the school 
and its students, has kept athletics of all forms on a high plane, 
and no criticism can be justly made. The fact that teachers of 
the school are on the board of government and that the finances 
are managed by one of them has maintained a healthy restraint, 
and has directed rather than antagonized the student manage- 
ment. The only criticism that may be made in connection with 
other open organizations connected with the schools may be 
along financial lines. As a rule, high school boys and girls are 
without the experience that is necessary to the transaction of 
business involving the outlays of large sums of money. A debit 
balance at the end of the year against any organization bearing 
the school name is a discredit, and there should be such control 
of funds by one or more members of the faculty of the school as 
would avoid endangering in any way its reputation. Just how^ 
far school authorities may interfere in the management of stu- 
dent organizations is a mooted question. An effort was made 
last year to secure legislation that would remove all doubts in the 
matter. The effort failed, but the attempt will be renewed this 
year in the hope of success. There is much greater need 
of authoritative control in other cities of the state than in our 
own, but the future is long, and ''forewarned is forearmed." 

The second form of student organizations is that of secret 
societies, — fraternities and sororities. These societies have de- 
veloped very rapidly all over the country during the last few 
years, and are in imitation of college customs. Most of them 
are local in character, although there are a few that have a na- 
tional organization. There are six or eight of these organiza- 
tions in our own high schools, and while there has been no con- 
flict between school authorities and these organizations (save in 
a single instance), they are in influence and character unsalutary, 
and they may become pernicious as the years go on. 

The subject has assumed such importance as to have en- 
grossed, during the year, the attention of the Massachusetts 
•Council' of Education, an organization composed of leading edu- 



178 ■ ANNUAL REPORTS. 

cational experts of the state. A very thorough and exhaustive- 
investigation of the whole question, not only as it pertains to 
New England, but to the entire country, has been conducted 
during the year by Mr. Whitcomb, principal of the English higb 
school, on behalf of this body. The consensus of opinion as ex- 
pressed by high school principals the country over is very em- 
phatically against these organizations as a whole. The general 
sentiment is that they should be abolished. If permitted at all, 
they should be under the control of the school authorities, but 
this removes the element of secrecy which seems to be their 
corner-stone. The subject was fully discussed at the last meet- 
ing of the N. E. A., and the following resolution, summarizing 
the objections to these organizations which have been disclosed' 
by experience in various schools, was presented : — 

"Whereas, the sentiment of superintendents, principals, and teachers 
against secret fraternities is almost universal, and their testimony, as 
disclosed in tlie foregoing report, coincides with the observation and ex- 
perience of the members of the committee individually; be it therefore 

''Resolved, that we condemn these secret organizations, because 
they are subversive of the principles of democracy which should prevail 
in the public schools; because they are selfish, and tend to narrow the 
minds and sympathies of the pupils; because they stir up strife and con- 
tention; because they are snobbish; because they dissipate energy and 
proper ambition; because they set wrong standards; because rewards 
are not based on merit, but on fraternity vows; because secondary 
school boys are too young for club life; because they are expensive and 
foster habits of extravagance; because they bring politics into the 
legitimate organizations of the school; because they detract mterest 
from study; and because all legitimate elements for good— social, moral, 
and intellectual— w^hich these societies claim to possess can be better 
supplied to the pupils through the school at large in the form of literary 
societies and clubs under the sanction and supervision of the faculties 
of the schools." 

Attention is called to the subject in this report so that not 
only the school board, but the public may be duly informed.. 
The matter is one in which the parents of high school pupils are 
vitally interested, and their influence, if wisely directed, would 
be decisive in the settlement of any vexed questions that might 
come up Of course there is no desire anywhere to interfere 
with the legitimate social life of students. It should be remem- 
bered however, that schools are maintained for a distinctively 
educational purpose, and whatever interferes in any way with 
the accompHshment of this purpose, broadly interpreted, should 
be kept separate and- distinct from them. 

Sanitary Condition of Schoolhouses. Public attention has 
been recently drawn in an unusual wav to the condition oi certain 
Somerville schoolhouses. This fact gives special pertinency to^ 
a brief, general consideration of the subject, and makes sugges- 
tions timely. . i . i .-u ^ ..t. 

At the outset it should be distinctly understood that the 
school committee has no authority whatever concerning the lo- 
cation, construction, control, or care of schoolhouses. Ihe 
statutes give them full control of the schools. The only allusion 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. ITfi' 

to school buildings found anywhere is in chapter 13 of the Re- 
vised Ordinances of the city, which provides that the school 
committee shall annually, if possible in the month of January,, 
present to the board of aldermen a statement of such additional 
school accommodations as in its judgment may be required. 
The decision with regard to location and construction of build- 
ings, the employment of janitors, all provision for light, heat, fur- 
niture, repairs, etc., are placed in the hands of the commissioner 
of pubHc buildings. As far as the exercise of any authority 
goes, schoolhouses are as independent of the school committee 
as are the buildings occupied by the fire department. If, ther'e- 
fore, there are defects or lack of whatever is healthful, necessary, 
or suitable, the responsibility rests in no wise upon any of the 
school authorities. It should be said, however, that this does 
not necessarily imply any lack or unwillingness on the part of 
any department of the city government to supply what is needed 
within the appropriations. The trouble is that money is lacking 
to do certain things in connection with school buildings that 
every one recognizes ought to be done. This has been especially 
true during the year now closing. Beyond what was necessary 
for fixed charges, the commissioner has had this year only the 
meagre sum of $7,000 to provide all the repairs that have been 
necessary for twenty-six school buildings. A supplementary ap- 
propriation of $1,300 was made during the summer for the 
specific purpose of purchasing furniture made necessary by 
changes in classes. For the seven years antecedent to 1905, the- 
average expenditure for schoolhouse repairs was more than- 
twice as much, or $15,470. It will be seen that, as far as the ex- 
penditure for repairs is concerned, this year has been a marked 
exception, owing, no doubt, to financial stringency in all depart- 
ments of the city government. Here is a million and a third in- 
vested in our educational plant. Certainly any other lot of real 
estate of this character w^ould require an annual expenditure of 
say two per cent, to keep it in the best condition. 

There is published in the present edition of the Rules and 
Regulations of the School Board a set of rules for the government 
of schoolhouse janitors. These rules, however, are now null and 
void. General directions have been issued by the commissioner 
to janitors that they are to keep the schoolhouses clean, warm, 
and in a perfectly sanitary condition, at whatever outlay of time 
and labor may be necessary. Janitors are required to honor all 
reasonable requests of principals, and are expected to be cour- 
teous, accommodating, and helpful. I wish to say regarding the 
present corps of school janitors that they fill the positions they 
hold to the general satisfaction of teachers and superintendent. 
Of course, the}^ dififer greatly from one another in their standards^ 
and in what I say I intend no criticism of any individual among 
them. Section 68 of the Rules of the School Board, under the 
head of "Duties of Principals," reads as follows : — 



180 AXXUAL EEPOETS. 

Section 68, They shall exercise a vigilant supervision over 
their respective buildings and grounds, and see that they are; 
kept in a neat and wholesome condition. Any continued neglect 
of duty on the part of janitors they are to report to the commisT 
sioner of public buildings. Defects in the heating or sanitary 
arrangements of the building and needful repairs are ^to be re- 
ported to the superintendent of schools. ,' V'- , , . 

Any communications between principals and the commis- 
sioner of public buildings now pass through the hands of the 
superintendent. Calls, for what is necessary are made on blanks 
provided for the purpose, and are approved by the superin- 
tendent. The relations between principals and janitors are, I 
think, on the whole pleasant. It is disagreeable for any principal 
to report a janitor for neglect of duty, and it is quite probable 
that a principal would suffer minor neglects to go on for some 
time rather than to bring about the disagreeable relations that 
would naturally result from such reporting. 

What is the present condition of our school buildings (1) 
OS to sanitation! I do not think that there are any conditions at 
the present time that affer a menace to the health of school chil- 
dren. There are certain repairs and improvements, however, 
that should be made in order to ensure absolute safety. These 
are chiefly found in the older buildings. At the Davis, Cum- 
mings, and Bingham schools the present old-fashioned and un- 
suitable toilet arrangements should be removed and modern ap- 
pliances furnished. There are minor repairs and changes to be 
made in several other buildings. Everywhere there should be 
the closest inspection and flushing of the apparatus two or three, 
times a day. It is only by constant care and vigilance, by the 
generous use of water, scrubbing brush, and broom, that the de- 
sired results can be secured. 

(2) As to Cleanliness. In this respect there are varymg 
standards among the schools. There are some buildings to 
which the most punctilious housewife could take no exceptions. 
There are others that fall considerably short of the ideal. There 
is no reason why a school building should not be kept as clean 
as a hospital. This involves, however, a great deal more work 
than it is customary to put into schoolhouse cleaning. All 
schoolrooms should be scrubbed more frequently, walls should be 
dusted, windows cleaned, and many of the rooms should be 
swept daily. If our schoolyards were concreted, and if sidewalks 
were provided, there would be less necessity for broom and brush 
The janitor's standard of cleanliness and that of the prmcipal 
often differ, and it is a mooted question whether the one or the 
other should control the situation. 

(3) As to Temperature and Ventilation. All our schoolhouses 
are provided with adequate means of ventilation. The difficulty 
lies in the management of the apparatus. If mismanaged or neg- 
lected foul air necessarily results. The heating facilities m all 



SCHOOL DEPAKTMENT. 



18\ 



the buildings but twO; — the Pope and the Highland— are fully 
adequate. In the buildings named the corridors are not heated. 
I have known the temperature m the Highland corridor tp be 
below forty when tjie rooms were sixty-eight, This difference 
in temperature jeopards the health of teacher and pupil, and a 
remedy should be applied. Both of these buildings are furnace- 
heated. The plan is at some tirne to replace the existing appa- 
ratus by steam heat. This means an outlay of $5,000. While, 
as has been remarked elsew^here, w^e are frequently obliged to 
dismiss classes on account of cold rooms, the cause does not lie 
in the heating plant. Children and teachers sufTer more from 
over-heated rooms than cold rooms. In theory we maintain an 
equable temperature of sixty-eight at the level of children's desks.- 
As a matter of fact, the temperature often rises far above a 
healthful point. The absorption of the teacher in her work or 
her inability to- regulate the matter is accountable for the trouble.' 
In my opinion, the teacher should have nothing whatever to do 
with the temperature or ventilation of her room. This matter 
should be in the hands of the janitor, and he should be held re- 
sponsible for maintaining an even temperature during the entire 
school day. He should visit the rooms as often as necessary, and 
be held to a strict accountability. If any obstacle prevents main- 
taining the right temperature in every room of the buildings 
whether located on the north side or the south,, that obstacle 
should be removed. fnoi,! 

'', .(4) 45 to Light. Three buildings, — the "Prescott, Forster, 
and Bell, — and some rooms in the Morse are very inadequately 
lighted. Attention has been repeatedly called to this serious, 
defect without avail. The light surface should be a fifth of the 
floor surface in every room. In these buildings it is a half of 
what it should be. Additional windows are needed in every 
room. Several years ago this defect was remedied by the addi-' 
tion of two windows in some rooms ih the Forster school. The 
effect of inadequate light may not be at once apparent, but it is 
certainly one, cause of the constantly-increasing defect in vision 
noticeable in school children. ^^''"^ ^^"-"'■"' 

. (5) As to Seats. Modern school furniture is adjustable to 
the size of children. Manv of our schoolrooms', however, are, 
furnished ^-ith old-fashioned desks and chairs. From year tO: 
year different grades occupy the. same room. Not only comfort, 
but health is involved in a seat adapted to the size of the child. 
Many children dangle their feet in the air without touching the 
floor' for five hours. a day. This is pernicious, and' it should be 
made impossible. Several of our rooms are re-furnished with 
adjustable chairs and desks every year, but the change is not 
made as rapidly as is desirable. The expenditure of a thousand, 
dollars would remedy this serious trouble. 

-, (6) As- to Walls. The walls and ceiHngs in the Prescott, 
knapp, Edgerly, Carr, Morse, Highland, and Hodgkms are 



18!^ ANNUAL EEPORTS. 

grimy and stained with dust and discolored. They need whiten- 
ing and tinting for sanitary as well as aesthetic reasons. 

I am aware that to secure all these things that I have men- 
tioned in some detail requires a considerable expenditure of 
money, but every suggestion made is in the interest of health, or 
comfort, or education, and if we are to make our school buildings 
what they should be and what I think the general public senti- 
ment demands that they ought to be, we must be ready to make 
expenditures therefor. 

Schoolhouse Decorations. It is expected that schoolnouses 
will be made pleasant, healthful, and comfortable at public ex- 
pense. It is not too much to ask that the walls of schoolrooms 
shall be tinted and kept free from dust. We do not expect, how- 
ever, that schoolrooms shall be beautified at the city's expense. 
Some public-spirited citizens, who believe in the refining and 
elevating influence of works of art in the schoolroom, have con- 
tributed during the year gifts, either of money or pictures, to 
various schools. Teachers, who know better than any one else 
the silent influence of attractive schoolrooms, are always ready 
to lend their efforts in this direction. Children, also, are learn- 
ing the difference between the bare or tawdry and the artistic, 
and are alwavs ready to contribute their mites and lend their aid 
in the adornment of their schoolrooms. The result is that many 
of our school buildings are getting to be not only attractive, but 
a means of education along art lines. During 1905 there has 
been raised by the combined efforts of citizens, teachers, and 
pupils the sum of $2,800, which has been or is to be expended in 
the purchase of pictures, statuary, pianos, etc. The following 
statement gives the facts somewhat in detail : — 

The Latin school has received a gift from S. Newton Cutler, 
former chairman of the school board, of Garnet-Gosse's 'Illus- 
trated History of English Literature," in four volumes. It has 
also received statuary worth $20 as a result of the competitive 
art contest of the Boston Herald. 

The English school has received a similar valuable set of 
books from Mr. Cutler, statuary from the Herald contest, and 
pictures given by the graduating class, to the value of $250 in 

the aggregate. , m i - ^ u r.f 

The Hanscom teachers and pupils have raised by means ot 

an entertainment $66, with which a piano for the hall was pur- 

chased 

The teachers, pupils, and parents of the Knapp school dis- 
trict have recently held an art exhibition and bazaar, which re- 
sulted in the raising of $725. Class gifts have also been received 
to the value of $15, making the entire sum $740. 

The Edgerly school, by the sale of newspaper coupons in 
various contests, has $113 to expend for schoolhouse decorations 

The Glines school has received from a friend the sum of 
$100 for works of art, and pictures from graduating classes and 
friends of the kindergarten to the amount of $34. 



SCHOOL DEPAETMENT. 183 

The Forster school, by the sale of coupons and by enter- 
tainments of one sort or another, has collected $625, with $578 
of which a grand piano has been purchased for the main building, 
and another for the annex. The rest is to be devoted to school- 
room decoration. 

The Bingham school, by the sale of coupons, has raised for 
statuary the sum of $52. The school has also received from the 
Woman's Relief Corps the gift of four flags for schoolrooms. . 

The Carr school, by the sale of coupons, has been enabled 
to purchase a grand piano valued at $230. 

The teachers and pupils of the Durell school have raised $24 
for pictures, and have received a gift of $30 worth from the Som- 
•erville Woman's Club. This same generous club has provided 
the Cummings school with pictures valued at $15. 

The Proctor school acknowledges the gift from the Woman's 
Relief Corps of eight schoolroom flags, and, also the present of a 
valuable picture from Miss M. A. Tufts. 

By the sale of coupons, the Hodgkins school pupils netted 
$238, which has been expended for pictures and statuary. 

The Brown school, by candy sales and the Turner Art Ex- 
hibit, has raised $142 for schoolroom pictures. 

The Lowe School, through a Turner Art Exhibit, re- 
ceived $89. 

As a rule, this sum of money has come in small contributions 
from pupils and parents and friends of the school, without being 
burdensome to any one. Of course, there are objectionable 
methods that may be used to raise money for such purposes, but 
in rea?ona1)le ways the public are always ready to contribute 
towards an object they believe to be so worthy. 

The thanks of the schools and of the school authoritiesare 
here extended to all individuals and organizations that have aided 
in this good work. 

Exposition Awards. At the St. Louis Exposition Somerville 
received a diploma and a gold medal for its secondary school 
exhibit prepared by the English high school. It also received 
a diploma and a gold medal for the exhibit sent from its ele- 
mentary schools. A diploma cind a gold medal were also 
awarded to Head Master Whitcomb for work as collaborator. 

At the Lewis and Clark Exposition, to which the entire 
Somerville exhibit was sent from St. Louis, the city was awarded 
a gold medal for ^'Secondary Education." These exhibits have 
been returned to us, and will be shown to the public next month. 

Fire Drill. An iron tubular fire escape through which pupils 
slide on a spiral has just been completed for the Bell school. 
The time of descent from the top is twelve seconds. By its use 
the building can be emptied in twelve minutes. 

Regular fire drills are practiced in every school building. 
Each teacher and child knows his place and exactly what to do. 



184 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

When the signal of four quick strokes is sounded on the gongs^ 
boys assigned to the duty throw and fasten open the doors, and 
without undue haste or excitement the children march out, gen- 
erally carrying their clothing with them. Experiments made 
within a week show that every school building in the city may be 
emptied in two minutes, and many in a shorter time. -Of course, 
the three-storied buildings require the longer time, and a build- 
ing with three or four exits can be emptied very quickly. At 
the end of three or four, or, at the outside, five minutes, all pupils 
are re-seated and at work. This drill ensures absolute safety in 
the event of alarm or emergency, . and is conducted in such a 
manner as to allay panic, the children often marching out to 
music in the usual way. 

A Valedictory. At the end of the year 1905, Quincy E. 
Dickerman, a valued member of the board, closed a service in 
the interests of the schools extending over the unusual period of 
twenty-six years. At the final meeting of the year, in responding 
to appreciative resolutions adopted by the board, he presented 
the following recommendations, the outgrowth of long experi- 
ence in public school work. At my request, the board voted to 
incorporate them in the annual report. They are as follows : — 

I trust I shall be excused if I make a few suggestions for the future. 
I had hoped to see manual training introduced into the elementary 
schools before my retirement. This department of instruction has been 
a great success in the high school. It is required by the Public Statutes 
in cities of 20,000 inhabitants. I have more than once introduced an 
order, which was adopted by the board, recommending the introduction 
of manual training in the grammar schools, but as the city government 
did not furnish the means, the board is not responsible for the failure. 
I hope in the near future that cooking, also, may be introduced into the 
upper grades of the grammar schools. 

I think it is desirable that a more complete commercial course 
should be arranged for the English high school, to the end that pupils 
may not be obliged to remain in the school two years before they can 
take up stenography and typewriting, which have come to be nearly as 
important as bookkeeping, and almost a commercial industry. 

The subject of athletics in the high schools should receive attention. 
I do not like the term, for it is now commonly appHed to football, base- 
ball, and basket ball. These are all very well in their place, but I draw 
the line on football as it is now played, and I do not like the idea of our 
young ladies going to neighboring cities for match games of basket ball. 
We need in our high school some systematic training in gymnastics m a 
well-equipped gymnasium, with a competent instructor, where all the 
pupils, girls as well as bovs, may have the advantage of physical culture, 
and their needs and defects be pointed out and remedied by proper 

exercises. 

I think more attention should be given to voice culture, especially 
the speaking voice, to rhetorical reading and declamation, and to prac- 
tice and contests in debating clubs. In this age of speech-making it is 
quite desirable that our boys and girls should have training m this 

direction. . . r i i. i j „.^ 

I hope that svstematic medical inspection of the schools and an 
assistant for the superintendent, as already suggested, will soon be real- 
ized The beginning of the school year, in my judgment should not be 
earlier than the second Monday in September, making that the starting 
point, and arranging the vacations as may be thought expedient. 



SCHOOL DEPAKTMENT. 185' 

It is to the teachers that we are mainly to look for advancement 
along the lines of moral, physical, and intellectual improvement. The^ 
are brought into close contact with the minds and hearts of the pupils;, 
they are the motive power which largely influences, inspires, and de-- 
velops noble traits of character. From them our children receive valu- 
able suggestions concerning physical culture and the suppression of the 
smoking habit and similar vices. Be vigilant, then, as ever, in securing 
the best teaching force, making the salaries such as will command and 
retain the best talent, remembering that, as a rule, high salaries will 
increase the standard of efficiency. 

I shall continue to take an interest in our schools and the results 
of the dehberations of the board. The education and training of our 
children mean so much to us, to our homes, to our happiness, to the 
future welfare and prosperity of our city, to good citizenship, to tem- 
perance, to good government, to all that makes life enjoyable in our 
beloved city, that I am sure that the interests of the schools will be 
safely fostered by you, and that the large appropriations for them will be 
so used as to yield an income of which no one will have reason to comr 
plain. .! 

The Essentials. During the year our schools have con-' 
tinned to move steadily and without serious interruption along 
the usual conservative lines. Supervisors and teachers have 
v^orked intelligently and faithfully. There has been that hearty 
co-operation between the school and the home without which 
the best results are impossible. This spirit has been developed 
and fostered by mothers' meetings held in several of the schools. 
These are of great advantage, and bring mothers and teachers 
into association, acquaintance, and harmony, and they lead to 
mutual helpfulness in the work in which both are engaged. 

While Somerville has a reputation for good schools, it has 
also a reputation for being a conservative school city. In some 
respects, perhaps, we are too conservative. We have, however, 
tried to maintain high standards along what some would call 
"a. straight and narrow way.^' Every community has its dis- 
tinctive needs, and we have sought in our schools to supply ours, 
leaving the task of experimenting to others. If our schools have 
merit, it is chiefly to be attributed to a strict adherence to the 
principle that the spring and source of all excellence in them 
rests in the character of the teacher. Buildings and books, 
studies and supervision, are all subordinate to this prime factor, 
From the lime when we cease to secure the best possible teachers 
or yield to the pressure to employ the weak or mediocre to please 
their friends, or for other reasons, our schools will begin to det 
teriorate. 

We hear periodically a clamor that the schools shall teach 
only the essentials. But who shall' tell what the essentials of 
education are? The question has puzzled the philosophers of 
all' the ages. All admit that the schools should give some degree 
of intelligence and skill. It is essential that life be self-supportT 
ing and productive, but it is more essential that life be pure, and 
useful, and happy. "Life is more than meat, and the body than 
raiment." The schools should equip for the struggle for physical 



186 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



existence that lies before every one, but they should also equip 
with that inner furnishing that brings joy into life, independently 
Ox extraneous circumstances. They should give a full equipment 
for the far more important struggle to maintain personal purity 
and honor that awaits all. They should equip not for self- 
aggrandizement, but for service to one's fellows, to the state, to 
the country. What is love of knowledge compared with love of 
truth? What avails intellectual training if the will is left too 
weak to resist evil tendencies and influences?^ Of what value is 
wealth without honor, or power without purity, or success 
achieved at the sacrifice of integrity? 

During the past year the moral sense of the nation has been 
shocked at the revelation of the abuse of powder and opportu- 
nities for selfish and illegitimate ends. The outrages done to the 
love of justice and fair play and the ''square deal" that always in- 
lieres in the people have awakened them, and the demand for re- 
form, for honesty and incorruptibility in positions of public trust 
and power is heard on every hand. 

Herein lies an opportunity for the public schools, the chief 
agency for establishing and raising moral standards. This is not 
to be done by preaching or moralizing over evil conditions, not 
by teaching dogmatic religion of any kind. It is to be done by 
eliminating false standards ; by honoring endeavor rather than 
success ; by constantly holding up ideals ; by the general trend 
of school discipline; by insistence on obedience to parents, to 
teachers, to law by whomever made ; by cultivating a respect 
for authority and for those who wield it ; by teaching fidelity to 
trusts ; by insisting that government is to be administered for the 
highest good of the people ; and by planting deep the principle 
that public ofifice is a public trust, never to be used for the pro- 
motion of personal interests of any kind. Children never learn 
to love truth and justice and right in the abstract. These virtues 
must be seen incarnated in parents, in teachers, in all who are in 
any wise responsible for their training. The virtues that underlie 
personal and national character are the same. The state is its 
citizens. It is virtue as a practice, not as a sentiment or a theory, 
that crystallizes into character. If that "righteousness -yyhich 
exalteth a nation" is ever attained, it must be taught and illus- 
trated and practiced in the home and in the school. It must be 
founded on the rock of individual character. To its establish- 
ment the energies of all who have to do in any way with the 
public schools should be steadily and persistently directed. 

To the members of the school board, the supervisors, prin- 
cipals, and teachers, and to the citizens of Somerville in general, 
the hearty thanks of the superintendent are extended for their 
•efforts to strengthen and maintain the important work of the 
schools, as well as for personal sympathy and assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

December 22, 1905. G. A. Southworth. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 18' 



•ffn /iDemortam. 

At a meeting of the school board held June 26, 1905, the 
ifollowing was unanimously adopted, to be entered upon the 
records and a copy sent to the family of Mr. Nichols : — 

George E. Nichols, master of the Highland school, died at 
his home in Somerville June 7, 1905, after an illness of several 
months. 

Mr. Nichols was elected master of the Lincoln school in 
West Somerville July 21, 1877, and was transferred to the High- 
land school in 1881. His service in Somerville covered a period 
of twenty-seven years, one year's leave of absence having been 
granted him. 

Mr. Nichols was an excellent instructor, a genial and warm- 
liearted friend and companion, and a man of refined tastes and 
manners. He easily won the respect and afifection of his pupils, 
and the results of his labors will long abide in the lives of hun- 
'dreds who came under his influence. 



l^S ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



ORGANIZATION OF SOMERVILLE SCHOOLS. 



Information concerning our schools is frequently sought by 
citizens or by educators in other localities. J^bllowing are the 
principal facts concerning them: — 

Kindergartens. The city supports four kindergartens, in the 
Hanscom, Bennett, Baxter, and Glines schools. Vaccinated 
children between four and five years of age are admitted to the 
kindergarten nearest their residence during the months of Sep- 
tember and April, and may remain until the July following their 
fifth birthday. Sessions from 9 to 12. 

Head kindergartners receive $600. One trained assistant is 
allowed when the number exceeds thirty, at a salary of $275, 
$350, or $425, according to experience. Kindergarten teachers 
give five hours daily to their work, the afternoon being employed 
in visitation, preparation, mothers' meetings, and the like. 

Primary Schools. Our elementary school course covers nine 
years, the first three of which are spent in primary schools. Wk 
have one exclusively primary school building, the ninety-six pri- 
mary classes being distributed among twenty-three scho'olhouses. 

Vaccinated children five years of age, or who will reach that 
age on or before the first day of October, are admitted during the 
month of September only, provided they have never attended 
school before. Children able to enter existing classes will be ad- 
mitted at any time. Applications for admission should be made 
to the principal of the school. 

Only trained or experienced teachers are employed, the sala^ 
ries being $300, $375, $450, $525, $600, or $650, according to 
length of service. Normal training is equivalent to a year's ex- 
perience, and experience in other places is 'counted in determin- 
ing salary. 

First-grade teachers, with classes numbering fifty, are al- 
lowed an assistant, who is paid $200, $275, $350, or $425, accord- 
ing to years of service. 

Qrammar Schools. The grammar grades are found chiefly 
in twelve large buildings, of twelve or more rooms each. The 
course covers six years, and includes only those studies which 
the statute requires, with the addition of music, sewing, and ele- 
mentary science. 

The salaries of grammar school teachers are the same as 
those of primary teachers. Masters are paid $1,900, and their 
assistants $725. Other ninth-grade teachers are paid $700. 
Principals of smaller schools receive $725, $775, or $900 each. 

Promotions. Promotions in all grades, from the first to the 
thirteenth, are made in June by the regular teacher and the prin- 
cipal, with the approval of the supeiintendent and district com- 
mittee. They are based on the estimate of the pupil's daily work 
made by the teacher and recorded bi-monthly. An occasional 
brief, unannounced, written test is a factor in this estimate. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



189 



Where there is reasonable doubt of a student's fitness, he 
ii.ay be promoted on a trial of three months. In such cases the 
parent is notified and kept informed of his child's progress. At 
the end of this probationary period he may be returned to his for-^ 
nier grade, provided it seems for his interests. In 1905 eight 
per cent, of those promoted on trial fell back. 

Children capable of more rapid advancement may be pro^. 
moted one or more grades at anv time. Seventy-four were thus 
promoted in 1905. 

Fitness for graduation or for admission to the high schools. 
is determined in precisely the same way. Diplomas are given' in 
grammar and high schools to those who have satisfactorily com- 
pleted full courses. 

Latin High School. In September, 1895, in the forty-third 
year of its existence, the Somerville high school was divided, the 
classical, or college preparatory, departments remaining in the 
old building, erected in 1872, and the English departments occu- 
pying a new building, erected in 1894-'95. [ 

Some facts concerning the Latin school are presented in the 
following table : — 



School Year. 


Average 

Number 

Belonging. 


Number 
Entering. 


Gradu- 
ates. 


Cost of 
Instruction. 


Per Capita 
Cost. 


u 

H 


Pupils to a 
Teacher. 


1895-6 


257 


69 


50 


$11,702 


$45.57 


9 


28.6 


189C-7 


262 


81 


61 


11,840 


45.19 


9 


29.1 


1897-8 


273 


86 


55 


11,921 


43.67 


9 


30.3 


1898-9 


264 


78 


51 


11,935 


45.21 


9 


29.3 


1899-0 


245 


65 


48 


12,491 


50.98 


9 


27.2 


1900-1 


271 


104 


56 


12,676 


46.74 


9 


30.0 


1901-2 


314 


114 


56 


12,583 


40.13 


10 


31.4 


1902-3 


358 


125 


46 


14,170 


39.58 


11 


32.5 


1903-4 


398 


122 


73 


16,104 


4 


13 


30.6 


.1904-5 


411 


138 


76 


16,566 


40.31 


13 


31.6 



The object of the school is, primarily, to furnish a suitable 
preparation for those pupils who desire to pursue either a regular 
or a special course of study at higher institutions of learning, but 
the school is open to all pupils who wish to take the courses of 
study ofifered. 

The regular time for comipleting the course is four years. 
Pupils, at the request of their parents, can make the work of each 
year easier by taking five years for the course. Those who are 
capable, and have good reason for shortening the time of prepa- 
ration, are allowed to complete the course in as short a time as 
their ability will permit. 



190 



ANNUAL REPOKTS. 



Graduates of grammar schools are admitted to either high 
school on presenting a certificate of qualification signed by a 
master. All other pupils are admitted by an examination in 
grammar school studies, given usually on the day preceding the 
opening of the schools in September. 

The tuition for non-residents is the per capita cost for the 
year, payable in advance. The sessions of the school are from 
8.30 to 1.30. The salaries paid high school teachers range from 
$900 to $1,200 for women and from $1,000 to $3,000 for men. 

English High School. This school was organized in Septem- 
ber, 1895. Information concerning it is found in the following 
table : — 



School Year. 


Average 
Number 


Number 


Gradu- 


Cost of 


Per Capita 




Pupils to a 




Belonging. 


Entering. 


ates. 


Instruction. 


Cost. 




Teacher. 


1895-6 


456 


213 


67 


$20,102 


$44.13 


21 


21.7 


1896-7 


531 


235 


70 


23,010 


43.33 


21 


25.3 


1897-8 


535 


224 


75 


24,843 


46.44 


22 


24.3 


1898-9 


575 


231 


86 


26,159 


45.49 


23 


25.0 


1899-0 


669 


316 


83 


31,322 


46.82 


27 


24.8 


1900-1 


691 


249 


97 


32,739 


47.35 


30 


23.0 


1901-2 


738 


294 


108 


35,989 


48.74 


34 


21.7 


1902-3 


747 


264 


135 


36,843 


49.32 


33 


22.6 


1903-4 


728 


264 


106 


36,426 


50.04 


33 


22.1 


1904-5 


784 


339 


135 


39,634 


50.56 


33 


23.8 



The course of study covers four years. Graduates are ad- 
mitted to special courses when the conditions are favorable. 
Candidates for technical and normal schools take specific pre- 
paratory work. 

The wide range of elective studies is a distinctive feature of 
the school. The choice of the first year may be one of the fol- 
lowing: Latin, French, German, biology (botany and zoology), 
manual training, and mechanical drawing. To these, physics is 
added for the second year, and chemistry, geology, and 
astronomy for the third and fourth. After the second year two 
or more electives may be taken. Penmanship and commercial 
arithmetic may be taken the second year. 

During the third and fourth years the student may elect in 
a business course bookkeeping, commercial arithmetic, commer- 
cial law, penmanship, stenography, typewriting; in mathematics, 
advanced algebra, solid geometry, analytical geometry, and 
trigonometry; in advanced science, work in botany, zoology, 
physics, chemistry, and drawing. 

Of the fifteen periods of prepared work, the course pre- 
scribes ten periods the first year, eleven periods the second year, 



1 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 191 

seven periods the third year, and seven periods the fourth year. 
The pupil has the privilege of selecting from the list of elective 
studies subjects whose recitation periods each week, or their 
equivalents, when added to the required prepared work, shall 
equal the necessary fifteen periods. 

Concerning admission, sessions, etc., see Latin school. 

A simple, healthful, inexpensive lunch is served at the recess 
midway of each session to pupils desiring it. 

rianual Training. Three rooms are fitted and equipped in 
the basement of the English high school for its manual training 
department. The course includes carpentry, wood-turning, and 
carving, clay modeling, pattern making, moulding, and casting. 
A fourth room is devoted to mechanical drawing, with a full 
course. Manual training has not' been extended to include 
grammar schools. 

The sub-master in charge of the manual training department 
is paid $1,700, and his assistants $1,700, $1,300, and $800. 

Sewing. Sewing is taught to the girls in the fifth, sixth, 
seventh, and eighth grammar grades in weekly lessons of about 
one hour eacli. 

Three special teachers are employed at salaries of $650. 

riusic. Instruction in music is given exclusively in the high 
schools and in part in the three upper grammar grades by a 
specialist, who is paid $1,700. The books used are "The Euter- 
pean," 'The Cecilian Series of Music and Song,'^ Nos. 2, 3, and 
4, and 'The Laurel Song Book." 

In the six lower grades musical instruction is given by the 
regular grade teacher, under the supervision of a specialist, who 
visits each class once every fifteen days. She is paid $900. The 
Normal System of Music, with its books and charts, is used. 

Gymnastics. In elementary grades the Ling system of 
Swedish gymnastics is practiced daily. No special teacher is 
employed. 

Recesses. The Latin school has two brief recesses, breaking 
the daily session into thirds. The English school has a single 
recess at the end of the third period. 

The four lower elementary grades have a five-minute recess 
midway of each session. The five upper grammar grades have 
no recess, though no unreasonable physical restraint is placed 
upon any pupil. 

No detention of pupils is allowed at noon, and but a half- 
hour's detention at the close of the afternoon session, "for wilful 
neglect of duty only.'^ 

Corporal Punishment. Corporal punishment, "which in- 
cludes any infliction of physical pain or application of physical 
force," is not prohibited. It must, however, not be administered 
until twenty-four hours after the ofifence, the approval of the 



19^ ANNUAL REPORTS. 

principal being first obtained. Each case must be reported in 
detail to the superintendent. There were 270 cases in 1900, 284 
in 1901, 328 in 1902, 299 in 1903, 293 in 1904, and 339 in 1905. 

Drawing. Two teachers of drawing are employed in the 
English high school at salaries of $1,000 and $600. In that 
school freehand drawing is compulsory for first-year pupils, and 
elective for all others. Drawing is not taught in the Latin 
school. A few Latin school pupils take (^rawing in the English 
school. , 'V 

In the primary grades daily lessons, and in the grammar 
grades semi-weekly lessons are given by the regular teacher, 
under the direction of a supervisor, who visits each class once a 
rhonth, and is paid $1,000. 

The course includes pictorial drawing from nature, models, 
and objects; structural drawing from type solids; decorative 
drawing, designing, and color work, historic ornament and 
picture-study. No drawing books are used. Colored crayons 
are provided in primary grades, and water-colors and brush in 
grammar grades. 

Penmanship. Intermedial slant writing is taught in the ele- 
mentary schools, the Whitehouse system being used. The 
supervisor visits each class once in four weeks, and receives 
$1,500. 

Student Teachers. At the present time two student teachers 
are employed in the Latin school, and two in the English. Each 
serves without pay, under the direction of the head master. 

The Public Library. The Enghsh school has a working 
library of 1,200 volumes, but it draws constantly on the public 
library, located in an adjoining building. 

For many years there has been a constant use of the library 
by school children. Circulating libraries of fresh books are in 
use in the smaller buildings. Books are delivered and collected 
each week at the large grammar schools. As far as they can, 
the teachers aid in the selection of books by the children, and the 
librarian and his assistants cheerfully render all the help in their 
power. 

Evening Schools. An evening high school is maintained in 
the English high school building on four evenings a week, from 
7.30 to 9.30. The principal is paid $6, and his assistants $4, $3, 
$2, and $1.50. Any high school study, and freehand and me- 
chanical drawing, may be pursued. 

Elementary evening schools are open in the Prescott, Bell, 
Forster, and Highland buildings from October 1 on four even- 
ings a week, from 7.30 to 9.30. The length of the term is de- 
pendent on the interest and attendance. The course of study 
followed is that prescribed by the statute. Principals receive $3 
or $4, and assistants $2, $1.50, or $1 each evening. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 193 

Truants. The city employs one active truant officer, who is 
paid $1,100 and the board of his horse. Truants are sent to 
the county truant school at North Chelmsford. There are now 
eight truants from Somerville in the school. 

Janitors. These important officers are appointed by the 
commissioner of public buildings, and are under his direction 
and that of the school principal. 

Supervision. The superintendent of schools is the execu- 
tive officer of the board, and upon him devolves the general 
management of the schools under its direction. He serves as 
the secretary of the board and as supply agent. His salary is 
$3,000, and he is allowed a clerk, who receives $750. His office 
is in the city hall annex, and his hours are from 4 to 5 each 
school day, and from 8 to 9 on Saturday. His office is open 
from 8 to 12 and from 1.30 to 5 on school days, and from 8 to 10 
on Saturday. 

' The meetings of the school board are held on the last Mon- 
day evening of each month, except July, August, and December, 
at 8.15 o'clock. 



194 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



CONTENTS OF APPENDIX. 



Concerning Finance. 

No. of Table 

1. Schedule of school property 

2. Cost of maintaining schools, 1905 

3. Cost per capita of maintaining schools, 1905 

4. Cost of maintaining schools for a series of years 

5. Cost per capita for maintaining schools for a series of years 

6. Amount spent annually for new school buildings and for re* 

pairs for a series of years 

Concerning Pupils. 

7. Population and school census 

8. Attendance, etc., of the schools for 1905 

9. Statistics of the high schools, for school year 1904-1905 

10. Pupils by grades, December, 1905 

11. Separate statistics for grammar and primary schools, 1905. 

12. Admissions to first grade in September 

13. Number of grammar school graduates, 1905 

14. Truant statistics 

15. Evening school statistics, 1904-1905 

16. Grammar school graduates for a series of years 

17. Attendance statistics of all schools for a series of years 

18. Statistics of the high school for a series of years 

19. Promotions, 1905 



20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 

24. 



25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 



Concerning Teachers. 

Resignations of teachers, 1905 

Teachers elected in 1905 

Leave of absence of teachers 

Transfers of teachers 

Number of teachers employed for a series of years 

Miscellaneous. 

Changes in text-books, 1905 

High school graduation exercises, 1905 

Grammar school graduation exercises, 1905 

Organization of school board for 1906 

Teachers in service January, 1906 

Officers in service January, 1906 

School janitors 



SCHOOL DEPAETMENT. 



195 



TABLE 1.— SCHOOLHOUSES. 







wi 








'O 








E 
o 
o 




Valuation, 


S 












Size of 




3 
J3 


«J 






Namh. 


en 

o 


Lot. 


including 




c3 

<u 


Enlargements.. 






o 




Furniture. 


$ 


*o 








6 

al3 








6 
33 




1 


Latin High . . . 




$62,000 


1871 




2 


English High . . 


bl9 




137,600 


1895 


9 




3 


Prescott .... 


12 


22,000 


66,250 


1867 


37 




4 


Knapp 


12 


24,517 


50,340 


1889 


15 


4 rooms added 1894 


6 


Pope 


12 


27,236 


80,860 


1891 


13 




6 


Bell 


12 


22,262 


45,340 


1874 


30 


( 4 rooms added 1882 
j 4 rooms added 1892 


7 


Edgerly .... 


12 


24,000 


44,250 


1871 


33 


8 


Glines 


14 


28,800 


80,800 


1891 


13 


5 rooms added 1896 


9 


Forster .... 


18 


30,632 


85,350 


1866 


38 


6 rooms added 1899 


10 


Bingham .... 


16 


35,586 


60,000 


1886 


18 


j 4 rooms added 1894 
1 8 rooms added 1904 


11 


Carr 


16 


20,450 


53,800 


1898 


6 




12 


Morse 


12 


29,000 


48,200 


1869 


35 


6 rooms added 1890 


13 


Highland . . . 


12 


23,260 


60,560 


1880 


24 


4 rooms added 1891 


14 


Hodgkins . . . 


14 


35,034 


71,550 


1896 


8 




15 


Bennett .... 


12 


17,000 


59,248 


1902 


2 




16 


Proctor .... 


9 




41.029 


1905 


1 




17 


Burns 


8 


16,080 


34,700 


1886 


18 


4 rooms added 1899 


18 


Lowe 


8 


21,650 


51.826 


1903 


1 




19 


Hanscom . . . 


6 


12,756 


49,580 


1897 


7 




20 


Baxter .... 


6 


11,000 


32,956 


1901 


3 




21 


Perry 


6 


46,080 


37,000 


1899 


5 




22 


Brown .... 


6 


20,093 


39,690 


1901 


3 




23 


Davis 


4 


30,155 


22,720 


1884 


20 




24 


Cummings . . . 


4 


11,300 


11,920 


1884 


20 




25 


Durell 


4 


13,883 


19,720 


1894 


10 




26 


Lincoln .... 


4 

269 


17,662 


18,220 


1885 


19 






Total . . . 




$1,365,509 





•• 





(a) Including six recitation rooms. There are also a physical laboratory and three teachers' 
rooms. 

(b) A chemical, a physical, a biological laboratory, a recitation room, a lecture hall, drawing 
room, two teachers' rooms, library, and principal's office. Four manual training rooms and lunch 
room in basement. 

The biological and physical laboratories and the lecture hall furnish four classrooms. 



:196 



ANNUAL KEPORTS. 



TABLE 2.— COST OF MAINTAINING SCHOOLS, 1905. 



Schools. 


Teachers. 


Care. 


Supplies. 


Total. 


Latin High . 


$16,840 00 


$1,816 25 


$1,710 95 


$20,367 20 


English High 




40,171 15 


3,347 33 


4,704 97 


48,223 45 


Prescott 




11,057 28 


1,582 64 


560 82 


13,200 74 


Knapp . 






10,776 44 


1,663 08 


693 40 


13,132 92 


Pope 






10,478 52 


1,817 25 


598 93 


12,894 70 


Bell 






10,407 20 


1,530 62 


858 41 


12,796 23 


Edgerly 






10,741 42 


1,481 09 


782 16 


13,004 67 


Glines . 






12,760 97 


2,447 48 


707 44 


15,915 89 


Forster 






14,464 26 


2,607 41 


723 15 


17,794 82 


Bingham 






13,158 51 


1,892 68 


728 11 


15,779 30 


Carr 






13,783 79 


2,157 53 


750 90 


16,692 22 


Morse . 






10,842 07 


1,814 83 


976 25 


13,633 15 


Highland 






10,246 34 


1,818 33 


957 80 


13,022 47 


Hodsrkins 






11,908 03 


1,592 33 


865 32 


14,365 68 


Bennett 






9,595 32 


1,557 97 


297 20 


11,450 49 


Burns . 






6,559 82 


1,179 97 


403 88 


8,143 67 


Proctor 






2,299 17 


325 95 


1,379 01 


4,004 13 


Lowe . 






5,750 08 


1,077 41 


304 35 


7,131 84 


Hanscom 






4,677 78 


978 30 


277 39 


5,933 47 


Baxter . 






4,565 51 


906 27 


265 44 


5,737 22 


Perry . 






4,253 41 


1,065 82 


173 73 


5,492 96 


Brown . 






4,330 61 


1,019 58 


310 50 


5,660 69 


Davis . 






2,835 25 


829 33 


94 72 


3,759 30 


Cummings 






2,865 49 


783 75 


189 31 


3,838 55 


Durell . 






2,895 25 


748 92 


161 50 


3,805 67 


Lincoln 






2,940 45 


686 29 


181 59 


3,808 33 


Evening 






8,393 00 


3,214 48 


479 59 


12,087 07 


Totals . 


$259,597 12 


$41,942 89 


$20,136 82 


$321,676 83 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



197 



TABLE 3.— PER CAPITA COST OF MAINTAINING SCHOOLS, 1905. 



Schools. 


Teachers. 


Care. 


Supplies. 


Total. 


Latin High . 


$40 29 


$4 34 


$4 09- 


$48 72 


English High 




48 57 


4 05 


5 69 


58 31 


Prescott 




19 13 


2 74 


97 


22 84 


Knapp . 






19 70 


3 04 


1 27 


24 01 


Pope 






20 15 


3 49 


1 15 


24 79 


Bell 






19 94 


2 93 


1 64 


24 51 


Edgerly 






19 42 


2 68 


1 41 


23 51 


Glines . 






20 38 


3 91 


1 13 


25 42 


Forster 






20 12 


3 63 


1 01 


24 76 


Bingham 






20 00 


2 88 


1 11 


23 99 


Carr 






19 22 


3 01 


1 05 


23 28 


Morse . 






19 50 


3 26 


1 76 


24 52 


Highland 






19 97 


3 54 


1 87 


25 38 


Hodgkins 






19 75 


2 64 


1 44 


23 83 


Bennett 






19 42 


3 15 


60 


23 17 


Burns 






17 45 


3 14 


1 07 


21 66 


Proctor 






15 86 


2 25 


3 81 


21 92 


Lowe 






15 46 


2 90 


82 


19 18 


Hanscom 






16 36 


3 42 


97 


20 75 


Baxter . 






17 36 


3 45 


1 01 


21 82 


Perry 






16 61 


4 16 


68 


21 45 


Brown . 






15 69 


3 69 


1 13 


20 51 


Davis 






15 93 


4 6Q 


53 


21 12 


Cummings 






17 37 


4 75 


1 15 


23 27 


Durell . 






16 00 


4 14 


89 


21 03 


Lincoln .... 


15 16 


3 54 


94 


19 64 


High schools 


$45 79 


$4 15 


$5 15 


$55 09 


Gram, and primary 


19 67 


3 57 


1 33 


24 57 


All schools . 


22 50 


3 63 


1 74 


27 87 


Gram, and prim, with- 










out evening schools . 


18 86 


3 26 


1 29 


23 41 


All schools without 










evening schools 


21 76 


3 36 


1 70 


26 82 



198 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



TABLE 4.— ANNUAL COST OF MAINTAINING THE SCHOOLS 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 

Amounts are given to the nearest dollar and include what has been paid for 
maintaining day and evening schools of all grades. 





Average 


Instruction 


Water 










Year. 


Member- 


and 


and 


Heating. 


Janitors. 


School 


Total. 




ship. 


Supervision. 


Light. 






Supplies. 




1885 


4,904 


$79,506 


$728 


$4,965 


$4,000 


$8,449 


$97,648 


1886 


4,985 


83,542 


624 


4,929 


4,194 


6,676 


99,865 


1887 


5,198 


86,713 


765 


6,475 


5,084 


7,526 


106,563 


1888 


5,488 


88,967 


953 


7,121 


. 5,892 


7,421 


110,354 


1889 


5,956 


96,466 


805 


6,081 


6,448 


9,903 


119,703 


1890 


6,486 


104,184 


1,004 


5,586 


7,539 


10,371 


128,684 


1891 


6,502 


114,066 


1,047 


8,032 


8,544 


13 899 


145,588 


1892 


7,035 


124,232 


1,064 


7,148 


9,794 


12,944 


155,183 


1893 


7,217 


128,720 


1,014 


8,312 


10,160 


10,137 


158,333 


1894 


7,212 


132,919 


958 


9,673 


10,686 


10,919 


165,155 


1895 


7,617 


144,113 


1,398 


8,796 


11,581 


15,063 


180,951 


1896 


8,077 


161,551 


1,469 


9,962 


14,160 


17,601 


204,743 


1897 


8,589 


180,222 


1,920 


10,065 


16,251 


14,815 


223,273 


1898 


9,085 


189,244 


2,075 


9,767 


17,393 


14,986 


233,465 


1899 


9,502 


197,660 


2,472 


10,821 


17,831 


16,131 


244,915 


1900 


9,823 


212,863 


1,729 


10,840 


19,236 


15.735 


260,403 


1901 


9,991 


226,556 


1,731 


13,723 


20,078 


18,707 


280,796 


1902 


10,402 


234,210 


1,803 


10,4S9 


20,859 


19,386 


286,747 


1903 


10.719 


242.964 


2,015 


18,052 


21,042 


20,873 


304,946 


1904 


11.094 


255,481 


1,43« 


15,315 


22,024 


21,648* 


315,904 


1905 


11,543 


259.597 


4,345 


15,167 


21,949 


20,619* 


321,677 



♦Including cost of telephones. 



SCHOOL DEPAETMENT. 



199 



TABLE 5.— ANNUAL COST PER CAPITA OF MAINTAINING 

SCHOOLS 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 
[ Based on the average membership. ] 



Year. 


Instruction 

and 
Supervision. 


Janitors, 
Water, 

Heat, and 
Light. 


School 
Supply- 
Expenses. 


Total. 


Assessors' Valua- 
tion of City. 


Ratio of 
Cost of 
School Main- 
tenance to 
Valuation. 


1885 


$16 21 


$1 98 


$1 72 


$19 91 


$24,878,400 


.00392 


1886 


16 76 


1 94 


1 34 


20 03 


26,003,200 


.00384 


1887 


16 68 


2 37 


1 45 


20 50 


27,469,300 


.00388 


1888 


16 21 


2 54 


1 36 


20 11 


28,756,400 


.00384 


1889 


16 20 


2 24 


1 66 


20 10 


30,004,600 


.00399 


1890 


16 06 


2 18 


1 60 


19 84 


32,557,500 


.00395 


1891 


17 54 


2 71 


2 14 


22 39 


36,843,400 


.00395 


1892 


17 66 


2 56 


1 84 


22 06 


38,093,100 


.00407 


1893 


17 84 


2 70 


1 40 


21 94 


41,773,600 


.00379 


1894 


18 43 


2 96 


1 51 


22 90 


44,142,900 


.00374 


1895 


18 92 


2 86 


1 98 


23 76 


46,506,300 


.00390 


1896 


20 00 


3 17 


2 18 


25 35 


49,013,050 


.00418 


1897 


20 98 


3 29 


1 73 


26 00 


50,173,775 


.00444 


1898 


20 83 


3 22 


1 65 


25 70 


50,739,700 


.00460 


1899 


20 80 


3 28 


1 70 


25 78 


51,202,350 


.00478 


1900 


21 67 


3 24 


1 m 


26 51 


52,513,400 


.00496 


1901 


22 67 


3 56 


I 87 


28 10 


53,924,200 


.00521 


1902 


22 .52 


3 19 


1 86 


27 57 


55,485,370 


.00517 


1903 


22 67 


3 84 


1 9o 


28 46 


56, 981., 360 


.00535 


1904 


23 03 


3 52 


1 93 


28 48 


58,056,700 


.00544 


1905 


22 50 


3 63 


1 74 


27 87 


59,146,600 


.00544 



TABLE 6.— A/VIOUNT SPENT ANNUALLY FOR ALL SCHOOL 

PURPOSES 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 










For Repairs and 




Amount Spent 


Year. 


For New 


Permanent 


For Maintaining 


for all 




Schoolhouses. 


Improvements. 


Schools. 


School Purposes. 


1885 


$19,185 


$7,052 


$97,648 


$113,885 


1886 


15,515 


8,706 


99,865 


114,086 


1887 


14,839 


13,636 


106,563 


135,038 


1888 


4,996 


13,994 


110,354 


129,344 


1889 


20,167 


14,225 


119,703 


154,095 


1890 


75,775 


19,168 


128,684 


223,627 


1891 


84,902 


14,847 


145.588 


245,337 


1892 


12,679 


17,734 


155,183 


176,001 


1893 


22,809 


12,440 


158,333 


193,582 


1894 


82,206 


44,764 


165,155 


292,125 


1895 


87,680 


15,651 


180,951 


284.282 


1896 


61,016 


33,240 


204,743 


298,999 


1897 


46,621 


20,507 


223,273 


290,400 


1898 


49,983 


21,274 


233,465 


304,722 


1899 


72,516 


15,637 


244,915 


333,068 


1900 


51,232 


21,745 


260,403 


333,380 


1901 


49,203 


11,000 


280,796 


340,999 


1902 


56,501 


13,079 


286,747 


356,327 


1903 


59,822 


12,261 


304,946 


377 029 


1904 


23,703 


18,209 


315 904 


357.816 


1905 


51,987 


8,306 


321,677 


381,970 



200 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 7.— POPULATION AND SCHOOL CENSUS. 



1842 . . 1,013 


1875 


. . 21,594 


1900 . 


. 61,643 


1850 . . 3,540 


1880 


. 24,985 


1901 . 


. 63,000 


1860 . . 8,025 


1885 


. 29,992 


1902 . 


. 65,273 


1865 . . 9,366 


1890 


. 40,117 


1903 . 


. 67,500 


1870 . . 14,693 


1895 


. 52,200 


1905 . 


. 69,272 


SCHOOL 


CENSUS, 


1905. 




0. of children between 5 and 15 


years of age October 1, 








1904. 


1905. 


Change^ 


Wardl . 




1,866 


1,929 


+ 63 


Ward 2 




2,546 


2,536 


—10 


Ward 3 . 




975 


1,100 


-1-125 


Ward 4 . 




926 


1,042 


+116 


Ward 5 . 




1,869 


1,911 


+42 


Ward 6 . 




1,710 


1,972 


+262 


Ward 7 . 


• 


1,416 


1,479 
11,969 


H-63 


Total . 


11,308 


+ 661 


In public schools 




10,004 


10,226 


+222 


In private schools . 


. 


1,549 


1,601 


+52 


Out of school 


• 


388 


346 


—42 



Total 



11,941 



12,173 



+232 



Number of compulsory school age, 7 to 14 







1905. 


According to census, males 


• • • 


4,194 


females 


. 


4,201 


In public schools, males 


3,627 




females 


3,512 


7,139 


In private schools, males 


532 




females . 


595 


1,127 



Total in school 



8,395 



8,266 



Number of illiterate minors 51 

Children under 7 out of school 182 

" between 7 and 14 out on account of sickness . 38 

" 14 years old at work ....... 75 

Total number out of school 346 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



201 



TABLE 8.— ATTENDANCE OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS, 1905. 















a 

T3 u 


.S 

W) . 

c >- 


Mo. to 
m in 
ber. 


O w 

8-S 


Schools. 


3 a 

C O 






p 


c n 
6 


*J (J 



§E 
« ii <u 

Mot 

ca u) 1) 

-0" 


« 












Z 


^ 


< 


12 


Latin High 


443 


418 


402 


96.1 


418 


444 


37.0 


19 


English High 


848 


827 


790 


95.4 


795 


917 


27.8 


12 


Prescott 


761 


578 


546 


94.5 


588 


594 


50.7 


12 


Knapp 




683 


547 


521 


95.3 


570 


555 


46.3 


12 


Pope . 




612 


520 


493 


94.8 


534 


554 


46.2 


12 


Bell . 




612 


522 


498 


95.3 


522 


518 


43.2 


12 


Edgerly 




638 


553 


522 


94.4 


564 


559 


46.6 


14 


Glines . 




820 


626 


592 


95.1 


659 


603 


43.1 


18 


Forster 




854 


719 


674 


93.7 


752 


744 


41.2 


16 


Bingham 




814 


658 


623 


94.8 


668 


690 


43.1 


16 


Carr 




891 


717 


671 


93.6 


753 


707 


45.2 


12 


Morse . 




713 


556 


527 


95.0 


589 


553 


46.0 


12 


Highland 




580 


513 


486 


94.7 


538 


536 


44.0 


14 


Hodgkins 




739 


603 


574 


95.3 


595 


630 


45.7 


12 


Bennett 




674 


494 


457 


92.6 


495 


510 


41.5 


8 


Burns . 




508 


376 


349 


92.7 


402 


363 


45.5 


8 


Proctor* 




84 


362 


344 


94.8 




373 


46.6 


8 


Lowe . 




518 


372 


345 


92.7 


385 


379 


47.3 


6 


Hanscom 




400 


286 


267 


93.7 


282 


290 


48.0 


6 


Baxter 




364 


263 


248 


94.5 


256 


284 


47.3 


6 


Perry . 




346 


256 


243 


94.8 


257 


281 


46.8 


6 


Brown 




377 


276 


258 


93.6 


283 


286 


47.7 


4 


Davis . 




253 


178 


168 


93.9 


185 


187 


46.8 


4 


Cummings 




228 


165 


152 


92.0 


168 


174 


43.0 


4 


Durell 




252 


l&l 


171 


94.7 


187 


190 


47.5 


4 


Lincoln 




284 


194 


183 


94.3 


206 


197 


49.3 


269 


Total 




14,296 


,11,543 


10,897 


94.4 


11,652 


12,118 


45.2 


262 


Total for 1904 . 


13,804 


11,094 


10,422 


93.9 


11,128 


11,787 


48.2 



*For four months. 



•202 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 9.— STATISTICS OF HIGH SCHOOLS FOR SCHOOL 
YEAR, SEPrBMBER 7, 1904, TO JUNE 30, 1905. 



Number of teachers . 
Number of days school kept 
Number enrolled 
Average number belonging 
Average daily attendance . 
Per cent, of attendance 
Tardiness .... 
Dismissals .... 
In Class I. September, 1904 
June 

Per cent, of loss 
In Class II. September, 1904 
June 

Per cent, of loss 
In Class III. September, 1904 
June 

Per cent, of loss 
In Class IV. September, 1904 
June 

Per cent, of loss 
Special students, September, 1904 
June 
Total, September, 1904 
June 

Per cent, of loss 
Number of graduates, male 
Number of graduates, female 

Total .... 
Average age, male 
Average age, female . 
Number entering college . 
Number of graduates entering technical schools 
Number of graduates entering normal schools 
Cost of instruction 
Cost of supplies and equipment 
Total cost .... 
Per capita cost of instruction 
Per capita cost of supplies and equipment 
Total cost per capita .... 




13 
186 
430 
411 
396 

96.1 
234 
269 
138 
124 

10 
112 
106 
5.4 

90 

83 
7.7 

82 

80 
2.4 



422 
393 
6.9 

40 

36 

76 

18-10 

18-9 

46 



$16,566 00 

1,254 08 

17,820 08 

40 31 

3 05 

43 36 



English. 



35 
186 
867 
784 
749 

95.6 
305 
260 
285 
239 

16.1 
227 
203 

10.5 
166 
145 

12.6 
150 
141 
6 

18 

7 

846 

735 

13.1 

55 

80 
135 

19-1 

18-9 
3 



$39,634 00 

4,651 77 

44,285 77 

50 56 

5 93 

56 49 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



203 



TABLE 10.— PUPILS BY GRADES, 1905. 





Grade. 


Teachers. 


Pupils. 


Average 
Age. 


o 
o 

u 

CO 

P <u 

■'-' u 

u O 


U 

0(73 








Women 


O 


o 


o 
H 


t« 

u 


c 
o 




School. 




t/i 

C 

en 
'33 
to 

< 


u 
<u . 

Oc/J 


'Latin 
<( 

(f 


Thirteenth . . 
Twelfth . . . 
Eleventh . . 
Tenth . . , 

Total . . . 

Special . . . 
Thirteenth . . 
Twelfth . . . 
Eleventh . . 
Tenth . . . 

Total . . . 

Total high 
school 

Ninth . . . 
Eighth . . , 
Seventh . . . 
Sixth . . . 
Fifth . . . 
Fourth . . . 

Total gram- 
mar . . . 

Third . . . 
Second . . • 
First .... 

Total pri- 
mary . . 

Total gram- 
mar and 
primary , 

Kindergarten . 

Special teach- 
ers .... 

Grand totals 


5 






40 
37 
41 
53 


53 
55 
79 
86 


93 

92 

120 

139 


18 
17 
16 
15 


2 

5 
3 




4 

5 

2 

127 


5 
3 

4 
12 




8 




171 


273 


444 








138 


24 


English 








3 

51 

84 

100 

153 


11 

89 

105 

124 

197 


14 
140 
189 

224 
350 


19 
18 
17 
16 
15 


5 
5 
4 
6 
6 




6 


"l 


<( 




10 

4 

351 


4 
11 

29 




10 


25 




391 


526 


917 








371 


45 




15 


33 





562 


799 


1,361 
























Grammar 


10 


1» 
20 
21 

28 
27 
28 


.... 


312 
422 

484 
590 
627 
638 


378 
495 
483 
562 
562 
636 


690 

917 

967 

1,152 

1,189 

1,274 


14 
13 
12 
11 
10 
9 


8 
9 

10 

11 

11 

9 




40 
64 
160 
260 
339 
252 


36 

68 

79 

109 

158 

173 




10 


143 

31 
31 
34 




3,073 


3,116 


6,189 








1,115 


623 












Primary 


"s" 


667 
756 
841 


669 
700 
740 


1,336 
1,456 
1,581 


8 
7 
6 


7 
5 
2 


1,174 


274 
306 
165 


178 
200 

227 






96 


3 


2,2M 


2,109 


4,373 






1,191 


845 


605 












10 


239 


3 


5,337 


5,225 


10,562 






1,191 


1,960 


1,228 












2 


4 
5 


4 


94 


101 


195 


4 


7 






































27 


281 


7 


5,993 


6,125 


12.118 




1,191 


2,331 


1,273 









204 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



TABLE 11.— PUPILS IN HIGH AND GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 





High 
Schools. 


Grammar 

and Primary 

Schools 


Kinder- 
gartens. 


Total. 


Annual enrollment 


1,291 


13,005 


412 


14,708 


Average membership . 


1,245 


10,298 


195 


11,738 


Average attendance 


1,192 


9.705 


174 


11,071 


Per cent, of attendance 


95.7 


94.2 


89.2 


94.3 


Number cases of tardiness . 


609 


3,137 


... 


3,746 


Number cases of dismissal . 


515 


1,949 


. • . 


2,464 


Number cases of punishment 


• • > 


337 


. > • 


337 


Membership, January, 1905 


1,213 


10,439 


190 


11.842 


Membership, December, 1905 


1,361 


10,562 


195 


12,118 



TABLE 12.— NUMBER OF PUPILS ADMITTED TO GRADE U 

IN SEPTEMBER. 



School. 



Prescott 
Hanscom 
Davis . 
Bennett 
Baxter 
Knapp 
Perry . 
Pope . 
Bell . 
Cummings 
Edgerly 
Glines 



1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


49 


69 


53 


63 


78 


42 


41 


75 


38 


47 


37 


43 


50 


42 


42 


41 


73 


98 


92 


36 


34 


35 


27 


38 


53 


40 


38 


38 


50 


43 


48 


42 


49 


50 


58 


26 


37 


37 


40 


33 


34 


37 


36 


38 


36 


31 


39 


40 


37 


43 


36 


51 


33 


40 


34 


70 


80 


65 


48 


70 



School. 



Forster . 

Bingham 

Carr . 

Morse 

Proctor 

Durell 

Burns 

Brown 

Highland 

Hodgkins 

Lincoln . 

Lowe 



1901. 



80 
78 
61 
75 



40 
68 
40 
44 
70 
25 



1902, 



77 
84 
44 
76 



44 
71 
56 
51 
61 
35 



1903. 



65 

74 
59 
78 



33 
57 
33 



33 
40 
95 



1904. 



76 
78 
59 
67 



38 

58 
26 



51 

38 
89 



1905. 



48 
80 
59 
56 
49 
45 
50 
42 



43 

40 



SCHOOL DEPAKTMENT. 



205 



TABLE 13.— GRAMMAR SCHOOL GRADUATES, 1905. 



"* 


;§ 


Number 


Number en- 


Number enter- 






B 
o 


certificated for 


tering 


, ^"S , , 


Total. 




'ft 

5 

to 

a 


High bchool. 


Latin School. 


English School 








>^ 


>. 




>» 


>> 


Schools. 


> 


>, 


a 


>, 


rt 


>, 


'c3 


>» 


rt 




« 




a 


•^ 


a 




c 




C 




0) 


'eS 

a 


.2 




.2 




o 


g 


.2 




u 


o 


•73 


o 


'O 


O 


•a 




73 




(U 


•4-* 


a 


*^ 


c 


+^ 


c 


^ 


c 






•73 


o 


13 


o 


"O 


o 


T3 


o 




g 






a 




B 


u 


S 








o 




o 




o 


c 


c 


a 




55 


u 


1^ 


U 


p 


U 


t3 


U 


'P 


Prescott . 


40 


3 


36 


1 


5 


4 


15 


5 


20 


Knapp 






48 


2 


45 





8 


2 


24 


2 


32 


Pope 






42 


7 


35 


3 


5 


4 


17 


7 


22 


Bell . 






40 





40 





11 





23 





34 


Edgerly 






47 


11 


36 





6 


2 


26 


2 


32 


Glines 






36 


5 


29 





5 


2 


16 


2 


21 


Forster 






74 


15 


56 


4 


27 


7 


30 


11 


57 


Bingham 






31 


3 


27 








1 


19 


1 


19 


Carr 






58 


9 


46 





8 


4 


26 


4 


34 


Morse 






44 


]0 


34 





9 


6 


21 


6 


30 


Highland 






85 


11 


73 





15 


7 


51 


7 


66 


Hodgkins 






61 
606 


7 


53 


2 


15 


3 


29 


5 


44 


Total . 


83 


510 


10 


114 


42 


297 


52 


411 



TABLE 14.— TRUANT STATISTICS. 





1900. 

501 

470 

105 

6 

4 

4 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


Number visits of officer to schools . 

Absences investigated 

Cases of truancy .»,... 

Truants arrested 

Sent to truant school 

Number now in truant school .... 


470 

502 

106 

8 

9 

10 


435 

384 
163 

*6 
9 


525 

521 

152 

24 

9 

5 


429 

387 

146 

8 

5 

5 


567 

514 

150 

7 

4 

8 



206 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



TABLE 15.— ATTENDANCE IN ELEMENTARY EVENING 
SCHOOLS, SEASON OF 1904=1905. 





of 
of 

ers 

nd 

)er 

ve. 
i^e. 




Prescott. 


Bell. 


Forster. 


Highland. 


Total. 


Enrolled . 


Male 
Female 

Total 


61 

18 


334 

88 


78 
41 


83 
44 


556 
191 




79 


422 


119 


127 


747 


Ave. membership 


Male 
Female 


45 
14 


197 
54 


31 
15 


37 
25 


303 

103 




Total 


59 


251 


46 


62 


406 


Ave. attendance 


Male 
Female 


1 34 
12 


152 
42 


24 

12 


26 
19 


231 

81 




Total 


46 


194 


36 


45 


329 


Per cent. Att. out 
No. belonging 

Per cent. Att. out 
enrollment 


• 


78.0 
58.2 


77.3 
46.0 


78.3 
30.3 


72.6 
35.4 


81.0 
44.0 


Ave. No. of teach 


Male 
Female 


2 
2 


2 
18 


1 
3 


2 

2 


7 
25 




Total 


4 


20. 


4 


4 


82 


No. of sessions 


• 


79 


79 


79 


63 


300 


Teachers, cost of 
Janitors, supplies, a 
light, cost of . 


^ 


$682 50 
182 21 


$2,898 50 
568 77 


$594 00 

351 75 


$632 00 
178 36 


$4,807 00 
1,281 09 




Total 


$864 71 


$3,467 27 


$945 75 


$810 36 


$6,088 09 


Cost per pupil i 

evening . 
Cost per evening 
Cost per pupil in a 

membership . 
Cost per pupil in a^ 

attendance 




$0 238 
10 95 

14 66 

18 80 


$0 226 
43 89 

13 81 

17 87 


$0 332 
11 97 

20 56 

26 27 


$0 285 

12 86 

13 07 
18 01 


$0 247 
81 17 

15 00 

19 45 



Average attendance : — October . 417 November 

December . 316 January . 266 February . 208 



399 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



2or 



TABLE 15 (Concluded). —Evening High School, Season of 1904=1905. 

Male. Female. Total. 

Enrolled 454 , 308 762 

Average membership 236 ^ 200 436 

Average attendance 128 96 224 

Number of teachers 11 9 20' 



Number of sessions, High School 74 

Number of sessions, Drawing 39 

Cost of instruction $4,243.00 

Cost of supplies, j anitors, and light 2,456,37 



Total cost 

Cost per pupil per evening.. . 

Average attendance: — 

High School. 

. October 291 

November 245 

December 166 

January 116 

February 92 



.$0,699.37 
0.404 



Drawing School 

October 96 

November 92 

December 81 

January 71 

February 62 



Statistics of Evening Schools for a Series of Years. 













1 




to 

C 
O 


c 






0,-2 




to 


"o 


2 s 








o 


a 


> t: 


t/3 

o 


5S ^ 

O (U 




^ 


W 


<< 


11,433 


UOh 


High* 1900-1901 . . 


48 


192 


79 


10 378 


1901-1902 . . 


46 


211 


99 


1,424 


316 


1902-1903 . . 


47 


178 


78 


1,331 


379 


1903-1904 . . 


48 


191 


74 


1,378 


388 


1904-1905 . . 


74 


762 


262 


0,699 


404 


Elementary 1900-1901 . . 


74t 


612 


220 


$3,809 


$0 232 


1901-1902 . . 


75 


700 


260 


5,452 


279 


1902-1903 . . 


86 


741 


264 


5,857 


JIO 257 


1903-1904 . . 


92 


859 


333 


7,286 


237 


1904-1905 . . 


75 


747 


329 


6,088 


247 



*Drawing school only until 1904-1905. 



[■Average of four schools. 



208 



ANNUAL REPOKTS. 



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SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



209 



TABLE 17. — ATTENDANCE STATISTICS 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 















Ratio of 




Enrollment. 


Average 


Average 


Per cent, of 


Number of 


Tardiness 


Dbcember. 


Membership. 


Attendance. 


Attendance. 


Tardinesses. 


to Average 














Attendance. 


1885 


6,276 


4,904 


4,627 


94.4 


2,480 


0.536 


1886 


6,350 


4,985 


4,678 


93.8 


2,834 


0.606 


1887 


6,605 


5,198 


4,879 


93.8 


2,699 


0.553 


1888 


7,262 


5,488 


5,174 


94.0 


2,938 


0.549 


1889 


7,757 


5,956 


5,585 


93.8 


2,780 


0.498 


1890 


7,878 


6,485 


6,075 


93.6 


3,133 


0.516 


1891 


8,510 


6,502 


6,091 


93.7 


3,182 


0.522 


1892 


9,120 


7,035 


6,608 


93.9 


3,181 


0.481 


1893 


9,632 


7,217 


6,790 


94.1 


3,375 


0.497 


1894 


9,387 


7,212 


6,840 


94.8 


3,000 


0.419 


1895 


9,913 


7,617 


7,255 


95.2 


2,736 


0.377 


1896 


10,582 


8,077 


7,663 


94.9 


2,743 


0.358 


1897 


11,293 


8,589 


8,144 


94.8 


2,486 


0.305 


1898 


11,577 


9,085 


8,636 


95.1 


2,941 


0.341 


1899 


11,975 


9,502 


8,965 


94.3 


2,566 


0.286 


1900 


12,345 


9,823 


9,174 


93.4 


2,759 


0.300 


1901 


12,499 


9,991 


9,350 


93.6 


2,937 


0.294 


1902 


13,116 


10,402 


9,733 


93.5 


3,335 


0.343 


1903 


13,475 


10,719 


10,056 


93.9 


3,428 


0.342 


1904 


13,804 


11,094 


10,422 


93.9 


3,887 


0.373 


1905 


14,296 


11,543 


10,897 


94.4 


3,746 


0.344 



210 



ANNUAL REPOKTS. 



TABLE 18 — MEMBERSHIP, ETC., OF HIGH SCHOOL 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 









Per cent, of 




Per cent, of 




Average 


Largest 


Average 


Number of 


Average 


Year. 


Membership 


Number in 


Membership 


Graduates of 


Membership 




all Schools. 


High School. 


of all 


High School. 


of all 








Schools. 




Schools. 


1867 


2,157 


119 


5.51 


7 


0.32 


1868 


2,285 


141 


6.17 


17 


0.75 


1869 


2,480 


158 


6.37 


25 


1.01 


1870 


2,639 


165 


6.25 


16 


0.65 


1871 


2,549 


161 


6.31 


33 


1.29 


1872 


2,799 


186 


6.64 


21 


0.75 


1873 


3,217 


190 


5.91 


28 


0.87 


1874 


3,265 


198 


6.06 


26 


0.79 


1875 


3,515 


213 


6.06 


31 


0.88 


1876 


3,712 


226 


6.09 


33 


0.81 


1877 


3,788 


227 


5.91 


37 


0.98 


1878 


3,992 


250 


6.26 


31 


0.78 


1879 


4,169 


246 


5.90 


34 


0.82 


1880 


4,278 


254 


5.93 


27 


0.63 


1881 


4,064 


256 


6.29 


34 


0.84 


1882 


4,263 


280 


6.57 


33 


0.77 


1883 


4,438 


278 


6.26 


43 


0.97 


1884 


4,804 


315 


6.55 


46 


0.96 


1885 


4,904 


385 


7.85 


46 


0.94 


1886 


4,985 


374 


6.70 


56 


L12 


1887 


5,198 


387 


7.44 


53 


1.02 


1888 


5,488 


435 


7.92 


60 


1.09 


1889 


5,956 


444 


7.45 


67 


1.12 


1890 


6,485 


487 


7.51 


60 


0.9a 


1891 


6,502 


535 


8.23 


68 


1.05 


1892 


7,035 


577 


8.20 


80 


1.14 


1893 


7,217 


626 


8.67 


82 


1.14 


1894 


7,274 


691 


9.50 


111 


1.52 


1895 


7,617 


775 


10.17 


92 


1.21 


1896 


8,077 


858 


10.62 


119 


1.47 


1897 


8,589 


885 


10.31 


121 


1.59 


1898 


9,085 


.890 


9.80 


130 


1.43 


1899 


9,502 


985 


10.70 


137 


1.49 


1900 


9,823 


1.031 


10.49 


131 


1.33 


1901 


9,991 


1,098 


10.99 


152 


1.52 


1902 


10,402 


1,138 


10.94 


164 


158 


1903 


10,719 


1,208 


11.27 


181 


1.70 


1904 


11,094 


1,286 


11.60 


179 


1.61 


1905 

*— 


11,543 


1,372 


11.89 


211 


1.83 



SCHOOL DEPAKTMENT. 



211 



TABLE 19. — PROnOTIONS FOR SCHOOL YEAR ENDING JUNE 

30, 1905. 













c 


,n <U 


Tl '^ 




o 

B 


ionally 
to Next 
e. 


H 

c 
o 


'V 




omotion 
een 
and Jun 


Droppe 
after 
ths' Tria 


Grade. 


1-5 


^"S 2 


-a 


'£ 


-o^ 


^t^ 


Ji^ o 




fl a 


o o^ 


,^_i 


a 


<U 4J 


^^ 0) rQ 






3 o 


o . 


m 


"^ c 


c«rQ C 




a 




B 
o 




o 


peci 
ptei 


i 1 




O 


a. 


Ph 


^ 


PL, 


^ c^ 


^ S 


I 


1,551 


1,166 


89 


288 


8 


1 


4 


II 


1,382 


1,110 


102 


160 


10 


4 


12 


III 


1,219 


992 


126 


101 




1 


16 


IV 


1,236 


975 


136 


125 




5 


12 


v 


1,166 


922 


143 


101 




5 


4 


VI 


1,059 


768 


156 


116 


19 


15 


11 


VII 


960 


741 


132 


85 


2 




20 


VIII 


785 


541 


147 


96 


1 


2 


12 


IX 


614 


511 


83 


20 




1 


3 


Total 


9,972 


7,726 


1,114 


1,092 


40 


34 


94 



Percentage of Promotions for School Year Ending June 30, 1905, 













a 


Ul U 


'o -d 




i 


>.■>< 


"rt 




rt 

JS 


O 3 


u re 


Grade. 


B 
o *z 


iditional 
ed to Ne 
rade. 


H 
3 

73 


'6 

c 
IS 


<u <u 
u T3 
O ei 

So 
-a 4j 


Promoti 
tween 
er and J 


;es Drop 
k after 
onths' T 




3 2 

c 

o 


5^o 

PL) 


o 
S 

c 

u 




CO 

o 

u 
PL, 


Special 

be 

Septemb 


Promot< 

bac 

Three M 


I 


100 


75.2 


5.7 


18.6 


0.5 


0.1 


4.5 


II 


100 


80.3 


7.4 


11.6 


0.7 


0.3 


11.8 


III 


100 


81.4 


10.3 


8.3 


.... 


0.1 


12.7 


IV 


100 


78.9 


11.0 


10.1 


.... 


0.5 


8.8 


V 


100 


79.1 


12.3 


8.6 


.... 


0.4 


2.8 


VI 


100 


72.5 


14.7 


11.0 


1.8 


1.4 


7.1 


VII 


100 


77.2 


13.7 


8.9 


0.2 


.... 


15.2 


VIII 


100 


68.9 


18.7 


12.3 


0.1 


0.3 


8.2 


IX 


100 


83.2 


1.3.5 


3.3 


.... 


0.2 


3.6 


Total 


100 


77.5 


11.2 


10.9 


0.4 


0.3 


8.4 



■212 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 20. — RESIGNATIONS OF TEACHERS. 



School. 


Teacher. 


Resignation 
Took Effect. 


In Service. 


Latin High . 


Edith M. Walker 


June 29 


2 years 


English High . 




Helen E. Harding 


(< 


4 


(< 


English High . 




H. Adelaide Hamlin 


Nov. 3 


1 


•' 2 mos. 


Prescott . . 




Catherine T. Brown 


Feb. 17 


36 


" 5 •• 


Hanscom 






Lina F. Bates 


June 29 


8 


(( 


Baxter . 






Ethelyn M. Burton 


11 


5 


<( 


Knapp . 






Abby C. Hunt 


(( 


31 


(( 


Knapp . 






Maude M. Mixer 


(< 


3 


(( 


Knapp . 






Mary E. Stearns 


(( 


6 


(( 


Perry . . 






Mrs. M. B. McKusick 


Jan. 27 


7 


ii ^ « 


Perry 






Erminnie A. French 


June 29 


7 


(( 


Perry . 






Grace B. Tibbetts 


Dec. 22 


15 


«* 4 « 


Pope . . 






Mildred A. Peck 


June 29 


4 


<< 


Pope 






Susan G. Meldrum 


« 


9 


(( 


Bell . . 






E. Laurette Schuch 


(( 


23 


(( 


Edgerly 






Mary E. Coyle 


« 


7 


<( 


Glines . 






Mary H. Brownrigg 


(( 


5 


« 


Glines . 




' 


Flora B. Rice 


« 


10 


« 


Forster . 






Grace M. Frederick 


Jan. 13 


1 


"4 " . 


Bingham 






Beatrice Kendall 


June 29 


5 


(( 


Carr 






Jane W. Hawkes 


Jan. 20 


6 months 


Morse . 






Pauline S. Downes 


June 29 


33 


years 


Brown . 






Mabel A. Sherman 


Dec. 22 


1 


" 4 mos. 


Hodgkins 






S. Elizabeth Hallowell 


Dec. 3 


4 


♦' 3 '* 


Hodgkins 






D. J. Titus 


June 29 


4 


(( 



I 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



213 



TABLE 21.— TEACHERS ELECTED IN 1905. 



School. 



Teacher. 



Latin High . . 


English High . 


Prescott . . . 


Baxter 






Knapp 






Knapp 






Knapp 






Knapp 






Knapp 






Pope . 






Pope . 






Bell . 






Bell . . 






Edgerly 






Glines 






Glines 






Forster 






Bingham . 






Morse . . 






Morse 






Durell . 






Burns . . 






Proctor . 






Highland 




Hodgkins . 




Hodgkins . 




Hodgkins . 




Lincoln . 







Maud M. Cunningham 
Ruth Tousey 
Louise Townsend 
Elsie G. Ashton 
Nina M. Doanan 
Elizabeth G. Diman 
Harriet C. Hamilton 
Daisy King 
Blanche L. Paine 
B. May Layman 
Lena F. Shaw 
Helen L. McGann 
Ada F. Smith 
G. Hortense Pentecost 
Mary A. Lawry 
Blanche S. Hall 
Gertrude M. Sias 
Bessie J. Baker 
Minnie A. Day 
Emma A. Gilman 
Ethel Worcester 
Emma B. Jones 
Inez Dill 
Aaron B. Palmer 
Beatrice A. Randall 
Etta M. Miller 
Genievc R. Barrows 
Annie H. Hall 



Coming From 



Began 
Service. 



Holyoke 

Somerville 

Maiden 

Somerville 

Somerville 

Dedham 

Somerville 

Everett 

Somerville 

Los Angeles 

Brockton 

Somerville 

Somerville 

Brockton 

Everett 

Brockton 

Boston 

Maiden 

Chelmsford 

Somerville 

Hingham 

Somerville 

Somerville 

Lynn 

Saugus 

Maiden 

Maiden 

Revere 



Sept. 6 



Salary. 





u 


900 


(( 


650 


Nov. 6 


500 


Sept., '04 


725 


Sept. 6 


700 






650 






650 






500 






650 






650 






525 






650 






650 






650 






650 


Jan. 16 


575 


Sept. 6 


650 


<( 


650 


« 


650 


« 


525 


« 


650 


K 


525 


^^ 


1,800 


Apr. 3 


650 


Dec. 4 


700 


(( 


650 


Jan. 


2, '06 


650 



ASSISTANTS APPOINTED, 1905 



Glines 
Hanscom 



Ida M. Kane 
Fannie Hayden 



TABLE 22.— LEAVE OF ABSENCE OF TEACHER5. 

Sept. 25. Nellie S. Dickey, for school year ending June 30, 1906. 
Sept. 25. Alice E. Jones, for school year ending June 30, 1906. 
Sept. 25. Jennie C. Frazier, for school year ending June 30, 1906. 



214 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 
TABLE 23.— TRANSFER OF TEACHERS. 



Teachers. 


From 


To 


Margaret D. Jack 


Burns 


Proctor 


Clara S. Hammond 












<( 


«i 


Nora F. Byard 












Durell 


(( 


Edith L. Hunnewell 












(( 


(( 


Ella P. McLeod . 












Carr 


(( 


Elizabeth T. Burrage 












Burns 


t( 


Aboie A. Gurney 












Knapp 


(( 


Elizabeth M. Collins 












Bell 


Hanscom 


Catherine E. Sweeney 












Baxter 


Perry 


Julia A. Mahoney 












Knapp 


Baxter 


Lucia Alger . 












t( 


Bell 


Abigail P. Hazelton . 












Morse 


Durell 



TABLE 24.— NUMBER OF TEACHERS 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 













Assistants 










High 


Grammar 


Primary 


Special 


not in 








Year. 


School. 


School. 


School. 


Teachers. 


charge of 
room. 


Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


1885 


9 


63 


48 


1 





10 


Ill 


121 


1886 


9 


62 


48 


1 





9 


111 


120 


1887 


10 


64 


48 


1 





9 


114 


123 


1888 


10 


m 


52 


4 


7 


9 


130 


139 


1889 


10 


60 


56 


4 


7 


10 


127 


137 


1890 


10 


78 


58 


5 


7 


12 


146 


158 


1891 


12 


86 


63 


5 


13 


12 


167 


179 


1892 


13 


90 


67 


5 


10 


12 


173 


185 


1893 


14 


88 


63 


5 


19 


12 


177 


189 


1894 


15 


91 


66 


6 


11 


12 


177 


189 


1895 . 


28 


91 


73 


5 


12 


19 


186 


209 


1896 


30 


102 


74 


6 


14 


22 


208 


230 


1897 


31 


109 


85* 


6 


18 


22 


227 


249 


1898 


32 


112 


87* 


7 


13 


23 


229 


252 


1899 


36 


119 


92* 


7 


9 


23 


240 


263 


1900 


40 


127 


96* 


7 


6 


24 


249 


273 


1901 


44t 


130 


94* 


7 


8 


26 


257 


283 


1902 


45t 


140 


91* 


7 


9 


26 


266 


292 


1903 


46t 


143 


96* 


7 


14 


25 


281 


306 


1904 


48t 


152 


98* 


7 


9 


27 


285 


312 


1905 


481 


153 


100* 


7 


7 


27 


288 


315 



*Including four kindergartners. 
t Including two secretaries. 
^Including one secretary. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 215 

TABLE 25.— BOOKS AUTHORIZED FOR USE, 1905* 

For Grammar and Primary Schools. 

Our Country's Story, Tappan Houghton, Mifflin, & Co. 

A History of Somerville, Mary A. Haley. 

A Historical Chart Atkinson, Mentzer, & Grover 

For High Schools. 

Melle's Contemporaneous French Writers. 

German Selections for Sight Translation, Mme. G. F. Mondan. 

Robinson der Jungere, Campe. 

Auf der Sonnenseite, Seidel and other writers. 

Eingeschneit, Emil Frommel. 

Der Schwiegersohn, Baumbach. 

The First Scientific French Reader, Bowen. 

A History Syllabus for Secondary Schools D. C. Heath & Co. 

Essentials of Business Law, Burdick D. Appleton & Co. 

TABLE 26.— GRADUATION EXERCISES, 1905. 
High Schools. 

The graduation exercises of the high schools occurred on 
Thursday, June 29, at the First Methodist Episcopal church, in 
the presence of a large audience of parents and friends. 

The formal address to graduates was given by the Rev. Wil- 
liam DeWitt Hyde, D. D., president of Bowdoin College. 

At the close of the address, the chairman of the committee, 
F. A. P. Fiske, presented diplomas to the 211 members of the 
graduating classes. 

Order of Exercises. 

Frederick A. P. Fiske, Chairman of School Board, presiding. 
tOverture. "lolanthe." Sullivan 

Hadley's Orchestra. 

1. t*Singing. 

Chorus and Celestial Soli, "Unfold, ye portals" ("Re- 
demption"). Gounod 
(With Orchestra and Organ.) 

2. Prayer. 

Rev. William H. Pierson. 

3. Cantata. 

"Morning." . Ries 

(With Soprani and Bassi Soli.) 

Part I., "Representation of Twilight." 

Orchestra. 
Part n., "Morning." 
Soprani: Misses Alice C. Pilsbury, Hazel C. Trueman, Ethel W. 
Brown, English; Marion F. Bunker, Mary T. McCarthy, 
Edith M. Marshall, Latin. 
Bassi: Messrs. Walter F. Burt, Paul E. Alger, Ernest R. Moore, 
Latin; Frank R. Bradford, Maurice L. Blair, George H. 
Lament, English. 



216 



ANNUAL KEPOETS. 



4. Address to Graduates. 

"The Education of Life." 
Rev. William DeWitt Hyde, D. D., President of Bowdoin College. 

5. Semi-Chorus (Girls' Voices). 

"Spinning Song" ("Flying Dutchman"). Wagner 

6. Presentation of Diplomas. 

Frederick A. P. Fiske, Chairman of School Board. 

7. tSinging. 

Unison Solo, "The Holy City." Adams 

* All singing accompanied by Hadley's Orchestra, under the direction of S. Henry 
Hadley, teacher of music in the schools. 
t Orchestration by S. Henry Hadley. 






Latin High School Graduates. 



■ <Ellen Abigail Baker. 
"Geftrude Emeline Baxter. 
•Marion Frances Bunker. 
^Ruth Gertrude Butters. 
Alice Meserve Chadwick. 
Ethel May Cole. 
Emma Edna Davis. 
Ruth Richardson Dodge. 
Cecilia Iva Doe. 
Alice- Frances Elliott. 
Fannie Baden Freeman. 
Florence Crowell Gardner. 
Mary Rose Griffin. 
Avis. Corinne Hall. 
Fidela Eastamen Holm. 
Nellies Lodema Kimball. 
Eleanor Louise Kittredge. 
Florence Louise Leonard. 
MaAid Myrtle Lunt. 
Edith Marion Marshall. 
Majy Theresa McCarthy. 
AnnJe Rebecca McCoy. 
Eleanor Gertrude McMenimen. 
Alice Gertrude Merrill. 
Anna Myrtle Merrill. 
Ethel Louise Mulliken. 
Edith Frances Munroe. 
Clyde Chandler Newell. 
Josephine Agatha O'Riley. 
Carra ,Eliza Patten. 
Harriet Everett Robinson. 
Florence Jane Saunders. 
Bertha Dot Sias. 
Constance Tead. 
Maria Louise Thiery. 
Ruth Lillian Whitman. 

John Henry Adcock. 
Paul Edgar Alger. 



Alexander Watt Blyth. 
Robert Arthur Burns. 
Harry- Eugene Burroughs. 
Walter Frederick Burt. 
Irving Page Colman. 
Ernest Llewellyn Cooper. 
Arthur Saltmarsh Dockham. 
Arthur Franklin Doe. 
Thomas Perkins Durell. 
John Edmund Dwyer. 
Allen Edrick Elliott. 
Lester Fisher Ellis. 
Edward Francis FitzGerald. 
John Milligan Groves. 
Leo Edgar Hafifofd. 
Andrew Anthony Hagen, Jr. 
Fred Lemuel Ham. 
George Warren Hinckley. 
William Ellsworth Hooper. 
Herbert Handy Howard. 
John William Mahoney. 
Ray Thomas McDonald. 
Francis Varnum Mead. 
Irving Woodbury Merrill. 
Ernest Raymond Moore. 
James Leo Murphy. 
Albert Cline Perkiils. 
Ezekiel Pratt. 
Leon Foster Scoboria. 
Edgar Floyd Sefwall. 
Harold Harris Sharp. 
Ivan Gerald SmitM. 
Edward Paul Souther. 
Albert Chase Spaldifig. 
Ernest Frederick Ver Wiebe. 
Frederick Percy Whitney. 
Joseph Matthew Wright. 
George Monroe York. 



i 



i 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



217 



English High School Graduates. 



Nora Veronica Ahearn. 
Mildred Eva Allen. 
Ruth Viola Allen. 
Gertrude May Armstrong. 
Edith Pauline Baron. 
Mary Elizabeth Black. 
Ada Grace Bliss. 
Clara Louise Boyle. 
Ethel Walcott Brown. 
Margaret Burns. 
Estelle Gertrude Campbell. 
Camilla Ellsworth Chipman. 
Ruth Tower Clarridge. 
Elva Douglas Cox. 
Alice May Cullin. 
Josepliine Bartlett Curtis. 
Blanche Barbara Dadmun. 
Ethel 'Lewis Davenport. 
Lillian Rachel Davis. 
Annie-May Dodge. 
Anna Nelson Emerson. 
Laura 'Bernadette Farrell. 
Leona Emmeline Forsythe. 
Lillian Caroline Franke. 
Sara Ida Gale. 
Ethel May Glines. 
Edna Florence Gordon. 
Edna Mildred Hanscom. 
Isabels Frances Hardy. 
Elizabeth Harrington. 
Eva May Hatchett. 
Florence Inez Hill. 
Clara Sylvia Hyde. 
Frances 'Priscilla Johnson. 
Helen J6sephine Koen. 
Mary Charlotte Lamb. 
Anna Gertrude Lomasney. 
Ruby Jafie Loveless. 
Mary Ellen Lynch. 
Cora Em'ma Mace. 
Avis Eleanor Maischein. 
Esther Frances Martin. 
Elsie Maud Matthews. 
Esther Agatha Meehan. 
Martha Aldana Mess. 
Ernestine Anna Miille. 
Winifred Claire Millner. 
Josephine Gertrude Nicholson. 
Junie May Partridge. 
Margaret Louise Patterson. 
Mabel Carrie. Peterson. 
Alice Christmas Pilsbury. 
Marion Fuller Prichard. 
Catherine Elizabeth Pynn. 
Marie Belle Ransom. 
Florence May Reed. 
Georgie Etta-Robbins. 
Grace Tirzah Robbins. 
Ellen Mary Rose.. 
Grace Reerina Russell. 



Mary Ella Sargent. 
Vera Lee 'Sawyer. 
Katherin^ Elizabeth Schwab. 
Florence -Ella Shaw. 
Florence May Shaw. 
Auwelda 'Huntress Smith. 
Ethel May Spofford. 
Bernice Farnham Sprague. 
Nettie Stanley. 
Jennie Greenwood Stevens. 
Minerva Isabelle Story. 
Edwina Martha Sutton. 
Mary BeWe Thomson. 
Hazel Carlisle Trueman. 
Muriel Bliss Trueman. 
Eleanor Louise Turner. 
Agnes Ev6lyn Urquhart. 
Hilda Flor-ence Veinot. 
Annie Ray Walford. 
Ninon Idelle Williams. 

'Oscar Freeman Abbott? 
James Baldwin. 
fSamuel Stanwood Barker. 
'Scott William Berton. 
'Manuel Anthony Bettincourt, Jr. 
Maurice Linwood Blair. 
Erank Rumrill Bradford. 
Orin Wright Bradshaw. 
Herbert Gardner Brown. 
Ignatius Leo Bryan. 
Michael Joseph Burke. 
Charles Emery Chase. 
Thomas Charles Commins. 
Frederick William Cook. 
Joseph Ihomas Cotter. 
William Lynch Curran. 
Harold Richards Currier. 
Raymond Ellis Gushing. 
Chester Bonner Davis. 
Chester Laurens Dawes. 
Manuel Joseph DeAvellar, Jr. 
Frederick DeCaro. 
Richard Westacott Deshon. 
Arthur Warren Drake. 
Walter Jeremiah Driscoll. 
Harry Lucius Dunbar. 
Harold Francis Foster. 
Arthur Herbert George. 
Ira Glassman. 
Ralph Brigham Guerke. 
Philip Spooner Harris. 
Alexander Higgens. 
Harrison Parker Higgins. 
Robert Tilden Hines. 
George Henry Kieley. 
Eric Axel Kindlund. 
George Hazen Lamont. 
Leonard Walter Libbey. 
Clarence Dickinson Maynard. 



218 



ANNUAL KEPORTS. 



George Walter Nary. 
James Wesley Nichols. 
Aaron Bnrnham Noyes. 
Charles Armington Parks. 
Thomas Owens Scottron. 
Winthrop Sears. 
Walter McCabe Smith. 
Albert Stephen Snow. 



Gardner Wesley Stacey. 
Walter Albert 'Tolman. 
George Francis Trenholm. 
Lauren Wells Waldron. 
Ernest Alonzo Ware. 
Joseph Wood Whitaker. 
Leslie Sherwood Wiggin. 
George Henry Wilson. 



TABLE 27.-GRAMMAR SCHOOL GRADUATES. 

The lack of a hall large enough to accommodate all the 
grammar scliool graduates and their friends compelled us to de- 
vote two evenings to the graduation exercises. Accordingly, 
Tuesday evening, June 27, and Wednesday evening, June 28*, 
were set apart for the purpose. 

The following was the order of exercises on Tuesday 
evening : — 



Order of Exercises. 

Frederick A. P. Fiske, Chairman of School Board, presiding. 
1. Overture. 



"Martha." 
2. Prayer. 
3 
4 



Hadley's Orchestra. 
Rev. D. B. McLeod. 



Flotow 



H. K. Hadley 



Gounod 



*Singing. 

Four-part Madrigal, "Song of the Skylark." 
Address. 

"Wise and Otherwise." 

Professor Edward Cummings, of Cambridge. 

5. Singing. 

Soli and Chorus (Noel), "O sing to God." 
(With Orchestra and Organ.) 

6. Address to Graduates and Presentation of Diplomas to Gradu- 

ates of Prescott, Pope, Bell, and Edgerly Schools. 
George E. Whitaker, Member of School Board, Ward Three. 

7. tSinging. 

Two-part Song (Girls' Voices), "Drift, my bark." Kucken 

8. Presentation of Diplomas to Graduates of Glines, Forster, and 

Bingham Schools. 

Mr. Whitaker. 

9. tSinging. 

Vocal March, "Football Day." Veazie 



* All singing accompanied by Hadley's Orchestra, under the direction of S.Henry 
Hadley, teacher of music in the schools, 
t Orchestration by S. Henry Hadley. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



219 



Names of Graduates. 



PRESCOTT SCHOOL. 



Charles H. Austin, Jr. 
Marion L. Bolton. 
Eleanor G. Bradt. 
Frances W. Cahill. 
Frank L. Clain. 
Lewis F. Dresser. 
Frederick J. Ellis. 
Mary E. Faulkner. 
Grace H. Fernald. 
Hattie C. Foss. 
Grace S. Halfrey. 
Edna D. Hammond. 
Arthur C. Haskell. 
Irma Haynes. 
Charles T. Hughes. 
Lillian M. Hughes. 
Elizabeth A. R. Leary. 
Paul Littlefield. 
Thomas Leo Maguire. 
James L. Muldoon. 



Miles J. Muldoon. 
Catherine A. Mullen. 
Lewis Pierce. 
Luella F. Roberts. 
Cora I. M. Spieler. 
Edgar L. Staudinger. 
Harold A. Tarbox. 
Mildred H. Taylor. 
Mildred L. Taylor. 
William C. Thomann. 
Dwight N. Thompson. 
Herbert W. Tolman. 
Frederick H. True. 
B. Gladys Tuttle. 
James PI. Walker. 
Ella A. Walton. 
Beatrice F. Waugh. 
Frank M. Welch. 
Mabel W. Wilber. 
Alma G. Wiley. 



POPE SCHOOL. 



John L. Ahearn. 
Eugene Lawrence Brine. 
Loretto Brine. 
Annie J. Burns. 
Anna V. Byrnes. 
Harry M. Cain. 
Ernest W. Chapin. 
Marion Corliss. 
Edmund P. Crocker. 
Alice Louise Delaney. 
Alonzo M. Everett. 
Guy LeRoy Everett. 
Elizabeth C. Farrell. 
Mary Louise Farrell. 
Harris Howard Freeman. 
Annie Clare Gavin. 
Clara Alice Goudey. 
Lester Carlisle Gustin. 
Sophia Josephine Hanley. 
Mabel M. Hopkins. 
Isabella Hunter. 



Dorothy Morgan Joyce. 
Alice M. Kane. 
Olive A. L. Lemery. 
Franklin R. Lovering. 
Etta H. MacKenna. 
Ruth S. Manning. 
Hattie Louise Milligan. 
Mary J. Milligan. 
Albert E. Nurse. 
Gertrude Beatrice Nurse. 
Julia O'Callahan. 
Louise Pauline Rupprecht. 
Margaret M. Ryan. 
William Francis Scannell. 
Maude Ethel Thomas. 
Warner Thorndike. 
Fred M. Trask. 
Louise Cavine Watt. 
Marian R. Whitaker. 
Elizabeth White. 
Frederick Cooper Williams. 



BELL SCHOOL. 



George R. Allan. 
Ralph W. Atwater. 
Richard W. Bennett. 
Bertha M. Boyd. 
Mabel M. Busteed. 
Arthur L. Cavanagh. 
Alice M. Chamberlin. 
Bertha L. Chapman. 
Elsie M. Clark. 
J. Gerard Clarke. 



Helen M. Etheridge. 
Louise C. FitzGerald. 
Jean E. Follett. 
Agnes S. Fyfe. 
Alfred L. Higgins. 
Dorothy S. Plopkins. 
W. Stuart Howe. 
Marie L. Hurley. 
Adelbert L. Jones. 
Walter L. Jones. 



220 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



Howard A. MacLean. 
E. Hazel Macy. 
Henry A. Miner. 
Gertrude S. Mitchell. 
Perkins Morrison. 
Edna M. Morse. 
Guy E. Morse. 
Bertha G. Mugford. 
T. Francis Muldoon. 
Burr O. Nichols. 



Chester A. Perry. 
Helen M. Russell. 
M. Esther Shapleigh. 
Maude Skinner. 
Harvey E. Snow. 
George G. Swanson. 
Sophie E. Tworoger. 
Richard W. Walsh. 
Rachel G. Whitcomb. 
Edith L. Whitnev. 



EDGERLY SCHOOL. 



M. Anna Ayres. 
Harriet J. Babson. 
Bertha B. Bemis. 
Lester R. Brundage. 
Vernal L. Chapman. 
Elsie P. Clifford. 
Margaret L. Corkhill. 
Robert W. Crocker. 
John C. Driscoll. 
Maybelle M. Durkee. 
Florida Esdale. 
Florence A. Gale. 
Ethel E. Gove. 
Fred C. Gunter. 
Ernest W. Hale. 
Harold E. Hallett. 
Dana E. Harding. 
Nettie Hillson. 
Bessie C. Horton. 
Caroline L. Hunt. 
Carl W. Johnson. 
Mary A. Jolly. 
Percy E. Kirkpatrick. 
Carrie R. Knowles. 



Alton A. Linnell. 
Harry H. Lougee. 
Percival A. Mellett. 
Nathaniel McD. Mitchell. 
Anna Modest. 
William H. Moore. 
Lillian B. Nute. 
A. Pearl Patterson. 
Alvar M. Pinto. 
Gladys M. Pond. 
Edith S. Potter. 
William R. Rankin. 
Charlotte S. Rennie. 
Charlotte C. Riley. 
Esther M. Shay. 
Zertelle M. Steele. 
Walter L Stockdon. 
G. Everett Storey. 
A. May Struble. 
Bessie J. Taylor. 
Marion F. Towne. 
Gertrude M. Trickey. 
Josephine Wentworth. 



GLINES SCHOOL. 



Frances H. Barnet. 
Ethel M. Beal. 
Jessie E. Bliss. 
Anna L. Bryne. 
John F. Collins. 
Elsie M. Craft. 
Philip J. Doherty. 
Samuel Donnelly, Jr. 
Pauline L. Dooley. 
Gustavus E. Foster. 
Fred J. Hislop. 
Herbert W. Howard. 
Mildred K. Hurlbert. 
Herbert P. Jarvis. 
Mabel F. Kenneson. 
Leslie S. Kinsman. 
Harold B. Lopaus. 
Mary A. C. Mclntire. 



Grace E. Mcintosh. 
George J. McKinley. 
Mary C. A. Massari. 
Lena R. Moore. 
Mildred Onley. 
James C. Palmer. 
Charles S. Paon. 
Roswell D. Penney. 
Arthur C. W. Peterson; 
Florence W. Rice. 
Pearl V. Rideout. 
Harold L. Smart. 
Helen B. Smart. 
John S. Smith. 
Albert W. Stronach. 
Fred L Wass. 
Julian E. Wass. 
Grace M. Webster. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



221 



FORSTER SCHOOL. 



Isa S. Achorn. 
Nina R. Achorn. 
Ruth E. Andrews. 
Arthur L. Baker. 
Amy Barker. 
Margueritte E. Borns. 
Winfield S. Burbank. 
Sadie E. Cameron. 
J. Gerard Campbell. 
Mary L. Cheney. 
L. Elizabeth Chickering. 
Gertrude G. Clough. 
Portia E. Clough. 
Ernestine Z. Cohen. 
Roger A. Colman. 
Hazel M. Gushing. 
Alice C. Duncan. 
Marion L. Duncan. 
Mabel E. Edwards. 
Nectar M. Eksergian. 
Marion L. Emerson. 
May E. Fitzgerald. 
Helen C. French. 
Ruth E. Gillard. 
Herbert P. Googins. 



Joseph H. Gridley. 
James Griffiths. 
Lester B. Hallett. 
Elizabeth A. Hardy. 
Harry C. Harris. 
Mildred L. Hatch. 
Kathleen W. Hemeon. 
G. Sidney Holland. 
Edith E. Joiner. 
Mildred L. Joiner. 
Irene Kibbe. 
Florella L. Kidder. 
Lillie E. King. 
Eudora D. Leitch. 
F. Chrystal B. Lowe. 
Herbert A. Macdonald. 
Edith F. Moore. 
Alice M. Morey. ^ 
Herbert L. Morrison. 
Allison L. H. Newton. 
Charlotte E. O'Brien. 
Isabella G. Owler. 
L. Wright Parker. 
Clinton A. Patterson. 
Beatrice J. Pearson. 



BINGHAM SCHOOL. 



John S. Bielis. 
Marie D. Brisson. 
Rose A. Burke. 
John F. Cudmore. 
Edward A. Donahue. 
Mary E. Ducey. 
Lucy M. Farnam. 
Margaret G. Gannon. 
Grace H. Gero. 
J. Arthur Goguen. 
Mary E. Goguen. 
Ida M. Gorfine. 
Hannah M. Greaves. 
Grace V. Griffiths. 
John E. Gurvin. 
Mary T. McAleer. 



J. Elsie Macdonald. 
W. Edv/ard McFarland. 
Mabel J. McGoldrick. 
Annie J. McGovern. 
Florence L. McKenna. 
Francis H. Nixon. 
Dudley R. Nowlin. 
Ellen K. O'Brien. 
Albert J. O'Neil. 
Margaret M. Rogan. 
Georgiana Sands. 
Charles M. Sisk. 
Frank A. Stacy. 
Gertrude Wheeler. 
Mary A. Wilson. 



The following was the order of exercises for Wednesday 
evening : — 



Order of Exercises. 

Frederick A. P. Fiske, Chairman of School Board, presiding. 

1. Overture. 

"Martha." Flotow 

Hadley's Orchestra. 

2. Prayer. 

Rev. Edward E. Braithwalte. 

3. *Singing. 

Four-part Madrigal, "Song of the Skylark." H. K. Hadley 



222 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



Gounod- 



4. Address. 

''Significance of a Day." 

Hon. George A. Littlefield, of Providence, R. I. 

5. Singing. 

Soli and Chorus (Noel), "O sing to God." 
(With Orchestra and Organ.) 

6. Address to Graduates and Presentation of Diplomas to Gradu- 

ates of the Knapp, Carr, and Morse Schools. 
George C. Mahoney, Member of School Board, Ward Seven. 

7. tSinging. 

Two-part Song (Girls' Voices), "Drift, my bark." Kucketi 

8. Presentation of Diplomas to Graduates of the Highland and 

Hodgkins Schools. 

Dr. Mahoney. 

9. tSinging. 

Vocal March, "Football Day." Veazie 



* All singing accompanied by HacUey's Orchestra, under the direction of S.Henry 
Hadley, teacher of music in schools, 
t Orchestration by S. Henry Hadley. 



Names of Graduates. 



OREN S. KNAPP SCHOOL. 



Flora G. Alexander. 
Dominic A. Bettincourt. 
Claire A. Billings. 
Theresa F. Boehlman. 
Hazel G. Burke. 
Henry J. Cabeceiras. 
Ephraim Campbell. 
Walter H. Chambers. 
Elizabeth F. Coogan. 
Louise C. Coogan. 
Gundhild H. Dahlgren. 
Martha W. Delay. 
James J. Dolan. 
Frances M. Donovan. 
Adelina C. Doucet. 
Joseph A. Finnegan. 
Elizabeth R. Given. 
J. Francis Grady. 
Mary E. Hanson. 
Alice T. Harrington. 
Margaret R. Healy. 
Mary G. Healy. 
George Henderson. 
Alice M. Hill. 



Elizabeth M. Holt. 
Mary G. Howard. 
Esther M. Jennings. 
Gladys E. Knowlton. 
Pauline Leach. 
Susie L. Leest. 
Ursula M. Lutz. 
Margaret L. McCarthy. 
Grace E. Madden. 
M. Delia Marchant. 
Mildred E. Morrison. 
Coralie A. Nash. 
Albert B. Schalk. 
George V. Sheridan. 
Florence A. Southward. 
Guy L. Stevens. 
Bertha R. Stevenson. 
Walter J. Sullivan. 
Teresa F. Sweeney. 
Arthur B. Szidat. 
James E. Trahey. 
Elmer Twitchell. 
May S. Wanzer. 



CARR SCHOOL. 



Ada L. Belt. 
Roland W. Bezanson. 
Agnes C. Breen. 
Nathan J. Brown. 
William J. Brown. 
Helen Caless. 



Henry R. Cheetham. 
Thomas J. Connors. 
Clyda A. Corwin. 
Joseph B. Cunningham. 
Willard H. Davis. 
Vernona W. DeCort. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



90 



Joseph Dente. 
Fred N. Dunning. 
Mary Enos. 
Dorothy D. Fales. 
William C. Farrell. 
James A. Harper. 
Marian L. Hallett. 
Mildred M. Haug. 
Edna L. Higgins. 
Charles E. Holmes. 
Carl N. Hudson. 
Elmer A. Johnson. 
Ethel M. Jones. 
Hugh T. Jones. 
Ruth E. Kingman. 
R. Sylvanus Kneeland. 
Sigrid W. Larson. 
Lillian L. Lunt. 
Mary F. McAllister. 
Jeremiah F. McCarthy. 
Bernard A. Macintosh. 
Jennie L. Mclntyre. 
John B. McTwiggan. 



Elizabeth Mitchell. 
Frances T. Moran. 
Mildred Moses. 
John J. Murphy. 
Frank J. O'Toole. 
Elizabeth L. O'Connell. 
Randolph D. Petrie. 
Charlotte A. Potter. 
Anna H. Reed. 
Mabelle M. Reed. 
Annie F. Reid. 
Hurdis W. Reid. 
Thomas J. Rice. 
Walter A. Rockwood. 
Angie M. Rose. 
Arthur L. Smith. 
Mary vSmith. 
Helen Spear. 
Emma M. Thiesfeldt. 
Florence M. Thompson. 
Frank E. Van Ummersen. 
Daisy L. Wells. 
Louise A. Whelan. 



MORSE SCHOOL. 



Caroline G. Allan. 
Mildred E. Arnold. 
William E. Bagster. 
Russell E. Bowers. 
Yetta F. C. Brown. 
Beatrice L Brownville. 
Alger T. Bunten. 
Albert S. Cann. 
Beatrice M. Clark. 
Harold C. Conner. 
Irving D. Dawes. 
Ruth G. Dawes. 
Edwin W. Garland. 
Eraser F. Grant. 
Evanell Haines. 
Leslie K. Harlow. 
Edwin D. Harrington. 
James J. Harrington. 
Raymond F. Henderson. 
Francis C. Hogan. 
Alvan W. Howard. 
Carl F. Jones. 



Margaret M. Mclntire. 
Sadie W. McKellar. 
Fred Miller. 
Herman Miille. 
Joseph J. Nangle. 
Walter H. Nolan. 
Marguerite D. Osborn. 
Dora C. Pedersen. 
Jennie M. Pedersen. 
Grace F. Perron. 
Laura F. Raymond. 
William T. Reynolds. 
Emil M. Robertson. 
Clayton V. Sawyer. 
Em.ma M. Sherman. 
Vera H. Sherwood. 
Burton E. Thompson. 
Raymond E. Toomey. 
Elizabeth Trustenitzer. 
Lucv A. Vears. 
Ethel M. Waugh. 
Helen Worcester. 



HIGHLAND SCHOOL. 



Jessie A. Ackert. 
Jennie H. Adler. 
Elliott C. Anderson. 
Gerald W. Banfil. 
Ida Barnett. 
Herman C. Benner. 
Winifred H. Bent. 
Mildred Benthall. 
Ethel M. Bird. 



Jennie B. Birney. 
Ida L. Boak. 
Beatrice L. Bowditch. 
Mary E. Clark. 
Helen G. Collins. 
Chester S. Cook. 
George E. Dodge. 
Senekerim M. Dohanian. 
Samuel Epstein. 



224 



ANNUAL REPOKTS, 



Fred W. Flint. 
Barbara D. Gardner. 
Albert E. S. Gillis. 
J. Arthur Gillooly, Jr. 
Raleigh I. Glynn. 
William B. Goodwin. 
Marguerite C. Gould. 
Gertrude A. Graves. 
Rose Greenberg. 
Edwin F. Greene. 
Otis L. Handley. 
Beatrice M. Harris. 
C. George Hayes. 
Dorothy F. Hayward. 
Harold P. Hayward. 
Burt A. Hazeltine. 
Ethel D. Hetherington. 
Oscar L. Honnors. 
Bernard A. Howe. 
Daniel Hurley. 
Margaret J. Hurley. 
Maurice E. Hurley. 
Mabel A. Jones. 
Alfred F. Kendall. 
Ralph W. Kenison. 
E. Myrtle Kingston. 
Lillian K. Lamb. 
Hilda M. Linfield. 
Alice K. Lloyd. 
Esther L. Love joy. 
Katharine B. MacKinnon. 
Walter Mahany, 
Harold H. Marden. 
Ralph E. Merry. 



J. Clayton Milliken. 
Mary W. D. Mitchell. 
C. Ross Morash. 
Robert C. Moulton. 
Carrie A. Mulock. 
A. Carrie Nelson. 
John F. Newcombe. 
Marion Nicholson. 
Rose M. Niles. 
Walter R. Patterson. 
Roland F. Pease. 
Marguerite D. Pendleton. 
E. Lois Reardon. 
Ida M. Reick. 
Harry C. Robbins. 
Josephine M. Sander. 
Catharine Scammell. 
Ethel B. Schurman. 
Arthur J. Sewall. 
Frank E. Shedd. 
Ellen A. Smallwood. 
Carleton W. Smith. 
Enid E. Steeves. 
Edward Stephens. 
Arthur P. Strout. 
Lillian B. Treadwell. 
E. Carrie Velio. 
Ernest M. Vose. 
Eleanor E. Waldron. 
Emily H. Wilder. 
Ruth A. Wood. 
Frances A. Yirovec. 
Jessie S. Young. 



HODGKINS SCHOOL. 



George M. Backus. 
Edith L Barstow. 
Ralph W. Bennett. 
Blanche M. Benson. 
Lena V. Bertwell. 
Frank N. Blanchard. 
Florence L. Briggs. 
Altha L. Cheney. 
Elizabeth A. Chipman. 
Alice L. Crane. 
Florence V. Dennis. 
Grace I. Dick. 
Ethel S. Drinkwater. 
Herman E. Duhn. 
Minnie A. Duhn. 
Eleanor Dunning. 
Josephine F. Dwyer. 
Archibald Flagg- 
Jeanie S. Fleming. 
Margaret M. Fogarty. 
Rufus W. Foster. 
Gertrude H. Goodwin. 
Ethel C. Haradon. 
Helen A. Harmon. 



Carl L. Hartshorn. 
Fred A. Hoyt, Jr. 
Elizabeth M. Jackson. 
John W. Geddes. 
Edith R. Jones. 
Willard L. Jones. 
Gertrude M. Kelly. 
Jennie C. Kristensen. 
Paul E. Laurent. 
Marion H. Locke. 
Charles B. Mackay. 
Marion C. Mackay. 
Marion E. Mead. 
Daniel C. Merrill. 
William J. Miller. 
Carl W. Morley. 
James F. Mulloney. 
Cleora A. Nickles. 
Edith M. Northrop. 
Blanche A. Ogier. 
Robert S. Paine, Jr. 
Amos G. Patch. 
Helen M. Phinney. 
Bertha M. Rogers. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 225 

Delia p. Rogers. Edna F. Teele. 

Hannah Romanow. Leon A. Waltz. 

Cyrus J. Russell. Ernest J. Wallstrom. 

Marion H. Sargent. Deborah Waranow. 

Lillian A. Short. Harold E. Weldon. 

Aphia C. Smith. Lorene A. Whitney. 
Lillian L. Smith. 



226 



ANNUAL EEPOKTS. 



TABLE 28.— ORGANIZATION OF SCHOOL BOARD, 1906. 



School Committee. 



Frederick A. P. Fiske, 
George E. Whitaker, 



Chairman 
Vice-Chairman 



MEMBERS. 

EX-OFFICIIS 



Charles A. Grimmons, Mayor, 72 Thurston street. 

Sidney B. Keene, Pres. Board of Aldermen, 56 Fellsway West. 



William W. Kennard, 
Dr. Henry F. Curtis, 



John H. O'Neil, 
Daniel H. Bradley, 



Wilbur S. Clarke, 
George E. Whitaker, 



WARD ONE. 

15 Hathorn street. 
145 Perkins street. 

WARD TWO. 

44 Oak street. 

19 Concord avenue. 

WARD THREE. 

40 Vinal avenue. 
75 Walnut street. 



WARD FOUR. 



William P. Jones, 

Charles A. Kirkpatrick, Jr., 



13-A Maple avenue. 
27 Sewall street. 



J. Walter Sanborn, 
Henry H. Folsom, 



Charles H. Hood, 
Frederick A. P. Fiske, 



WARD five. 

183 Central street. 
29 Albion street. 

WARD SIX. 

2 Benton road. 
44 Cherry street. 



WARD SEVEN. 

Mrs. Henrietta B. H. Attwood, 18 Herbert street. 
Dr. George C. Mahoney, 97 College avenue. 



Term expires 
January. 

1907 
1907 



1907 
1908 



1907 
1908 



1907 
1908 



1907 
1908 



1907 
1908 



1907 
1908 



1907 
1908 



Superintendent of Schools. 

Gordon A. Southworth. 

Office: City Hall Annex, Highland avenue. 

Residence: 40 Greenville street. 

The Superintendent's office will be open on school days from 8 to 12, 
and from 1.30 to 5; Saturdays, 8 to 10. His office hours are from 4 to 5 
on school days, and 8 to 9 on Saturdays. 

Office telephone, 814; house telephone, 12. 

Cora S. Fitch, Superintendent's clerk, 82 Munroe street. 



Board Meetings. 

January 29. April 30. September 24. 

February 26. May 28. October 29. 

March 26. June 25. November 26. 

8.15 o'clock. 



December 21. 
December 28. 



SCHOOL DEPAKTMENT. 227 

TABLE 28.— ORGANIZATION OF SCHOOL BOARD, 1906— Concluded. 



Standing Committees. 

High Schools.— Sanborn, Mahoney, Curtis, O'Neil, Clarke, Kirkpatrick, 
Fiske. 

District I. — Kennard, Curtis, Jones. 

PRESCOTT, HANSCOM, DAVIS, BENNETT. 

District II.— O'Neil, Bradley, Clarke. 

KNAPP, PERRY, BAXTER. 

District III. — Clarke, Whitaker, Bradley. 

POPE, BELL, CUMMINGS. 

District IV. — ^Jones, Xirkpatrick, Grimmons. 

EDGERLY, GLINES. 

District V. — Sanborn, Folsom, Keene. 

FORSTER, BINGHAM. 

District VI. — Hood, Fiske, Folsom. 

CARR, MORSE, PROCTOR, DURELL, BURNS, BROWN. 

District VII.— Mrs. Attwood, Mahoney, Hood. 

HIGHLAND, HODGKINS, LINCOLN, LOWE. 

Additional School Accommodations. — Hood, Sanborn, Curtis, Bradley, 
Whitaker, Jones, Mahoney, Grimmons, Keene. 

Evening Schools. — Whitaker, Fiske, Folsom. 

Finance. — Bradley, Kennard, Jones, Grimmons, Keene. 

Industrial Education. — Curtis, Mrs. Attwood, Clarke. 

Music. — Mrs. Attwood, Hood, O'Neil. 

Private Schools. — Kirkpatrick, O'Neil, Mahoney. 

Repairs of School Buildings. — Mahoney, Kennard, Folsom. 

Rules and Regulations. — O'Neil, Hood, Fiske. 

Salaries. — Fiske, Sanborn, Whitaker. 

Supplies. — Clarke, Bradley, Sanborn. 

Text-Books and Courses of Study. — Jones, Whitaker, Kennard, Bradley, 
Folsom, Hood, Mrs. Attwood. 

Vacation Schools. — Kennard, Jones, Kirkpatrick. 

Note. — The member first named is chairman. 



-228 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 29 TEACHERS IN SERVICE JANUARY, 1906. 



Name. 



LATIN HIGH SCHOOL. 

George L. Baxter, Head Master, 

Frank M, Hawes, Master, 

Charles T. Murray, Sub-Master, 

George M. Hosmer, Sub-Master, 

Frederick C. Hosmer, 

Sarah W. Fox, 

Frances W. Kaan, 

Eudora Morey, 

Mrs. Lena Gilbert, 

Grace T. Pratt, 

Mabel G. Curtis, 

Miriam Thayer, 

Maud M. Cunningham, 

ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL. 

Charles T. C. Whitcomb, Head Master, 

John A. Avery, Master, 

Everett W. Tuttle, Sub-Master, 

Harry L. Jones, 

Howard W. Poor, 

George W. Earle, 

Harry F. Sears, 

Charles F. Abbott, 

Frederick O. Smith, 

John M. Jaynes, 

A. Marion Merrill, 

A. Laura Batt, 

Lucy Ingram, 

Caroline A. Marsh, 

Eda L. Nichols, 

M. Helen Teele, 

Clara A. Johnson, 

Mary F. Carrick, 

(Bertha P. Marvel, 

Hila Helen Small, 

Harriet E. Tuell, 

Helen L. Follansbee, 

Bessie D. Davis, 

Ella D. Gray, 

Elizabeth Campbell, 

Nina A. Cummings, 

Kellie H. Swift, 

Jessamine D. Wolcott, 

Ruth Tousey, 

Anna Pushee, 

Bessie L. Forbes, 

Bertha A. Raymond, 

Blanche S. Bradford, 

Amy L. Cole, Sec'y and Lib., 



Residence. 



27 Warren ave. 
257 School St. 

28 Franklin st. 
13 Arlington st. 
13 Arlington st. 
46 Laurel st. 
133 Central st. 

26 Batavia st., Boston. 
51 Elmwood st. 
62 Waverly St., Roxbury. 
829 Boylston St., Boston. 
23 Hampshire St., Everett. 
53 Richdale ave. 



44 Walnut st. 

22 Dartmouth st. 

62 Highland ave. 

157 Highland ave. 

27 Mt. Vernon st., Reading. 

9 Pleasant ave. 

44 Orris St., Melrose Highlands. 

49 Boston st. 

135 Powder House boulevard. 

29 Putnam st. 
64 Vinal ave. 
64 Vinal ave. 
19 Aldersey st. 
22 Aldersey st. 

59 Church st., Watertown. 
11 Jason St., Arlington, 
177 Central st. 
271 Medford st. 
19 Highland ave. 
232 Highland ave. 

10 Harvard pi. 
10 Harvard pi. 

13 Mt. Vernon st. 

147 Walnut st. 

245 Medford st. 

47 Wallace st. 

13 Pleasant ave. 

5 Harvard ave., Brookline. 

106 Professors row. 

10 Harvard pi. 

92 Orchard st. 

30 Bow St. 

161 Summer st. 
13 Lincoln st. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 229 

TABLE 29.— Teachers in Service January, 1 906.— Continued. 



Grade. 


Name. 


Residence. 




PRESCOTT. 




9 


Samuel A. Johnson, Master, 


91 Perkins st. 


9 


Anna M. Bates, 


102 Bridge st. , Salem. 


8 


Emma M. Gate, 


15 Fletcher st. , Winchester. 


7 


Elizabeth M. Warren, 


64 Vinal ave. 


6 


Abbie A. Anderson, 


10 Pearl st. 


6 


Amelia I. Sears, 


Melrose Highlands. 


5 


Louise Townsend, 


10 Henry st.. Maiden. 


4 


Susie M. Hosmer, 


7 Vinton st., Melrose. 


3 


Clara Taylor, 


36 Flint St. 


3 


Elizabeth L. Marvin, 


17 Newbury st., Maiden. 


2 


Louise E. Pratt, 


110 Pearl st. 


2 


Jennie M. Twiss, 


11 Dana st. 


1 


Mattie L. Littlefield, 


65 Glen st. 


1 


A. Louise Bean, 

SANFORD HANSCOM. 


219 Main st. , Everett. 


5 


Elizabeth M. Collins, Principal, 


55 Putnam st. 


4 


Gertrude D. Goodale, 


61 Pearl st. 


3 


Helen S. Woodman, 


20 Cass St., Melrose. 


2 


Helen G. Frye, 


43 Sargent ave. 


1 


Lina E. Dill, 


34 Chauncey ave. 


Kindergarten 


Caroline Boardman, 


62 Highland ave. 


Assistant 


Fannie M. Hayden, 

DAVIS. 


856 Beacon st., Boston. 


4 


Mary A. Holt, Principal, 


72 Boston st. 


3 


Jennie A. Drew, 


50 Bancroft ave., Reading. 


2 


Carrie T. Lincoln, 


41-B Franklin st. 


1 


P. A. Merritt, 

CLARK BENNETT. 


96 Oxford St. 


5 


Annie E. McCarty, Principal. 


18 Quincy st. 


Assistant 


Kate B. Gifford, 


72 Berkeley st. 


4 


Jennette B. Snow, 


Norfolk Downs. 


4 


Caro G. Graydon, 


128 Oliver st., Maiden. 


3 


Agnes S. Campbell, 


11 Columbus ave. 


3 


Alice T. Mc Namara, 


35 St. James ave., Boston. 


2 


Katharine C. Connolly, 


21 School St. 


2 


Nettie L. Fay, 


67 Walnut st. 


2 


Isadore E.Taylor, 


36 Flint St. 


1 


Bertha M. Martindale, 


96 Glen st. 


1 


Miriam Cavanagh, 


10 Grand View ave. 


1 


Carrie L. Bliss 


4 Park ave. 


Kindergarten 


Caroline G. Baker, 


40 Benton road. 


Assistant 


Alice M. Saben, 

GEORGE L. BAXTER. 


110 Pearl st. 


5 


Helen Tincker, Principal, 


17 Bonner ave. 


4 


Elizabeth E. Carr, 


Danvers. 


3 


Julia A. Mahoney, 


16 Parker st. 


2 


Agatha G. F. Commins, 


24 Hanson st. 


1 


Charlotte Holmes, 


10 Putnam st. 


Kindergarten 


Elsie G. Ashton, 


17 Bonner ave. 


Assistant 


Eleanor Connor, 


59 Church st. 



I 



230 



ANNUAL KEPORTS. 



Table 29. —Teachers in Service January, 1906.— Concinued. 



Grade. 


Name. 


Residence. 




OREN S. KNAPP. 




9 


John S. Emerson, Master, 


9.5 Summer st. 


9 


Nina M. Doanan, 


22 Walnut st. 


8-9 


Elizabeth G. Diman, 


6 Hillside pk. 


8 


Harriet C. Hamilton, 


42 Walnut st. 


7-8 


Emma L. Coburn, 


27-r Albion st. 


7 


C. B. Parkhurst, 


22 Highland ave. 


6 


Clara B. Sackett, 


91 Summer st. 


6 


Edith Hersey, 


154 Washington ave., Chelsea, 


5 


Daisy King, 


641 Huntington ave., Boston. 


4 


Annie E. Robinson, 


20 Webster ave. 


3 


L. Gertrude Allen, 


230 Washmgton st. 


2 


Minnie Alice Perry, 


16 Pleasant ave. 


1 


Blanche L. Paine, 

ALBION A. PERRY. 


21 Concord ave. 


5 


Catherine E. Sweeney, 


633 Broadway. 


4 


Irene Vincent, 


85 Prospect st. 


3 


Mary G. Blackwell, 


45 Ibbetson st. 


3-2 


Helen M. Cogan, 


24 Stone ave. 


1 


Margaret L. O'Malley, 

CHARLES G. POPE. 


57 Ellery St., Cambridge. 


9 


George M. Wadsworth, Master, 


23 Munroe st. 


9 


Florence A. Chaney, 


78 Huntington ave., Boston. 


8 


Harriet M. Clark, 


10 Vernon St., West Medford. 


7 


Alice I. Norcross, 


26 Russell ave., Watertown. 


7 


B. May Layman, 


17 Aldersey st. 


6 


Blanche G. North, 


8 Munroe st. 


6 


Minnie A. Blood, 


1 Essex st 


5-6 


Lena F. Shaw, 


8 Wellington ct. , Roxbury. 


5 


Lizzie W. Parkhurst, 


22 Highland ave. 


i 


Annie G. Sheridan, 


84 Prospect st. 


3 


Mabel K. Davis, 


11 Harvard pi. 


2 


Florence E. Locke, 


Needham. 


1 


Alice B. Frye, 

LUTHER V. BELL. 


10 Sunnyside ave. 


^ 


Harlan P. Knight, Master, 


61 Putnam st. 


9 


Alice L. Davis, 


19 Aldersey st. 


8 


Nellie S. Dickey,* 


54 Putnam st. 


8 


Ada F. Smith, 


25 Albion st. 


7 


Eva R. Barton, 


Stoneham. 


•8-7 


Grace E. Weeks, 


32 Vinal ave. 


6 


Mabel T. Totman, 


9 Hamlet st. 


6 


Maribelle Curtis, 


55 Putnam st. 


5 


Emma F. Schuch, 


25 Tufts St. 


5 


Florence S. Hartshorn, 


96 Glen st. 


4 


Ella H. Bucknam, 


1 Essex St. 


3 


Helen L. McGann, 


45 Putnam st. 


2 


Martha E. Daniels, 


93 Concord ave. 


1 


Lucia Alger, 


28 Bonner ave. 



I 



I 



* Leave of absence for one year. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



231 



Table 29. — leathers in Service January, 1906. — Continued. 



Grade. 



3 
5-4 

2 
1 



9 
9 
8 
8 
7 
6 

6-6 
5 
4 
4 
3 

3-2 

2 

1 

1 

Kinder^rten 

Assistant 



Name. 



CUMMINGS. 
Fannie L. Gwynne, Principal, 
Ruth B. Stanley, 
Angeline Cann, 
Elizabeth L. Hersey, 

EDGERLY. 

Charles E. Brainard, Master, 

Mary Corry, 

Annie L. Dimpsey, 

Mary E. Richardson, 

Mabel C. Mansfield, 

Maud J. Nickerson, 

Isabelle M. Gray, 

Edith M. Snell, 

G. Hortense Pentecost, 

J. Louise Smith, 

Lillian Nealley, • 

Alice W. Cunningham, 

Martha M. Power, 

JACOB T. GLINES. 

Mary E. Northup, Master, 

Mary E. Stiles, 

Nellie E. Briggs, 

Mary A. Lawry, 

Blanche S. Hall, 

Lilla M. Marble, 

Zelpha L. Thayer, 

Ellen A. Boynton, 

M. Frances Guptill, 

Mary A. Goddard, 

Margaret A. Orr, 

Florence E. Baxter, 

Anna G. Welch, 

Carrie Armitage, 

Belle J. Tifft, 

Mrs. Etta D. Ellsworth, 

Ida M. Kane, 

FORSTER. 

Fred C. Baldwin, Master, 
Mary E. Bunton, 
Irene S. Nightingale, 
Jessie M. Lockwood, 
Mary C. Buck, 
Mae E Brock, 
Emma G. Blanchard, 
Mina P. Bickford, 
Elizabeth F Clement, 
Mary L Bradish, 
Elizabeth S. Brown, 
Laura R. Cunningham, 
Gertrude M. Sias, 
E. Mina Smith, 
Annie S. Gage. 
Mabel G. Delano. 
Martha L. Hale, 
Grace Shorey, 
Cora J. Demond, 



Residence. 



65 School St. 
19 Harvard st. 
Hotel Woodbridge. 
Franklin Sq. House, Boston. 



82 Munroe st. 

Hotel Woodbridge. 

90 Pearl st. 

35 Bradley st. 

35 Bradley st. 

116 Pearl'st. 

23 Webster st 

4 Vine St., Melrose. 

151 Walnut st. 

196 Washington St., Lynn. 

109 Glen st. 

55 Richdale ave. 

37 Gleasonst., West Medford. 



15 Evergreen ave- 
15 Evergreen ave. 
15 Evergreen ave. 
118 Rogers ave. 

8 Wellington ct., Roxbury. 
2 Rush St. 

64 Linden St., Reading. 
45 Dartmouth st. 
43 Franklin st. 

9 Winter Hill Circle. 
15 Blagden St., Boston. 
49 Hudson st. 

324 Main st., Stoneham. 

57 Madison st. 

201 School St. 

112 Newbury st., Boston. 

28 Fellsway West. 



63 Sycamore st. 
14 Stickney ave. 

14 Court St., Arlington. 
463 Medford st. 

15 Gushing st., Medford. 
61 Hancock st. 

The Prescott, Everett. 
216 Park St., Medford. 
29 Kidder ave. 

54 Logan ave., Medford. 
19 Highland ave. 

55 Richdale ave. 

37 Wordsworth st.. East Boston. 

2 Pembroke st. 

32 Marshall st. 

108 Cross St. 

144 Highland ave. 

23 Forster st. 

The Prescott, Everett. 



232 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

TABLE 29.— Teachers in Service January, 1906.— Continued. 



Grade. 


Name. 




BINGHAM. 


9 


Harry F. Hathaway, Principal, 


9 


Elizabeth J. O'Neil, 


8 


Elizabeth J. Mooney, 


7 


Jane Batson, 


6 


Naomi E. Stevens, 


6 


Mabel E. Perry, 


5 


Lucy K. Hatch, 


5 


Harriet F.Ward, 


4 


Eva M, Barrows, 


4 


Helen L. Galvin, 


3 


Harriet M. Bell, 


3 


Bessie J. Baker, 


2 


Cirace F. Mulcahy, 


2 


Alice R. Lincoln, 


1 


Nellie R. Bray, 


1 


Mabel E. Mansir, 


1 


Clara L, Griffiths, 



9 

9 
8 
8 
7 
7 
6 
6 
5 
5 
4 
3,4 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 



MARTIN W. CARR. 

Charles G. Ham, Master, 
Anne E. Bragdon, 
Clara D. Eddy, 
Mary E. Soule, 
May E. Berry, 
Harriet A. Hills, 
Marie T. Smith, 
Marion P. Crawford, 
Susie L. Luce, 
Mary A. Haley, 
Elizabeth S. Foster, 
Grace T. Merritt, 
Florence B. Howland, 
Florence M. Dearborn, 
Ethel F. Morang, 
Gertrude Friend, 
Annie B. Russell, 



MORSE. 

MiNA J. Wendell, Master, 

♦Alice E. Jones, 

Lina M. Hooper, 

Minnie A. Day, 

Minnie E. Haas, 

Lennie W. Bartlett, 

Emma A. Gilman, 

Anna E. Sawyer, 

Lizzie E. Hill, 

Alice B. Hazelton, 

Agnes C. Rice, 

Ardelle Abbott, 

Alice M. Emerson, 

Grace S. Russell, 



Residence. 



505 Broadway. 

505 Broadway. 

3 Lee st. 

32 Florence st., Maiden. 

14 Stickney ave. 

23 Albion st. 

103 Glenwood ave. 

202 School St. 

118 Rogers ave. 

Brain tree. 

14 Chapel st. 

13 Mills St., Maiden. 

143 Sycamore st. 

885 Mass. ave., Cambridge. 

7 Jasper st. 

77 Albion st. 

39 Ames st. 



Watertown. 
53 Laurel st. 
70 Central st. 
124 Summer St. 
14 Billingham st. 
14 Billingham st^ 
87 Orchard st. 
124 Summer st. 
8 Walter ter. 
117 Summer st. 
99 Summer st. 
47 Cherry st. 
6 Highland ave. 
63 Preston rd. 
157 Lowell St. 
6 Park ave. 
45 Russell st. 



211-A Summer st. 

53 Laurel st. 

Boston. 

( helnisford, Mass. 

Preston rd. 

99 Summer st. 

130 Huntington ave., Boston 

26 Bow St. 

35 Norway st., Boston. 

124 Summer st. 

20 Spring Hill terrace. 

71 Craigie st. 

146 Highland ave. 

1097 Broadway. 



•Leave ot absence for one year. 



SCHOOL DEPAETMENT. 



233 



TABLH 29. — Teachers in Service January^ 1906.— Continued. 



Grade. 


Name. 


Residence. 




GEORGE 0. PROCTOR. 




6 


Nora F. Byard, 


101-A Fayerweather St., Cambridge. 


5 


Margaret D. Jack, 


58 Pinckney st. 


4 


Abbie A Gurney, 


28 Bonner ave. 


4,3 


Ella P. McLeod, 


32 Chamwood rd. 


3 


Clara L. Hammond, 


62 Chandler st. 


2 


Edith L. Hunnewell, 


23 Milton st. 


2,1 


Inez Dill, 


34 Chauncey ave. 


1 


Elizabeth T. Burrage, 

GEORGE W. DURELL. 


20 Dartmouth st. 


4 


Abigail P. Hazelton, Principal, 


124 Summer st. 


3 


Etta C. Rochefort, 


1 Forest pk., Cambridge. 


2 


Ethel Worcester, 


24 Brastow ave. 


1 


Mary Winslow, 

BURNS. 


38 Spring st. 


7 


Laura J. Brooks, Principal, 


31 Stevens st., Stoneham. 


6 


Cara M. Johnson, 


147 Park ave., Arlington. 


5 


Minnie S. Turner, 


153 Lowell St. 


4 


Elizabeth A. Davies, 


230 Morrison ave. 


3 


A. L. Brown, 


281 Summer st. 


2 


Mary E. Lacy, 


63 Cherry st. 


1,2 


Emma B. Jones, 


18 Sargent ave. 


1 


Alice E. Morang, 

BENJAMIN G. BROWN. 


157 Lowell St. 


6 


Annih G. Smith, Principal, 


24 Florence St., Maiden. 


5 


Grace J. Alexander, 


60 College ave. 


4 


Edna M. Proctor, 


93 Revere St., Boston. 


3 


Lucy M. Curtis, 


77 Walnut st. 


2 


Grace M. Bliss, 


78 Summer st. 


1 


Ida M. Record, 

HIGHLAND. 


29 Browning rd. 


9 


Aaron B. Palmer, Master, 


18 Bay State rd. 


9 


M. Alice Paul, 


122 Orchard st. 


9 


Edna F. Grant, 


18 Hall ave. 


9 


P. E. Mathews, 


201 Morrison ave. 


8 


N. Irene Ellis, 


15 Kidder ave. 


8 


Grace M. Clark, 


10 Vernon st.. West Medford. 


8 


Jennie P. Chapman, 


23 Pleasant St., Woburn. 


7 


Edith G. Watts, 


201 Morrison ave. 


7 


*Jennie C. Frazier, 


561 Columbus ave., Boston. 


7 


Frances A. Darrah, 




6 


Mary L. Bryant, 


38 Chandler st. 


6 


Sarah E. Pray, 


28 Quincy st. 


5 


Mary H. Joyce, 


76 Boston st. 


5 


Lillian F. Richardson, 


33 Wallace st. 



*Leave of absence till June 30, 1906. 



234 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



TABLE 29. — Teachers in Service January, 1906.— Continued. 



Grade. 




WM. H. HODGKINS. 

Arthur L. Doe, Master, 
Alice M. Winslow, 
Etta M. Miller, 
Edith W. Emerson, 
Alice S. Hall, 
Lilla E. Mann, 
Josephine T. Field, 
Gertrude W. Leighton, 
Beatrice A. Randall, 
Flora A. Burgess, 
Catherine A. Burden, 
Genieve R. Barrows, 
Katherine M. Fox, 
Jennie M. Patterson, 
Marion I. Noyes, 

LINCOLN. 

Eltza H. Lunt, Principal, 
Charlotte F. Mott, 
Almena J. Mansir, 
Annie H. Hall, 

MARTHA PERRY LOWE. 

May E. Small, Principal, 
Stella M, Holland, 
Alice M. Dorman, 
Maude C. Valentine, 
Jane M. Taaffe, 
Katherine E. Hourahan, 
Clara G. Hegan, 
Martha A. Jencks, 

EVENING SCHOOL 
PRINCIPALS. 

John A. Avery, High. 
Charles T. Murray, Prescott. 
John S. Emerson, Befl. 
*Fred C. Baldwin, Forster. 
Harry F. Hathaway, Forster. 
Charles E. Brainard, Highland. 



Residence. 



86 Chandler st. 

16 Park ave. 
151 Walnut st. 
135 Central st. 
135 Central st. 

15 Day st., Cambridge. 
62 Chandler st. 
56 College ave. 
96 College ave. 
Arlington Heights. 
404 Highland ave. 
Woburn, Mass. 
Stoneham. 

17 Avon St. 
22 Dover st. 



50 Curtis St. 

154 Charles st., Boston. 

77 Albion st. 

97 College ave. 



7 Kingston st. 

46 Chester st. 

201 Morrison ave. 

1098 Broadway. 

159 Morrison ave. 

12 Grove st. 

100 School St. 

153 Powder House b'lVd. 



♦Leave of absence. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



235 



TABLE 29.— Teachers in 


Service 


January, 1906.— Concluded. 


Grade. 


Name. 


Residence. 

• 




SPECIAL TEACHERS. • 








MUSIC. 








7-13 
6-1 


S. Henry Hadley, 
Charlotte D. Lawton, 

DRAWING. 






46 Pearl st. 

68 Warrenton st., Boston. 


9-1 


Mary L. Patrick, 

SEWING. 






Newtonville. 


8-6 
8-6 
8-6 


Mary L. Boyd, 
Emma J. Ellis, 
Bertha P. Paul, 

PENMANSHIP. 






43 Thurston St. 
54 Marshall st. 
23 Monmouth st. 


9-1 


Wm. A. Whitehouse, 






25 Greene st. 



TABLE 30.— OFFICERS IN SERVICE JANUARY, 1906. 





Name. 


■ Residence. 




SUPERINTENDENT. 






Gordon A. South worth, 


40 Greenville st. 




CLERK. 






Cora S. Fitch, 


82 Munroe st. 




TRUANT OFFICERS. 






Lemuel H. Snow, 
Jairus Mann, 


75 Benton roakd. 
80 Porter st. 



236 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 31.— SCHOOL JANITORS, JANUARY, 1906, 



School. 


Name. 


Residence. 


Latin High, S . . . 


Joseph Young 


51 Oxford St. 


English High. S 






Lewis G. Keene 


30 Berkeley St. 


Prescott. S, 12 . 






George A. McGunnigle 


50 Pearl St. 


Hanscom, S, 6 








Warren Hallett 


153 Walnut St. 


Davis, F, 4 








N. L. Pennock 


54 Putnam St. 


Bennett. S. 12 








Daniel T. Campbell 


140 Medford St. 


Baxter, S, 6 








Israel Winterbottom 


2 Bolton St. 


KnapD, S, 12 








John C. Sampson 


40 School St. 


Perryf S, 6 








Henry C. Bradford 


72 Boston St. 


Pope, F, 12 








Hiram A. Turner 


16 Gibbens St. 


Bell. S, 12 . 








F. S. Dickinson 


1 Putnam St. 


Cummings, F, 4 








William T. Higgins 


53 Prescott St. 


Edgerly, S, 12 




, 




Charles P. Horton 


22 Everett Ave. 


Glines, S, 14 








Roy C. Burckes 


249 School St. 


Forster, S, 18 








John H. Kelley 


W Sycamore St. 


Forster 








James L. Whitaker 


146-R Sycamore St. 


Bingham, S, 16 








John F. O'Brien 


347 Lowell St. 


Carr, S, 16 . 








James W. Rich 


206 Highland Ave. 


Morse, F, 12 








Edwin B. Price 


67 Church St. 


Proctor S, 8 








Thomas A. Galbraith 


104 Highland Ave. 


Durell, S, 4 








George H. Clapp 


35- A Franklin St. 


Burns, S, 8 








Charles Gallaway 


160 Hudson St. 


Brown, S, 6 








O. M. Pote 


23 Howe St. 


Highland, F, 12 






E. Parker Cook 


398 Highland Ave. 


Hodgkins, S, 14 






Andrew B. Colesworthy 


33 Simpson Ave. 


Lowe, S, 8 . 






John F. Richardson 


190 Morrison Ave. 


Lincoln, S, 4 






Thomas C. Dame 


1 Ellsworth St. 



Buildings heated by steam are marked " S," by furnace " F." The numbers show the 
number of rooms. 

The high schools are heated by a single plant in Latin building. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND OFFICERS. 

OF THE SOMERVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY, YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1905. 

Trustees. 

Charles A. West. Irving G. Hall. 

Edward C. Booth, M. D. Frederick W. Parker. 

George W. Perkins. John B. Viall. 

Howard D. Moore. J. Frank Wellington. 

Charles S. Soule. 

Officers. 

Charles A. West President. 

Sam Walter Foss Secretary. 

Committees. 

Building and Grounds — Viall, Perkins, and Hall. 

Administration — Wellington, Soule, and Parker. 

Books and Catalogues — West, Viall, Booth, Wellington, Moore, and Hall. 

Finance — Perkins, Hall, and Parker. 

Librarian. 

Sam Walter Foss. 
Assistant Librarian. 

Adele Smith. 

Cataloguer. 

Esther M. Mayhew. 

Assistant Cataloguer. 

Edith B. Hayes. 

Children's Librarian. 

Anna L. Stone. 

School Librarian. 

Mary S. Woodman. 

Reference and Art Librarian. 

Mabel E. Bunker. 

Assistants. 

Florence D. Hurter. Charlotte R. Lowell. 

Bessie L. Duddy. Charles A. Perry. 

Nellie M. Whipple. F. Stuart Dean. 

Alice W. Sears. Truman Gushing. 

Florence M. Barber. Saxton C. Foss. 

Janitor. 

Charles A. Southwick. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY ACCOUNT. 



Receipts and Expenditures [forjl 905. 

A . . CREDIT. 

Appropriation .... <ti4 t:AA aa 

Doo- tax $14,500 00' 

Commissioner public buildings '.*.'"'* ' ? aa 

Fines etc • . . . . < uu 

^' ^^^ 746 08 

'^^^^^ * . . $19,358 22 

R^JfJjn/" periodicals $6^15g 45, 

card^ : : ; 1,996 % 

^:^f-^ ...::::: : : : 4?575 

^^^^^^^^ 9,388 72 

^^^"Pes 4g5 g5 

Repairs 17 77 

g^P^ess *.*.**.*. ; 414 63 

P^ftage 30 00 

ielephone 49 46 

Supplies •...*.' 21 27 

Binders 4 gQ 

Pictures * g 75 

Insurance '.*.'. 135 00 

Ice 7 30 

Chart 15 00 

Chair 7 00 

Book case 8 18 

Signs 18 00 

Total . . ■ $19,358 22 

Isaac Pitman Art Fund. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1904 $5 61 

Interest February 1, West End Road Bonds ... 80 00 

" July 1, American Telephone & Telegraph Co. . 80 00 

Dec. 31, " " " " " . 80 00 

To;tal $245 61 

DEBIT. 

Books and pictures purchased in 1905 $161 16 

Balance carried to 1906 ' . . . 84 45 

Total $245 61 

Isaac Pitman Poetry jFund. 

CREDIT. 

Balance from 1904 $44 12 

Interest February 1, West End Road Bonds ... 20 00 

" July 1, American Telephone & Telegraph Co. . 20 00 

Dec. 31, " " " " " . 20 00 

Total $104 12 

DEBIT. 

Books purchased in 1905 45 73 

Balance carried to 1906 5S 39 

Total $104 12 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



To His Honor, the Mayor, and Board of Aldermen of the City 
of Somerville : — 

The trustees of the pubHc hbrary beg: to submit herewith 
their thirty-third annual report. 

It has been the pleasure almost uniformly of this board to 
record in their annual report an increase in the nvimber of books 
delivered for home use, and it is again their pleasure to^ record a 
substantial increase during the present year of over 40,000 
volumes, or a total circulation of upwards of 391,000 as against 
353,286 during the year 1904. 

The Somerville public library still retains its position in the 
matter of circulation as second only to the city of Boston in the 
New England states. As near as can be ascertained by the 
librarian of congress, it is the twentieth in the United States in 
this respect, although the sixtieth in point of population. As 
stated in our previous report, such figures and comparisons are 
gratifying. 

It is also a source of satisfaction that, notwithstanding the 
increase in circulation during the past year, the business of the 
library has been conducted without an increase in appropriation, 
but it must not be expected that this continual growth in the 
library can go on without a proportionate amount of funds are 
placed at its disposal. 

The general support given to the library by the public must 
not in any way be discouraged, but, on the contrary, every facility 
should be given to our citizens, and every encouragement should 
be offered to them to increase the use of the library. As "the 
commonwealth requires the education of the people as a safe- 
guard of order and liberty," this municipality should not be in the 
least backward in supplying -suitable literature for the use of its 
citizens in sustaining and supporting the requirements of our 
commonwealth. 

The public schools are among the foremost of the patrons of 
the library, and the circulation to the pupils is constantly and 
steadily increasing. The value of the reference books at their 
command cannot be overestimated, and during the past year the 
number of reference w^orks has been materially increased in re- 
sponse to urgent demands. There has been distributed to the 
various schoolrooms in the city 89,998 books, as against 82,714 
books in the previous year. The library supplies 157 school- 
rooms with small libraries of usually forty volumes each, which 
is a very material aid in the general circulation. 



24:0 ANNUAL KEPORTS. 

There are also supplied 100 books each to ten different Sun- 
day schools, which are gratefully appreciated. 

The business done at the six different general agencies 
shows a very gratifying increase, on the whole ; the agencies at 
West Somerville have increased in greater proportion, in conse- 
quence of the large increase in population in that section of the 
city. Your attention is again called to the importance of con- 
sidering at no distant date the subject of providing more suitable 
accommodations to the citizens of West Somerville for the easier 
access to the privileges of the library. This matter has been 
frequently considered by the board, who are not only willing, 
but anxious to do something for the citizens of this section when- 
ever the funds are placed at their disposal. We therefore again 
recommend the proposition for your serious consideration. 

Our house-to-house delivery of books to the homes of 
people is still continued, to the usual satisfaction of the patrons. 

The report of the librarian submitted herewith will furnish a 
complete record of the business of the library, which speaks for 
itself, and is an evidence of the faithful work performed by him 
and his able corps of assistants. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles A. West, 

President. 
December 26, 1905. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN. 



To the Trustees of the Somerville Pubhc Library : — 

I herewith submit the hbrarian's thirty-third annual report. 
Below is a statement in detail relative to the various depart- 
ments : — 

The Cataloguing Department. 

The cataloguing- department, under the supervision of Mi^s 
Esther M. Mayhew, has had another busy year. In order to still 
further simplify the cataloguing system and to gain much addi- 
tional time, the accession book has been abandoned, all the data 
preserved in this book now being transferred to the cards of the 
shelf list. Considerable time and labor have been saved by this 
device, and no disadvantage is apparent. 

A shelf list for the children's room has been prepared during 
the past year. All the departments of the library are now 
equipped with special shelf lists. 

Below are the statistics of books withdrawn from the library, 
books added to the library, and books bound by the library dur- 
ing the year : — 



Books Added 

Accession number January 1, 1905 

" 1906 
Total number of books added during 1905 
Books new to library .... 

Duplicates 

Total number withdrawn 

Total number of books in library . 



Binding. 



Volumes rebound 
Periodicals bound 
Paper-covered books bound 
Pamphlets 



Total 



75,173 
81,519 
6,346 
3,086 
3,260 
9,280 
72,239 



4,319 

452 

59 

40 

4,870 



Books Withdrawn. 



Number of books worn out 

" " " lost by general readers 

" burned on account of infectious exposure . 

Total number withdrawn 

Total number of books withdrawn to January 1, 1905 

during 1905 



796 
38 
20 



854 



8,426 
854 



Total 



9,280 



242 ANNUAL EEPORTS. 

School Department. 

The school department; under the supervision of Miss Mary 
S. Woodman, has done an increased amount of work. The rela- 
tions between the library and the schools are very pleasant and,, 
it is hoped, mutually helpful. Below are the statistics for the 
year : — 

Libraries out 151 

Volumes out 5,742 

Volumes delivered during j'-ear 7^384 

Circulation during year: — 

Fiction 43,923 

Non-fiction ^ . 46,075 

Total 89,998 

These figures represent only a part of the work done by this 
department. The school librarian makes many visits tO' the 
schools, and by consultation with the teachers becomes better in- 
formed as to the needs of the schools. Some exhibit of work 
done by the school pupils is placed on view in the library every- 
year. This year an exhibit of penmanship was held in the library 
for several weeks, under the supervision of Mr. Whitehouse, the 
supervisor of penmanship, who gave daily lectures. The various 
teachers of all the schools, with their scholars, visited the library 
in regular order. In this way the library aimed to come in direct 
contact with every pupil in the public schools. At this time 
every pupil was offered a library card ; and thus the library per- 
sonally tendered its good services to upwards of 10,000 pupils. 
In this way it reached many hundreds who had never before been 
brought in contact with the library. The amount of good done 
in this way is not easily calculated. If some scheme equally 
effective could be devised to bring all the adults of the city in. 
direct contact with the library, it would be worthy of consid- 
eration. 

Reference and Art Department. 

The reference and art department, under the supervision of. 
Miss Mabel E. Bunker, has done an increased amount of work. 
Below is given the monthly attendance for the year : — 

January 1,499 

February 1,552 

March 1,440 

Aoril - 792 

May 871 

June 1,021 

July 637 

August . . : 465- 

September 748 

October 1,243 

November 1,217 

December 853 

Total ~T2,338. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 243 

During the year there have been fifteen art exhibits, as 
follows : — 

. Rome, No. 3. 
Rome, No. 4. 
Switzerland, No. 2. 
Birds of New England. 
Amiens. 

Switzerland, No. 2. 
(Penmanship of Somerville pupils.) 
Assisi. 

Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand, No. 1. 
Modern German Sculpture, Pt. 2. 
New Brunswick. 
Florence, No. 5. 

Local views— Beverly, Medford, Westford, Mass., Pawtucket, R. L, 
and St. Johnsbury, Vt. 
Yachts. 
Venice, No. 4. 

Some works of importance have been purchased during the- 
year, among which may be mentioned : — 

Alexandre's Puvis de Chavannes. 

Beach's and Thome's American Business and Accounting Encyclo- 
paedia. 

Bell's Nuremberg. 

Ditchfield's Picturesque English Cottages and Their Doorway 
Gardens. 

Foster's Miniature Painters. 

Great Events by Famous Historians. 

Hodgson's and Eaton's Royal Academy and Its Members. 

Jungman's Norway. 

Klassiker Kunst, 4v. 

Lippincott's New Gazetteer of the World. 

Mason's Indian Basketry, 2v. 

Mitton's Scenery of London. 

Moore's Lace Book. 

Palmer's English Lakes. 

Ricci's Pintorrichio, His Life, Work, and Times. 

Again the reference room is becoming painfully over- 
crowded. To relieve the pressure for a few years^ low shelves 
might be built around the exhibit room, reserving space enough 
above them for the exhibition of pictures. 

The Children's Department. 

The children's department, under the supervision of Miss 
Anna L. Stone, still continues one of the most important depart- 
ments of the library. Every effort has been made to beautify 
and enliven the children's room. Several attractive pictures have 
been purchased for the walls, and during the year. many pleasant 
and educative picture bulletins have been exhibited. 

The removal of the newspaper room from the proximity of 
the children's room has been a good thing in every respect. 
Much better order can be maintained in the children's room, and 
the newspapers, in their new^ quarters, are much more generally 
read than formerly. i 



*^44 ANNUAL EEPOETS. 

_A large number of duplicate books have been purchased 
during the year, and a large number should be purchased in the 
immediate future. The Sunday schools, in their selection of 
books, draw more largely from the children's room than from the 
rest of the Hbrary, and this necessitates a large purchase of juve- 
nile works. 

The circulation of the children's room during the year has 
been 70,184, of which 54,746 have been fiction and 15,438 other 
works. This of course does not represent the aggregate of juve- 
nile circulation. It is probably not an exaggeration to say that 
the children take as many books from other parts of the library 
as from the children's room. 

Agencies. 

The agencies continue to do good service, though from the 
nature of the case their work cannot be entirely satisfactory to 
the public. Of course, it is impossible for the stores where these 
agencies are installed to give up a very large space to books from 
the public library. Although an increasing number of books are 
furnished the agencies, the public complains at the meagreness 
of our collections. More complaints come from the West Som- 
erville agencies than elsewhere. A branch library in this section 
of the city would remedy many difificulties. 



PUBLIC LIBKAEY. 



245 



Below is a table of circulation of the different agencies dur- 
ing the year: — 



Agencies. 






H C/2 




rt o 


■> 

s 6 
o o 
w CO 




T3 
C 

X 


January . 
Shelves . 








700 
1,126 


387 
1,790 


58 
684 


268 


54 

389 




February 

Shelves 








667 
997 


375 
1,547 


46 
590 


205 


17 


45 

618 


March 
Shelves . 








649 
1,180 


333 
1,521 


43 

584 


272 


25 
509 


47 
808 


April 
Shelves . 








642 
1,061 


303 
1,472 


39 
400 


315 


16 
149 


32 

848 


May 
Shelves . 








784 
1,213 


359 

1,788 


48 
644 


344 


21 

348 


52 
623 


June 
Shelves . 








530 
1,263 


298 
1,267 


24 
520 


217 


19 
496 


26 

704 


July . . 
Shelves 








494 

1,058 


256 
1,276 


32 
477 


214 


8 
385 


29 
639 


August . 
Shelves • 








405 
1,247 


322 
1,537 


22 

820 


294 


21 
467 


30 
1,239 


September 
Shelves . 








323 
1,044 


264 
1,367 


16 
455 


227 


15 

332 


8 
1,105 


October . 
Shelves . 








508 
1,311 


412 
1680 


18 
575 


266 


33 
422 


8 
1,015 


November 
Shelves . 








463 
1,167 


368 
1,319 


32 

607 


212 


25 
389 


9 
1,284 


December 

Shelves . 








428 
957 


323 
1,140 


38 
664 


230 


19 
196 


18 
869 


Totals .... 


20,217 


21,704 


7,436 


3,064 


4,355 


10,056 



General Work. 



The general work of the library, under the immediate super- 
vision of Aliss Adele Smith, the assistant librarian, shows a con- 
tinued development and increase. 



246 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



The general circulation figures of the year are as follows 

January 36,904 

February 34,102 

March . . ■ 37,037 

April ■ 33,563 

May 39,761 

June 29,072 

July 22,707 

August 25,648 

September - . . . 20,730 

October 38,943 

November ' 37,787 

December 35,529 

Total 391,783 



Last year the circulation was 353,286. There is conse- 
quently a net increase the current year of 38,497, or about eleven 
per cent. 

Below is given our circulation by classes, exclusive of 
fiction : — 



General works 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural science 

Useful arts 

Fine arts 

Literature 

History 



Total of general delivery 
Total of children's room 
Total of specials 

Total of other works 

Fiction . . . , 

Other works 

Total 
Percentage: — 

Fiction .... 
Other works . 



7,493 
1,608 
3,419 

13,822 
517 

10,218 
3,699 
7,077 

15.398 

32,862 

96,113 

15,438 

1,273 

112,824 

278,959 
112,824 

391,783 

71 1-3% 
28 2-3% 



Below is the statistical statement of the general work of 
the year : — 

Volumes in -library 81,519 

Volumes added n^'^oo 

Total circulation io? 

Delivered from children's room '''S'iftl 

" " Teele square 6,593 

« « " " shelves ..... 13,624 



PUBLIC LIBEAKY. 247 

Delivered from West Somerville 4,000 

shelves 17J04 

*' East Somerville „ 416 

shelves 7,020 

" South Somerville 3,064 

" " Union square ^ ^Jg 

" shelves 4,08J 

" Highland 304 

shelves ^'^J^ 

" Knapp school ^'^'^^ 

Volumes out in Sunday schools . . . . • • - Jt'oS 

" " school libraries ^^°^ 

Visitors in reference room AQoi 

Cards issued • • 

Fines $660^5 

Books ^-^ ^^ 

Telephone • • ^'^ ^^ 

Total $745 08 

During the year 328 vacation cards were issued, upon which 
1,947 books were taken out; 3,284 books were delivered to the 
homes of the people by our delivery boys. The following Sun- 
day schools take books from the library, most of them in lots of 
100 each : Bow-street Methodist, Park-avenue Methodist, Flint- 
street Methodist, Perkins-street Baptist, Prospect-hill Congrega- 
tional, the Second Adventist, the Second Unitarian, the Spring- 
hill Baptist, the West Somerville Baptist, and the Winter-hill 
Universalist. Seventv-five books are also sent to the poHce sta- 
tion. The Somervihe Boys' club has lately begun to receive 
books from the library. 

Inventory. 

During the year a thorough inventory of the entire library 
has been taken. Under our present conditions this is an under- 
taking that involves much more labor than a person unfamiliar 
with the library could realize. First it is determined how nearly 
the shelves correspond to the shelf list. When the shelves and 
the shelf list are first compared, of course a very large number 
of books are apparently missing. Then the discharging tray is 
examined to ascertain how many of these books are regularly 
charged to readers. After that the special list is examined to 
learn how many of the books are out with the holders of special 
cards. Then the agency list is examined to ascertain if the book 
is charged to any of our agencies. In the same way ''To-day's 
Slips," the ''Starred" books, the bindery slips, the bindery books, 
the reading room, the school libraries, the new book shelves, etc., 
have to be thoroughly examined before a book can be pro- 
nounced missing. It would be interesting, if possible, to know 
how long it takes to "run down" a book and ascertain whether 
it is lost or not. After all this process, the work is only begun. 
A second and a third inventory is taken, when the same process 



24:8 ANNUAL EEPOKTS. 

is again repeated. During these subsequent inventories fully 
fifty per cent, of the books charged as lost are discovered, and if 
the inventories should be indefinitely continued, it is probable 
that we should indefinitely continue to find books. 

Below is the statement by classes of the number of books 
missing in 1905 : — 

Magazines ^ _ ^ 12 

French .*,'.' 5 

German 2 

General 

Philosophy 4 

Theology 5 

. Sociology _ 9 

Natural science 14 

Useful arts . . ' 9 

Literature . - . 26 

Biography 11 

Travel 14 

History 18 

Philology 4 

Music 5 

Fiction 172 

Children's room . . . 173 

Reference, art, and Americana rooms 7 

Total 490 

In common with many librarians, I believe that the most 
careful inventory is sure to make an overstatement of the books 
lost. So many books are found months, and sometimes even 
years, after they have been declared lost that all inventory figures 
must be taken with much allowance. Considering the great 
number of books handled, the Somerville library's record of lost 
books is not a large one. None of the books lost are of much 
market value, and I do not believe that any professional thief is 
operating. There is no doubt that formerly books were some- 
times taken from the hbrary without being charged. Of course 
these books had to be counted as missing. A few months ago 
two sets of turnstiles were installed in the library. These turn- 
stiles will make it much more difficult for a person to leave the 
library without having his books properly charged. It is hoped 
that they may practically break up the practice. 

Growth. 

The taking of the regular five-year census during the present 
year furnishes an occasion to compare the growth of the library 
and the growth of our population. Somerville is reckoned 
among the rapidly-growing cities of the commonwealth. In 
1895 the population of the city was 52,200 ; in 1905 the popula- 
tion is 69,272, an increase of about thirty-two per cent. In 1895 
the public library was closed for four months, in order to install 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 249' 

the new stacks. But, reckoning- the circulation of these months 
the same as the circulation of the corresponding months of the 
previous year, the circulation of books would have been 96,998. 
In 1905 our circulation is 391,783, an increase of over 300 per 
cent. While the population has increased thirty-two per cent., 
the circulation of the library has increased upwards of 300 per 
cent. If the population of the city had increased as rapidly as 
has the circulation of the public library, we would now be a city 
of over 200,000 population. If the reading of good books is the 
standard of the community's intelligence, these statistics should 
be gratifying to our people. The library has increased corre- 
spondingly in other respects. In 1895 the stafT consisted of 
librarian and three assistants. There are now twelve assistants. 
Since that date the reference room has been opened to the public, 
a children's department has been added, and a school librarian 
has been appointed, who practically devotes her exclusive time 
to the service of the schools. An addition doubling its capacity 
has been annexed to the library. The growth of the library can- 
not be expected tO' continue at this rate indefinitely, although 
there are at present no indications of its diminution. Such being 
the conditions of our growth, it is evident that at least a slight in- 
crease in our appropriation is needed each successive year. 



^50 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



The library has received the following donations of books, 
pamphlets, and periodicals during the past year : — 



List of Donations. 



Association of the Bar 

Bates College 

Boston Atheneum . 

Boston Children's Friend Society 

Boston Economic Club . 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 

Bostonian Society 

Bennett Fund, Trustees of 

Berry, Charles W. 

Brown University 

Browning Club 

Cambridge, Mass. . 

Chamber of N. Y. Commerce 

Chandler, Hon. L. B. 

Children's Institutions 

Cutler, S. Newton . 

Dalton, Mrs. Charles X. 

Dartmouth College 

Dolbear, A. E. 

Elliot, Charles D. . 

Foss, Sam Walter . 

Goldsmith, Benj. W. 

Gould, Levi .... 

Green, Samuel S. . . . 

Hapgood, John G. 

Harvard University 

Hayes, Edith B. . . . 

Herbert, John 

Hill, James R. ... 

Hillside C:iub .... 

Indian Rights Association 

Irish Reform Association 

Lake Mohawk Conference 

Library of Congress 

Lincoln, Charles P. 

Littlefield, George E. 

Luce, Robert . 

Marshall, William I. 

Massachusetts . 

Massachusetts Civic League 

Missachusetts Institute of Techno 

Metropolitan Water Board 

Middlesex County . 

Missouri World's Fair, Commission 

Moon, Robert C, M. D. 

Morse Institute 

Mount Auburn Cemetery 

Museum of Fme Arts 

National Educational Association 

Nebraska Library Commission 



logy 



Vols. Pamph. Period 



Carried forward 



1 
1 

28 

1 
1 
1 
1 



75 



2 

1 

24 

1 
1 



164 



160 



60 



34 
50 



398 



PUBLIC LIBEARY. 



251 



LI5T OF DONATIONS.— Continued. 



i 



r 



\ 



Brought forward 
Newcomb, H. T. . 
New Hampshire College of Forestry 
New York Merchants' Association 
Peabody Institute .... 
Pennsylvania Home Teaching Society 
Perkins Institute .... 
Phillips, S. L. .... 

Pratt Institute .... 

Providence Atheneum 

Public Libraries : — 

Allegheny, Pa. ( Carnegie Library ) 
Arlington ( Robbins Library ) 
Atlanta, Ga. (Carnegie Library ) 
Baltimore (Enoch Pratt Library) 

Beverly 

Boston 

Braddock, Pa. ( Carnegie Library ) 
Bradford, Pa. ( Carnegie Library ) 

Brockton 

Bromley, Eng 

Brookline .... 

Brooklyn,-N. Y. . . . 

Burlington, Vt. (Fletcher Library) 

•Canton ..... 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

Chelsea ( Fitz Library ) 

Chicago, 111. (John Crerar Library 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Clinton ( Bigelow Library ) 

Concord 

Concord, N. H. 

Davenport, Iowa 

Dayton, Ohio 

Detroit, Mich. . 

District of Columbia 

Erie, Pa. . 

Everett ( Parlin Library ) 

Everett ( Shute Library) 

Fall River 

Fitchburg 

Groton 

Hagerstown, Maryland 

Halifax, N. S. . 

Hartford, Conn. 

Haverhill , 

Hoboken, N. J. 

Hyde Park 

Jersey City, N. J. 

Lancaster, 

Lawrence . 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Ludlow, Vt. ( Fletcher Memorial Library ) 



Vols. 

75 
1 



Pamph. 

60 

1 
1 

2 
1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
6 
1 
1 
1 

i 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



Period. 



398 



Carried forward 



81 



118 



398 



252 



ANNUAL EEPOETS. 



LIST OF DONATIONS. — Continued. 



Brought forward ...... 

Public Libraries ( Continued ) : — 

Lynn .......... 

Maiden 

Manchester, N. H 

Medford 

Milwaukee, Wis. ....... 

Nashville, Tenn. (Carnegie Library) 

Newark, N. J 

New Bedford 

Newburyport . 

New Haven, Conn 

Newington, N. H 

New Orleans, La 

Newton ......... 

Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

North Adams ( Houghton Memorial Library) 

Northampton 

Northampton ( Forbes Library ) . . . . 

Norwich, Conn. (Otis Library) . . .' . 

Omaha, Nebraska 

Paterson, N. J. 

Peoria, 111. ........ 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Pittsburg, Pa. ( Carnegie Library ) . 

Plainfield, N. J 

Portland, Me 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y. ( Adriance Memorial Library 

Providence, R. I 

Quincy ( Thos. Crane Library) . . . . 

Reading, Pa 

Rochester, N. H 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Salem, Mass 

San Francisco, Cal. ...... 

Scranton, Pa. ........ 

Seattle, Washington 

Springfield 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

Toledo, O. ........ 

Waltham • 

Wakefield 

Watertown ........ 

Westborough ........ 

Weymouth { Tufts Library ) 

Winchester ........ 

Winthrop 

Woburn ......... 

Worcester ........ 

Public Reservations 

Ralston and Siddons 

St. Louis Mercantile Library Association 

Sanborn, Carrie A. 

Sanborn, Helen }......••■ 

Scott, Mrs. J. W 

Simmons College ........ 

Simonds, Mrs. 

Society of Psychical Research .... 

Carried forward 



Vols. 



81 



7 
1 
3 

2 

77 



172 



Pamph. 

118 

1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
10 



1 

17 
1 



205 



Period. 



398 



91 



489 



PUBLIC LIBEAKY. 



253 



LIST OF DONATIONS. — Concluded. 



Brought forward 

Somerville, Mass 

Sprague, Homer B. .... 

State Library Commission 
Superintendent of Immigration (Ottawa) 

Tufts College 

Union Press, Philadelphia 

United States ...... 

University of Chicago .... 

University of Cincinnati 

University of Colorado .... 

Viall, John B. 

Washburn, Frank D. . . . 

West, Mabel 

Western Reserve University . 
Wilmington Institute .... 
Woodman, J. E. . 
Worcester Board of Trade 

Totals ..... 



Vols. 


Pamph. 


172 


205 


1 




1 




2 


1 


1 




1 


2 


1 




15 


1 


10 






1 


1 




1 




38 




1 






1 




2 




a 


245 


216 



Period. 



489 



490 



Remarks. 

As in many public libraries, the percentage of fiction is still 
about three times the circulation of all other books together. 
The library, through the special reading committee, takes un- 
usual precaution to seek out novels of real merit. After the 
merit of a novel is determined as far as human fallibility can 
determine it, it is purchased in as large numbers as our funds 
•will permit. I feel that our readers are given as many privileges 
in this line as we are justified in oiTering them. But it seems to 
me our readers of non-fiction, the comparatively small fraction 
who use what may be called the solid reading of the library, can 
safely be granted much greater privileges. Readers are now al- 
lowed to take out one book of fiction and one of non-fiction, or 
two books of non-fiction. I recommend that while readers shall 
still be restricted tO' one book of fiction, they may be allowed to 
take out as many books of non-fiction as they desire. I see no 
insuperable difficulty in the way to prevent us from doing this. 
As I have said, only about thirty per cent, of our readers are non- 
fiction readers, so the library will not be swamped by the number 
of people who will avail themselves of this new privilege. Now 
while the number of our non-fiction readers is only about thirty 
per cent of the entire number, the number of non-fiction books 
in the library is, at a rough estimate, upwards of eighty per cent. 
If the whole number of non-fiction readers, which is very im- 
probable, should ask for an increased number of books, eighty 
per cent, of the books of the library would be accessible to the 



254 ' ANNUAL EEPORTS. 

increased demand. The greater proportion of these books are 
now seldom used, and if any plan can be devised to render their 
use more general, a decisive benefit to the community will results 
I submit this recommendation to your careful consideration. 

My thanks are due to the members of the stafif for their faith- 
fulness, and to your board for your kindly co-operation. 

Sam Waltek Foss, 

Librarian. 
December 26, 1905. 



BOARD OF HEALTH 
1905 

Allen F. Carpenter, Chairman 
Edmund S. Sparrow, 
Wesley T. Lee, M. D. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

William P. Mitchell, Clerk and Agent to Issue Burial Permits. 

Caleb A. Page, Agent. 

Frank L. Morse, M. D., Bapteriologist. • 

Charles M. Berry, Inspector of Animals and Provisions. 

Julius E. Richardson, Milk Inspector. 

Duncan C. Greene, Plumbing Inspector. 

Edgar T. Mayhew, Superintendent Collection of Ashes and Offal. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



Office of thk Board of Hkai^th, ) 
City Hall, January i, 1906. | 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen: — 

Gentlemen, — We respectfully submit the following as the 
twenty-eighth annual report of the board of health, in which is 
presented a statement, tabulated and otherwise, of the sanitary 
condition of the city and the business of the board for the year 
ending December 31, 1905: — 

Nuisances. 

A record of nuisances abated during the year, in compliance 
with notices issued by the board, or under the board's direction, 
is presented in the following table: — 



nuisances abated in each district in 1905. 

(see description of districts in latter part of this report.) 





I. 


II. 


III. 


IV. 


V. 


VI. 


VII. 


VIII. 


IX. 


X. 


Total. 


Population ( estimated ). 


6,853 


6,985 


5,315 


5,529 


15,416 

1 
6 


10,755 


5,056 


4,670 


4,840 


4,581 


70,000 


Bakery offensive .... 
Cellar damp . _. . . . . 
Cesspool offensive . . . 


1 
5 


""3' 


"2 


2 


1 
4 






1 
2 

i 
11 

2 
1 

1 


1 
4 
3 
2 
2 
13 
1 
2 


5 


3 


4 

2 

1 


35 
5 








2 
1 
13 
1 
2 


1 
...... 

3 
1 


1 
1 
15 
4 
4 




7 


Cows kept without license . 
Drainage defective . . . 
Drainage emptying into cellar 
Drainage emptying on surface 
Fish offal 








5 


14 

3 
4 
1 
1 
3 
3 
4 
5 
2 

4 

1 

15 

1 

"5 

5 
17 

3 

2 
1 
5 

1 


12 

1 
2 


16 
2 
3 


14 
2 
4 


13 
1 
2 


132 
20 
25 

2 


Goats kept without license . 


"1 

2 
3 
3 
1 

' 2 
1 
8 
4 
1 
4 
3 
4 

1 
1 
2 
3 

1 

63 


1 

3 

1 
3 
3 

1 

1 

"'9' 






1 






3 


2 
1 

4 
2 

1 

1 

2 

11 


1 
1 
2 

1 

2 

2 
2 

8 






1 
2 
2 
1 
2 

2 


1 
7 
4 
3 

1 

2 

1 
8 


12 


Hennery offensive . . . 
Manure exposed and offensive 
Manure pit defective . . . 

Offal on land 

Offensive odor in and about 

dwellings 

Pigs kept without license . 
Premises dirty ..... 
Privy-vault offensive . . 


1 
3 

2 
1 

2 
4 


1 
3 

1 
1 

3 
1 

7 


3 

2 
2 
1 

3 


22 
30 
23 
13 

22 
8 


8 


6 


89 
9 
















1 


Rubbish in cellar .... 
Slops thrown on surface 
Stable infected with glanders 
Stable and stable premises 

filthy and offensive . . 
Stable without drainage . . 
Stagnant water on surface . 
Water-closet defective . . 
Water under stable . . . 


1 
2 
1 

4 
1 
1 
6 

2 

63 


3 
4 
2 

3 

2 
1 
8 
2 


3 

2 
2 

2 
2 
1 
4 


2 
3 

5 
1 

2 . 

5 

1 


4 
2 

1 

2 
1 

1 
4 

55 


2 
2 

1 

2 
1 
2 
3 

1 


2 
1 


3 
3 


29 

27 
28 


1 
1 
1 
5 


4 

2 
3 
6 
4 


27 
14 

15 
49 
12 


Total 


106 


70 


58 


72 


56 


46 


80 


669 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 257 

Number of nuisances abated 669 

Number of nuisances referred to board of 1906 . 60 

Number of nuisances complained of . . . 729 
Number of complaints (many covering more than 

one nuisance) 427 

Number of notices mailed 501 

Number of notices served by constables . . 4 

In addition to the above, 267 dead animals have been re- 
moved from the pubhc streets, and many nuisances have been 
abated on verbal notice from the agent, without action by the 
board, of which no record has been made. Each spring the 
whole city is examined, and cellars, yards, and alleyways where 
rubbish and filth have collected are required to be cleaned. 

Glanders. — Twenty-eight cases of glanders have been re- 
ported during the year. Prompt action was taken in every case, 
and twenty-seven of the horses were killed, one being released 
from quarantine by order of the cattle commissioners. 

Permits. 

The record of permits to keep cows, swine, goats, and hens, 
to collect grease, and to remove manure is as follows: — 

Cows. — Thirty-eight applications were received for permits 
to keep 153 cows. Thirty-three permits to keep 129 cows were 
granted, and five permits were refused. 

Swine. — Nineteen applications were received for permits to 
keep thirty-four swine. Seventeen permits were granted to keep 
thirty swine, and two permits were refused. The fee is one 
dollar for each swine. 

Goats. — Six applications were received for permits to keep 
six goats. Five permits were granted to keep five goats, and 
one permit was refused. The fee is one dollar for each goat. 

Hens. — Seventy-three applications for permits to keep 1,627 
hens were received. Sixty-nine permits to keep 1,566 hens were 
granted, and four permits were refused. 

Grease. — Fifteen applications were received for permits to 
collect grease, fourteen of which were granted. The fee is two 
dollars. Four of the parties licensed reside in Somerville, two in 
Charlestown, five in Cambridge, two in Boston, and one in 
Chelsea. 

Manure. — Two permits were issued during the year for the 
carting of manure through the streets of the city in the daytime 
between May 1 and November 1. All permits issued for the re- 
moval of manure from the stables in the city in the daytime, or for 
carting through the streets of the city, remain in force until re- 
voked. No fee is charged for these permits. 

Melting and Rendering. — Three parties have been licensed to 
carry on the business of melting and rendering, under the pro- 
visions of the revised laws of 1902, chapter 75, section 111. 



25 S , ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Pedlers. 

One hundred and fifty-two certificates of registration were 
issued to hawkers and pedlers during- the year under the pro- 
visions of ordinance number 27 — an increase of five over the year 
1904. One hundred and eighteen certificates have been renewed 
during the year. Each pedler is required to present a writing 
from the sealer of weights and rcieasures, showing that his meas- 
ures have been properly sealed, before a certificate is issued to 
him. Pedlers are also required to present their vehicles at the 
police station the first Monday of each month for inspection by 
the agent of the board, that he may see they are kept in a clean 
condition, and are properly marked with the owner's name and 
number. 

Ashes. 

For several years past the ashes have been removed by this 
department with teams owned and men hired by the city, under a 
competent superintendent, who also superintends the collection 
of house offal. 

An average of tw^enty-eight men, with seventeen horses, 
thirteen carts, and four wagons for the collection of waste paper, 
has been employed in the work. 

The collections are made weekly, as follows : — 

Monday in district one. 

Tuesday " two. 

Wednesday " three. 

Thursday " four. 

Friday " five. 

Saturday " six. 

MONDAY, DISTRICT NO. 1. 

Comprises the entire area extending easterly to the cities of Boston- 
and Cambridge, from a line drawn across Somerville, commencing on- 
Mystic avenue, and extending through Cross street, Central square, Med- 
ford street, Washington street, Prospect street, Webster avenue, Tre- 
mont street to the Cambridge line and including collection on both sides 
of the above-named streets along the division line described. 

TUESDAY, DISTRICT NO. 2. 

Comprises the entire area extending westerly from the previously- 
described district number 1 to a line drawn across the city, commencing 
on Mystic avenue, and extending through Wheatland street, across 
Broadway, through Walnut street, and extending across Bow street and 
Somerville avenue, through Hawkins street, Washington street. Perry 
street, Wyatt street, Concord avenue, crossing Beacon street to the 
Cambridge line, and including collection on both sides of the above- 
named streets along the division line described. 

WEDNESDAY, DISTRICT NO. 3. 

Comprises the entire area extending westerly from the previously- 
described district number 2, to a line drawn across the city, commencing 
at the Medford boundary line at Main street, and extending easterly 
along said Main street, across Broadway, through Sycamore street^ 



HEALTH DEPAKTMENT. 259^ 

thence easterly on Highland avenue, through School street, thence west- 
erly on Somerville avenue, through Dane street and Washington streeu 
to the Cambridge line, and including the collection on both sides of the- 
above-named streets along the division line described. 

THURSDAY, DISTRICT NO. 4. 

Comprises the entire area extending westerly from the previously- 
described district number 3, to a line drawn across the city, commencing 
at the Medford line at Magoun square, and extending on Medford street 
to Lowell street, thence easterly on Somerville avenue and through Park 
street to the Cambridge line, and including the collection on both sides 
of the above-named streets along the division line described. 

FRIDAY, DISTRICT NO. 5. 

Comprises the entire area extending westerly from the previously- 
described district number 4, to a line drawn across the city, commencing 
on Broadway, and extending through Willow avenue to the Cambridge 
line, and including the collection on both sides of the above-named streets 
along the division line described. 

SATURDAY, DISTRICT NO. 6. 

Comprises the entire area extending westerly from Willow avenue 
to the Medford, Arlington, and Cambridge lines. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR COLLECTION OF ASHES 

AND OFFAL. 

Ashes must be put in suitable receptacles not larger than an ordinary 
flour barrel, and must be kept free from all other refuse matter. 

House offal or garbage must be kept free from all other refuse mat- 
ter, and in suitable vessels. 

All other refuse, such as paper, rags, excelsior, straw, mattresses^ 
old clothes, pasteboard boxes, carpets, etc., must be kept free from ashes 
and garbage, and placed in suitable packages or barrels to prevent being 
scattered in handling. 

All ashes and refuse matter for removal must be placed on the outer 
edge of the sidewalk, on or before seven o'clock in the morning of the 
day when the collection is to be made. 

Earth, gravel, bricks, mortar, stones, lime, plaster, cement, concrete, 
or refuse material from repairs or construction of buildings will not be 
removed by this department. 

The department will remove tree trimmings, vine cuttings, and yard' 
cleanings during the spring and summer months. 

Employees of this department are not allowed to enter cellars, 
cellar-ways, bulkheads, or areas for the removal of ashes or offal. 

Disposal of City Offal. 

How to dispose of the city's ofifal in the most expeditious, 
sanitary, and profitable manner has always been a perplexing 
question. For many years garbage was supposed to have no 
value, and the city was obliged to pay for its removal ; but as its 
use as a food for swine became recognized, its worth was appre- 
ciated, and a contract was made for its disposal without expense 
to the city. The demand for it increased, and a contract was 



-1)0 ANNUAL KEPOKTS. 

later made by which the city received a financial compensation. 
The last contract was made in 1900 for a period of five years, and 
the city was to receive the sum of $1,100 annually. The contract 
expired April 1, 1905, and this board determined, after careful 
investigation and deliberation, that the city's offal could be much 
more profitably disposed of by establishing a plant where it could 
be sold directly to customers. 

Necessary buildings were constructed by recommendation 
■of his honor the mayor April 5, 1905, on the city's land adjacent 
to the health department stables, and the sale of the offal at this 
place has continued during the last nine months of the year. 
During this time the amount received has been $4,549.86, while 
the added expense of handling it, exclusive of the cost of install- 
ing the plant, has been $470, leaving a net income for the nine 
months of $4,079.86. 

Since the first few weeks when the new system was getting 
into running order, the demand has equaled the supply, and ^he 
ofifal has been disposed of as fast as it has been collected, and in 
a sanitary and satisfactory manner. The force employed con- 
sists of twenty-three regular men, with eleven horses and eleven 
wagons. 

Stables. 

Under the provisions of sections 69 and 70 of the revised 
laws of 1902, seventeen petitions for licenses to erect and use 
stables were received and disposed of as follows : — 

Number granted . • 8 

Number refused 8 

Number referred to board of 1906 .... 1 

Board of Infants. 

Eight parties, whose applications were first approved by this 
board, have been licensed by the state board of charity to care for 
sixteen children, in this city, under the provisions of chapter 83 
of the revised laws of 1902. 

Deaths. 

There were 968 deaths and sixty stillbirths in the city during 
•the year, as specified in the following table, which shows an in- 
crease of deaths over the previous year of four : — 

Deaths at Somerville hospital during the year . 53 

Deaths at Cherry-street hospital .... 2 

Deaths at home for aged poor (Highland avenue), 51 

Deaths at home for aged (Grand View avenue) . 1 

Deaths at City home 2 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



261 



DEATHS BY AGES. 



Ages. 



Under one 
One to two . 
Two to three. 
Three to four 
Four to five . 
Five to ten . 
Ten to fifteen 
Fifteen to twenty 
Twenty to thirty 
Thirty to forty 
Forty to fifty 
Fifty to sixty 
Sixty to seventy 
Seventy to eighty 
Eighty to ninety 
Ninety and over 



Total 



Total. 



157 

23 

10 

13 

11 

29 

9 

17 

67 

68 

80 

98 

132 

172 

74 



Male. 

76 

14 

4 

9 

10 

17 

5 

9 

28 

33 

31 

48 

74 

70 

21 

4 

453 



Female. 

81 

9 

6 

4 

1 
12 

4 

8 
39 
35 
49 
50 
58 
102 
53 

4 

515 



Of the stillborn, 32 were males and 28 females. 



ft 



2ij2 



ANNUAL EEPOKTS. 



Mortality in Somerville in 1905. 



















1^ 




1^ 




>, 


t 














rO 




^ 


1) 


13 

S 


3 




< 




0) 

c 

3 
•—I 


'3 


3 

<5 


h 
a 


o 
u 

o 




(LI 
U 

Q 



I. General Diseases. 

{A. Epidemic Diseases.) 

Scarlet fever . 
Diphtheria . . £ . 
Typhoid fever . 
Erysipelas . . 
Cholera morbus ;'. 
Dysentery . .^. 
La grippe . . * . 

{^B.'JDther General Diseases.) 

Septicaemia . . 

Rheumatism . . 

Pernicious Anaemia 

Chlorosis 

Cancer 

Tumor 

Leukaemia 

Diabetes 

Syphilis ' . 

Tuberculosis 

Tubercular meningitis 

Exophthalmic goiter 

II. Diseases of the Nervous 
System. 

Meningitis . 
Apoplexy 
Paralysis 
Brain diseases 
Convulsions 
Neuritis . 
Spinal disease 
Hemiplegia . 
Epilepsy 
Myelitis . . 
Eclampsia . 

III. Diseases of the Circula- 

tory System, 

Heart disease 

Endocarditis 

Myocarditis 

Pericarditis 

Angina pectoris 

Cyanosis 

IV. Diseases of the Respira- 

tory System. 

Pneumonia . . . 
Bronchitis . . 
Hemorrhage . . 
Asthma .... 
Pulmonary oedema 
Emphysema . . 



12 



12 



14 
2 



4 
17 
9 
7 
1 

10 
17 



3 

5 
7 
1 

52 
5 
1 
5 
1 

84 
8 
1 



16 
64 
18 
5 
6 
1 
3 
9 
4 
2 
4 



82 
6 

13 
'2 
6 
1 



127 
31 
2 
6 
8 
1 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



263 



mortality; IN SOMERVILLE IN 1905. — Concluded. 





u 

a 

s 
c 

I—* 


u 




< 


>» 

a 

S 


0) 

c 

3 
<— » 


1—, 


3 

M 

3 


B 

a, 


C 

X 







X 

e 

V 

>■ 



ii 

X 

S 

V 

u 

Q 


1 



H 


V. Diseases of the Digi 
System. 
Colitis 


JSTIVE 

.' .* '. i' 

'. '. .' '3' 
.' '. '. i 

■Uri- 

. . . 2 

'. '. '. 5 


"2* 
"2" 
' 1 


'2' 
1 

■'i' 


.... 


i' 

1 


1 

2 

1 

"i' 


1 

"i* 

10 


4 

"3" 

6 


1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
2 








7 


Gastritis 










9 


Peritonitis 

Diarrhoea 

Cholera infantum . . . 


'2 


1 
1 


.... 


5 

6 

22 

3 


Ptomaine poisoning . 


















2 


.... 

1 

.... 


"i" 

1 
1 


"3* 
1 

1 

"2 


"2 


1 
7 












1 


Enteritis 


8 


2 


4 


1 




28 
3 


Intestinal obstruction . 
Appendicitis .... 


"1 
"1 

2 
1 
5 

1 


i" 


"2 


.... 


1 
2 




' 1* 


6 

7 
6 










2 


VJ. Diseases of Genito 
NARY System. 

Bright's disease .... 

Cystitis 

Nephritis 


2 
2 
6 

"i' 

"i* 

2 

1 


3 

1 
9 

1 
1 


2 
'2 

1 


1 
1 

2 

1 


1 
1 

7 

1 


"3 
1 


5 
2 
1 


1 

1 
5 

1 


"i' 

5 

1 
1 


ii 


14 

9 

63 


VI I. Childbirth. 
Childbirth 


. . 1 


9 


Viri. Diseases 

Abscess .... 
Eczema .... 


OF T 


HE S 


KIN. 

'. * 1 

omo- 

. . 1 


5 
1 


Erythema . . . 




















1 


Gangrene . . . 




1 


1 
1 


1 


1 
.... 


1 
1 








7 


Ulcer .... 








1 


IX. Diseases of the Loc 
TOR System. 
Ostitis 








1 


X. Malformations. 
Hydrocephalus .... 






1 




1 
1 

1 




4 
5 

7 
2 


Malformation 


. . 3 












XI. Early Infancy. 
Inanition 


. . 1 














3 




Atelectasis 


enital 
. . 4 


1 

6 

1 


1 
2 


1 
5 

2 






1 


Asphyxia neonatorum . . . 










1 


Premature birth and cong 
debility 


2 


1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

.... 


5 
1 


4 

2 


2 

1 


1 
4 


1 
3 


32 

18 

2 


XII. Old Age. 
Old age 

XIII. Violence. 
Alcoholism 


• . 1 

. . "i* 
. . 1 

'. '. "i' 


Drowning . 
Railroad .... 
Suicide .... 








.... 




i" 


1 
"1" 


.... 


.... 

1 
.... 




' i 


i 


2 

7 
3 


Burning 


.... 


1 
"2 






2 






4 


Poisoning .... 








1 


Fracture of skull . . 








3 


Gas poisoning 


1 

57 

6 














2 


Concussion of brain . 
Bullet wound . . . 


82 
4 


107 
6 


80 
3 


76 
4 


86 
4 


.... 

82 
6 




1 






1 
1 




72 
5 


71 
4 


88 
4 


77 

6 




Total 


90 


368 
60 


Stillborn 


8 







Population ( estimated ) 70 OOO 

Death rate per thousand 13 8 



^^^ ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Social Relations of Decedents. 

Married .... qqa 

Single gf 

Widow ... • loi 

Widower ..''■* ^S 

Divorced ■.'.'.'.'.',''' o 

Unknown " f 

'^°t^^ "968 

Nativity of Decedents. 

Somerville ^ ^ .200 

Massachusetts .'!'*'* 237 

Other New England states ...'.*.*.'** 162 

Other states !.'!*" 34 

Canada .*.'*** 74 

England, Scotland, and Wales ....... 38 

Ireland .... ^ 

it^^y •'''......'.. 11 

Norv^ay and Sweden q 

Russia . ' 5 

Other countries ] ' g 

Unknown ' 2 

Total . . 968 

Nativity of Parents of Decedents. 

Father Mother 

Somerville . . . . . . . , . . . . 11 21 

Massachusetts 171 173 

Other New England states .* 167 163 

Other states 29 18 

Canada and provinces 126 144 

England, Scotland, and Wales 63 52 

Ireland 294 301 

Italy . 14 12 

Norway and Sweden 18 13 

Russia 6 6 

Other countries 26 21 

Unknown 43 44 

Total 968 968 

Of the parents of the stillborn, 25 fathers and 31 mothers were na- 
tives of the United States, and 35 fathers and 29 mothers were of foreign 
birth. 

Diseases Dangerous to tlie Public Health. 

This board has adjudged that the diseases known as small- 
pox, scarlet fever, diphtheria, membraneous croup, typhus fever, 
typhoid fever, chicken-pox, pulmonary tuberculosis, cerebro- 
spinal meningitis, and cholera are infectious, or contagious, and 
dangerous to the public health and safety within the meaning of 
the statutes. Physicians are required to report immediately to 
the board every case of either of these diseases and all cases of 
measles coming under their care, and postal cards conveniently 
printed and addressed are supplied to them for the purpose. On 
receipt of a card from a physician, the superintendent of 
schools, the principal of the school in the district in which the 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 265 

patient resides, and the librarian of the public library are notified, 
and state board of health. 

Scarlet Fever. — One hundred thirty-seven cases of scarlet 
fever have been reported during the year, four of which resulted 
fatally. In 1904 there were one hundred nineteen cases, three of 
which resulted fatally. 

Diphtheria. — One hundred and ninety-nine cases of diph- 
theria have been reported during the year, seventeen of which 
were fatal. In 1904 there were three hundred and seventy-one 
cases, fourteen of which proved fatal. Anti-toxin has been pro- 
vided by the state board of health, and placed by this board in 
central locations for use by physicians in cases where people are 
unable to purchase the same. Culture tubes for diphtheria and 
sputum bottles for suspected tuberculosis have been obtainable at 
the same stations. 

Warning cards are used in dealing with scarlet fever and 
with diphtheria, and the premises are fumigated by the use of 
the formaldehyde gas regenerator, immediately after the termi- 
nation of the case. An inspection is made by the agent of the 
board of the premises where diphtheria is reported, and all sani- 
tary defects discovered are required tO' be remedied as soon as 
possible. 

Tuberculosis. — Fifty-three cases of tuberculosis have been re- 
ported during the year. There were eighty-four deaths from this 
disease. 

Typhoid Fever. — Fifty-two cases of typhoid fever have been 
reported during the year, nine of which have proved fatal. In 
1904 there were ninety-six cases reported, eleven of which were 
fatal. 

Typhus Fever, Cholera. — No cases of typhus fever or cholera 
have been reported the past year. 

Smallpox. — No cases of smallpox have been reported during 
the year. 

Number of cases of scarlet fever and diphtheria for which houses 

were placarded . . . 336 

Number of premises disinfected by agent 572 

Disinfection. 

It will be seen by the foregoing figures that, in addition to 
the 336 premises infected with scarlet fever or diphtheria, 236 
other premises were disinfected. Thirty-four disinfections were 
made at the request of attending physicians whose patients had 
been ill with typhoid fever or cancer. One hundred and sixteen 
schoolrooms were disinfected for scarlet fever or diphtheria, and 
eighty-six premises for tuberculosis, in compliance with the regu- 
lations passed by this board. 

Many library books have also been disinfected, and quan- 
tities of infected bedding and other material have been 
burned. 



23t) 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLES. 



The prevalence of scarlet fever, diphtheria, and typhoid 
fever in the city during- the several months of the year 1905 is 
shown by the following table, and in the table next following is 
given the number of deaths from these three diseases, by months, 
during the last ten years : — 



Scarlet Fever, Diphtheria, and Typhoid Fever Reported in 1905. 





SCA 


RLET Fever. 


Diphtheria. 


Typhoid Fever. 


Months. 


-6 


o 


^i 


nd 


o 




'6 


O 


S)2 






I, <" 




lA 1) 


1- <" 


ojx; 


tA 1) 


I- f 


(«•£ 




^fe 


-2 rt 


s| 


rt 2 




5 <u 


« 2 


-2 rt 








1" 




Pi 








l« 


Ah o 


January . , . 


6 






35 


3 


8.6 








February . 






7 


i 


14.3 


21 


2 


9.5 


6 




. . . . " 


March . 








16 


1 


6,3 


11 


• • . • 




1 


.... 




April 








10 






18 


1 


5.6 


2 


1 


50.6 


May . . 








7 






15 


1 


6.7 


5 




.... 


June. . 








6 


i 


16.4 


9 


1 




2 


2 


IdO.O 


July . . 








4 




• • . . 


1 






3 


1 


33 3 


August . 








7 


i 


14.3 


4 




■ • • • 


10 






September 








7 






22 


i 


4.6 


10 






October 








16 


. • • • 




21 


2 


9.5 


9 


i 


11. i 


November 








19 







19 


3 


15.8 


3 


3 


100.0 


December 








32 


. .. 




23 


3 


13.1 


1 


1 


100.0 


Total. . . . 


137 


4 


2.9 


199 


17 


8.6 


52 


9 


17.3 



Deaths from Scarlet Fever, Diphtheria, and Typhoid Fever 
in the Last Ten Years. 





Scarlet Fever. 


Diphtheria. 


Typhoid Fever. 


Months. 
































































fO 


r~- 




rTi 


<— ■ 


.-1 


~i 


CO 


^ 


11-1 


fO 


t-- 


rf) 


3; 


o 


_ 


fN 


CO 


rt< 


lO 


CD 


t^ 


°P 


C3 


o 


^ 


r^ 


fO 


•* 


iCl 




rr, 


IT\ 




rr, 






o 


S 




OS 


-TJ 


m 


05 




^ 


O 


o 


O 


o 








OJ 


o 






_ 




o 




rm 


rf) 




00 


Ci 


^ 


03 


Ci 


C3 


00 


.TO 


00 


OtJ 


C5 


CJ3 


C5 


C5 


05 


05 




















Oi 




tH 


iH 


i-( 


-H 


" 


tH 




T-( 


tH 


1-1 


T-l 


1-1 


tH 


^H 


t-H 


.-1 


iH 


i-H 


r-l 


1-1 




i-H 


















January . . 
















4 






12 




2 


1 


7 


10 


4 


1 


3 


3 


2 




2 


1 




1 




3 


1 




February . . 










1 


4 


1 


2 


i 


1 


5 


2 




2 


1 


4 




2 


3 


2 






2 


1 


1 


2 




1 






March . . 


] 


2 








1 






1 


1 


3 


4 






5 


2 




3 






i 








1 




i 


1 


i 




April . . . 




2 






2 












5 


5 


1 




2 


, , 


1 


, , 


1 


1 


2 


1 


2 














1 


May . . . 






















4 


7 


1 


1 


5 


3 


2 


2 


3 


1 


1 


1 




1 








1 


i 




June . . . 
















1 




1 


2 


1 






3 


1 


.. 


1 




1 


2 








, , 


, , 


i 




1 


2 


July . . . 




2 


















5 


1 






4 


, , 


1 


, , 


1 




1 


2 




1 




1 


1 




1 


1 


August . . 




















1 


2 


3 


3 




.. 


2 


1 


2 


1 




2 


2 




2 


i 


1 






2 


.. 


September . 






















2 


7 


.. 


, , 


9 


1 


, , 


2 




i 


6 


2 




2 


1 


3 


1 


2 




.. 


October . . 


2 








1 












1 


5 




1 


6 


3 


2 


2 




2 


3 


2 




1 


3 


1 


1 


2 




1 


November . 










2 




i 








7 


8 


2 


1 


3 


2 


3 


2 




3 


5 


1 




3 


2 


. , 






3 


3 


December . 


1 






3 


1 


5 


1 

3 


3 
10 


1 

3 


4 


6 
54 


1 
44 


1 
10 


5 
11 


4 
49 


1 

29 


5 

19 


2 
19 


2 
14 


3 

17 


1 

26 


11 


11 


3 
15 


9 


3 

12, 


1 

6 


10 


1 
11 


1 


Total . . 


5 


6 





3 


7 


9 



i 

I 



HEALTH DEPAKTMENT. 267 

Contagious Hospital. 

With the growth of a city there is an increasing- HabiHty to 
the prevalence of contagious diseases, and the problem of con- 
trolHng these affections and preventing serious epidemics be- 
comes a difficult one to solve. It is a well-recognized fact that if 
persons suffering with these diseases can be properly isolated, the 
danger of the spread of the contagion is averted. In many cases 
occurring in private homes and apartment houses, anything like 
suitable isolation and necessary care are impossible, and unless 
the patient can be removed, the other members of the family, or 
the members of several families are more or less exposed to the 
infection. 

The large cities have long maintained hospitals in which 
persons suffering with these diseases could be treated, and many 
•of the smaller cities have recently established such hospitals. 
The city of Somerville purchased the Russell estate at the corner 
of North street and Broadway, West Somerville, on May 17, 
1901, for the purpose of establishing a contagious hospital. For 
some reason nothing further was done until a year ago, when 
the agitation in favor of the project was renewed, and later on an 
appropriation of $5,000 was made by the board of aldermen for 
the purpose of converting the Russell house in its present loca- 
tion into a contagious hospital, the balance of the land having 
been transferred to the overseers of the poor department by the 
board of aldermen. 

Work was begun early in the fall, and has progressed so 
rapidly that the building is nearly ready for occupancy. The in- 
terior of the old building has been entirely remodeled, and an 
addition has been built containing rooms for the matron and 
•nurses, besides a kitchen, laundry, isolation ward, and serving 
rooms. The first floor of the main building will be used for diph- 
theria patients, and cases of scarlet fever will be treated on the 
second floor. The rooms and halls are so arranged that the two 
-diseases will be kept entirely separate. 

There are two large wards, in which several beds can be 
placed, and smaller rooms for one or two patients. Everything 
has been so planned that the building is well adapted for the pur- 
pose intended. Forty or more patients can be accommodated at 
one time, and the facilities for taking care of them will be of the 
best and most modern character. 

Here patients may be taken when proper isolation or care 
are impossible at home, and thus will the prevalence of these dis- 
eases be better controlled and the public health be better pro- 
tected. 

Bacteriological Department. 

The work of this department was performed by Frank L. 
Morse, M. D., whose report is appended to this report: — 



2 1^8 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Specimens will be received at the laboratory at the city half 
daily, including Sunday, at any time, and they will be examined 
and reported upon the morning following their reception. 

SPECiriENS AND ANTI-TOXIN. 

Outfits for specimens for tuberculosis, diphtheria, typhoid 
fever and malaria, and diphtheria anti-toxin and vaccine lymph 
may be obtained at the laboratory and at the following places : — 

Charles H. Crane, 154 Perkins street. 

Will B. Fitts, 173 Washington street. 

Milton H. Plummer, 25 Union square. 

Fred W. Gay, 524 Somerville avenue. 

Hart Brothers, 263 Highland avenue. 

Percy A. Hall, 2 Studio building, Davis square. 

Herbert E. Bowman, 529 Medford street, Magoun squares 

Eugene B. Carpenter, 10 Broadway. 

Julius E. Richardson, 310 Broadway. 

After the specimen is collected, it must be taken or sent 
directly to the laboratory at the city hall. 

Districts. 

A map showing the health districts was printed with the 
annual reports for 1904 and previous years. This division of dis- 
tricts was made by the board of health of 1878, and has since 
remained unchanged. 

A record has been kept from year to year, of the number of 
deaths, the death rate per thousand, the prevalence of dangerous 
diseases, and the number of nuisances abated in these several dis- 
tricts, and is continued in the following tables, and in the table 
near the beginning of this report. 

The estimated population in the several districts was origi- 
nally based on the number of assessed polls in each, and upon 
the population of the entire city ; the ratio of polls to population 
being presumed to be the same in all the districts. Substantially 
the same method of estimating the population has been con- 
tinued, the census of every fifth year being taken as a basis for 
calculation. 

The number of dwellings and of assessed polls May 1. 1905, 
has been obtained from the assessors' books. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



269 



28- 

sr 



«D?OAOOO«OOOOOOOQO 

oooooo«c>coo«o 



I 


n 1905 




> 


d 


^ 


<: 
re 

"1 


n 


o 

c 








cr; 
n 


3 


!U 


or; 


o 


3 




s 


fU 






I" 




, 


n 






P* 






O. 






^ 


• 


' 


rt> 
























a 




, 


cr? 




• 






o 
** 

D 
P 

s* 

on 



m 
fi 

a* 

O 
w' 

o* 

o 

c 
5' 

S* 

r 
p 

en 

3 

•< 

n 
P 

on 



Number of 
Deaths. 



Rate 
per 1,000. 





_» 


Oi 


CO 


a 


o 


QO 


^ 


Ci 


an 




CO 


o 


M 


> 



OcOCOCOtCC^'COOOCnQO 



Number of 
Deaths. 



Rate 
per 1,000. 



cnc;»4».i*kC0O5Oso5C5-a 



Number of 
Deaths. 

Rate 
per 1,000. 







Vt 


to 




•^ 


M 


CO 


bi 


^ 


m 


> 



Number of 
Deaths. 



-504^tCI-'iX>«D-^-l«0 



Rate 
per 1,000. 















cn 


-31 




GO 


or 


^^ 


M 


OC 




> 



>-.|-'l-»i-'»-»tOl-'l-»l-'h- 

CnOiCOD-itOfO^OO 
000i>-'4i.00CD0'i*»OO 



Number of 
Deaths. 



Rate 
per 1,000. 





JO 


Ot 


^ 


Ol 


>-q 


t(^ 


l-» 








> 


o 


O 


03 



ooo4-ooc<3rf^c;ic;i05 



Number of 
Deaths. 



Rate 
per 1,000. 





I-' 


o 


to 




—1 


-^ 


w 


to 


CO 


g! 


> 



Number of 
Deaths. 



"-ai-'toocD^to^i-toco 



Rate 
per 1,000. 







en 


s 


pr 
-^ 


00 


o 


»(^ 






> 



>-'l-'-lC;n^fcOI-'0»f>.05 



Number of 
Deaths. 



Rate 
per 1,000. 







»f^ 




Or 


00 


Oi 


to 


to 




-1 

o 


> 



OOtOCnCOOOitkasOtOCJ 



rfi.OtOtOH-'tOI-'tOODCO 



Number of 
Deaths. 



Rate 
per 1,000. 







>(^ 


•q 


C" 


00 
CO 


^ 


> 


OC 


<y> 


® 



X 



Number of 
Deaths. 



Rate 
per 1,000. 







>f^ 


>»>■ 
w 


>t^ 


o 


Ol 




-1 


05 


»-' 


> 



X 



to CO CO 
OS o> c:n 



00 00 CO 00 00 00 CO 

X- CO 05 O 06 Oi to 
C »-' -^ I-* O CO *». 



Number of 
Deaths. 



>fkt^»f^cocoo>eoc;ic;i<~4 



Rate 
per 1,000. 






270 



ANNUAL EEPOKTS. 



Table Showing the Five Principal Causes of Death in Somerville in» 
1905, with the Number and Rate in Each District. 



• 










Heart 












Pneumonia. 


Tuberculosis. 


Disease. 


Apop 


LEXY. 


Nephritis. 






d 




(i 




d, 




d, 




D. 


Districts. 




S;S 




%^ 




fcc2 




j^^ 








o <«• 


0-v« 


O m 


&-y_ 


° <«• 


p-^ 


^ J, 


D.u_ 


<= («• 


""^iM 




*-^ 


U O 


^A 


k. o 


^A 


k. o 


\~ r: 


>~ O 


"-i: 


1- O 




D 73 


^§ 


J3 rt 


^§ 


(u -is 


^§ 




1J .-, 


(U-t! 


li 




i« 




|P 


3o 


iQ 


c ® 

3o 




Eo 


io 




% 


"A^ 


^ 


1^- 


;zi 


:z;- 


I?-, 


:z;2 


1^ 


^2 


I 


16 


23.4 


20 


29.2 


15 


21.9 


10 


14.6 


8 


11.7 


II 


8 


11.5 


6 


7.1 


T 


10. 1 


5 


7.1 


6 


8.7 


Ill 


14 


26.3 


8 


15.1 


9 


16.9 


6 


11.3 


5 


9.4 


IV 


15 


27.1 


13 


23.6 


9 


16.3 


4 


7.2 


5 


9.1 


V 


20 


12.9 


8 


5.2 


10 


6.5 


11 


7.1 


10 


6.5 


VI 


17 


15.8 


9 


8.4 


9 


8.4 


7 


6.5 


7 


6.5 


VII 


11 


21.8 


5 


9.9 


8 


15.8 


8 


15.8 


9 


17.8 


VIII 


6 


12.9 


6 


12.9 


7 


14.9 


5 


10.8 


3 


6.5 


IX 


]1 


22.8 


5 


10.4 


3 


6.2 


5 


10.4 


6 


12.4 


X 


9 


19.6 


5 


10.9 


5 


10.9 


3 


6.6 


4 


8.7 


Total .... 


127 


1S.2 


84 


12.0 


82 


11.7 


64 


9.1 


63 


9.0 



Table of Scarlet Fever, Diphtheria, and Typhoid Fever in 
Each District in 1905. 



Districts. 



Scarlet Fever. 



,P«^ 



Pu. 



U 



I. 

II. 
III. 
IV. 

V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

IX. 

X. 

Total 



o 
■So 



20 


1 


2.92 


17 


1 


2.44 


5 


, . 


0.94 


19 


1 


3.45 


15 




0.98 


18 




1.67 


18 




3.56 


10 




2.14 


6 




1.24 


9 


i 

4 


1.96 


137 


1.96 



0.15 
0.14 

0.18 



0.22 



0.06 



Diphtheria. 



,f^ Ji 



U 





U, 




O 




eu 




l-i u-< 




1) o 


Ifl 


f^o 


.^ 


03 O 


rt 


4) O 




Wt-I 


^ (-) 


O 



25 
9 
31 
33 
17 
31 
1 
19 
10 
13 



199 



1 


3.65 


3 


1.29 


1 


5.83 


1 


5.97 


3 


1.11 


3 


2.79 


1 


2.18 


1 


4.07 


1 


1.04 


2 
17 


2.84 


2.84 



a. 
o 

& o 
^§ 



0.15 
0.43 
0.19 
0.18 
0.19 
0.29 
0.19 
0.22 
0.21 
0.44 



0.24 



Typhoid Fever. 



u 





d 




o 




O. 




^ Ul 




D O 




<« o 


rt 


i> O 




rt — 


« 


CJ 



6 
4 
6 
2 
6 
14 
3 

'2 
9 



52 



P.O 

•So 



2 


0.88 




0.58 


1 


1.13 


1 


0.36 


1 


0.38 


1 


1.31 


•• 


0.59 


' • 


0.4i 


3 


1.96 


9 


0.74 



0.29 

0.19 
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272 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Undertakers. 

Under the provisions of section 44 of chapter 78 of the re- 
vised laws of 1902, eighteen persons have been duly licensed as 
undertakers. 

Examiners of Plumbers. 

The public statutes provide for a board of examiners of 
plumbers, consisting of a chairman of the board of health, the 
inspector of buildings, and an expert at plumbing, to be ap- 
pointed by the board of health. This board appointed Duncan 
C. Greene, the inspector of plumbing, to fill the place of expert. 
The number of licenses granted will be found in the report of the 
inspector of buildings. 

Financial Statement. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriation $39,500 00 

Receipts: — 

Milk fees 115 10 

Permit fees 66 00 

Emanuel Zetterman, care of Gustave 

Zetterman 8 00 

City of Boston, care of Thane family . 16 92 

City of Boston, care of Lucy Nuro . . 315 00 

$40,021 02 

Amounts transferred: — 

To health department, collection of ashes 

and offal . . . . . . . $24,000 00 

To public buildings construction, health 

department 1,200 00 

25,200 00 

Total credit . . . . . . . . . $14,821 02 

DEBIT. 

Salaries $4,233 28 

Wagons, sleds, etc. 39 11 

Tools and repairing same ... 74 40 

Harnesses and horse clothing ... 5 65 

Horses and horse doctoring .... 8 65 

Horseshoeing 24 00 

Vaccine virus 6 65 

Burying dead animals 133 50 

Office expenses 33 85 

Books, stationery, printing and postage . 252 05 

Bacteriological laboratory .... 2 67 

Board of agent's horse 275 86 

Telephones o 

Care of contagious diseases .... 1,431 12 

Incidentals 164 76 

Total debit ...... "^ ^ ' $6>779 04 

Balance unexpended $8,041 98 



A 



i 



HEALTH DEPAETMENT. 273 

Health Department^ Collection of Ashes and Offal. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriation $24,000 00 

Receipts: — 
A. M. Prescott, sale of horse . . . 30 00 

Hannibal S. Pond, city offal to April 1, 

1905 275 00 

Sundry persons, city offal April 1 to De- 
cember 31 . . _ . . . . . 4,549 86 
Transferred from Highways Maintenance 

account 4,000 00 

Total credit $32,854 86 

DEBIT. 

Salary of superintendent $1,200 00 

Collecting ashes 17,858 21 

Collecting offal 14,945 25 

Preparing shed, constructing driveway, 

building fence, laying water main, etc., 912 33 

Stable expenses 1,458 00 

Wagons, sleds, etc 519 05 

Extending roof at offal shed and manure pit 

at stable .^ 278 53 

Tools and repairing same .... 93 85 

Washstand, etc., at offal shed ... Ill 67 

Hose cock, etc., at offal shed .... 88 05 . 

Harnesses and horse clothing . . . 431 06 

Horses and horse doctoring .... 624 50 

Board of superintendent's horse . . . 280 20 

Horseshoeing 770 47 

Hay and grain 4,276 69 

Incidentals 240 79 

Total debit . .• $44,083 65 

Amount overdrawn $11,228 79 

Amount overdrawn, health department, col- 
lection of ashes and offal . . . $11,228 79 

Amount unexpended, Health Department 

account 8,041 98 

Net amount expended above original 
appropriation $3,186 81 

Allen F. Caepentee, Chairman, 
Edmund S. Spaeeow, 
Wesley T. Lee, M. D., 

Board of Health. 



REPORT OF BACTERIOLOGIST. 



Somerville, January 10, 1906. 
To the Board of Health of the City of Somerville :— 

Gentlemen,— I herewith present the report of the bacteriol- 
ogist for the year 1905. 

During the latter part of December, 1902, in accordance with 
your vote, a laboratory was established at the city hall, and regu- 
lar bacteriological examinations were commenced upon January 
1, 1903, which have been continued during the past year. 

During the year 1905 792 examinations were made of cul- 
tures for the diphtheria organism, 162 examinations made of 
sputum from patients suspected of having tuberculosis, and 
seventy-eight examinations to detect the Widal reaction in 
typhoid fever. 

With the beginning of 1903, your board established regula- 
tions, which required, in cases of diphtheria, that no patient 
should be released from quarantine until two consecutive nega- 
tive cultures had been obtained from the patient, one by the at- 
tending physician and one by a physician representing the board, 
thus making the work more extensive than had been previously 
required. 

On May 1 of the present year, in response to a request from 
the Somerville Medical Society, representing the physicians of 
the city, the taking of the first release culture w^as made optional 
with the attending physician, and if so requested, the physician 
representing the board took all of the release cultures. In addi- 
tion, it was also voted that all patients ill with scarlet fever should 
be examined by a physician designated by the board, before re- 
leasing the family from quarantine, and the bacteriologist was 
instructed to perform both of these duties, and was made an agent 
of the board of health. Since this time 209 visits have been made 
for the purpose of taking release cultures in cases of diphtheria, 
and 126 visits to examine patients convalescent from scarlet fever, 
it being necessary to inspect forty-five patients ill with the latter 
disease a second and sometimes third time before releasing them 
from quarantine, on account of the process of desquamation still 
being present. 

Culture stations were also established at four different parts 
of the city, which were later increased to nine in number, to more 
generally accommodate the physicians of the city, at which places, 
in connection with the laboratory, culture outfits, diphtheria anti- 
toxin, typhoid fever outfits, vaccine lymph, and sputum bottles 
could be obtained. To avoid delay in the examination of speci- 
mens, it was required that all specimens should be sent to the 
laboratory at the city hall, thus obviating any delay through the 
culture stations. Cultures left at the city hall as late as midnight 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 27 5 

are placed in the incubator immediately, making it possible for a 
result to be obtained early the next morning. 

Diphtheria. — Seven hundred and ninety-two cultures have 
been examined for diphtheria, 346 being in males, and 446 in 
females. _ Diphtheria being a disease of children, 204 of these 
examinations have been made in children under five years of age, 
260 in those from five to ten years of age, 139 from ten to twenty,, 
and 170 in adults over twenty years. In nineteen cases the age 
of the patient was not stated. 'Two hundred and sixty-three ex- 
aminations were made for the diagnosis of the case, sixty-one 
proving positive, and 202 negative. Of the positive results, fif- 
teen were of cases in which the attending physician's diagnosis 
of diphtheria was confirmed, ten in which the clinical diagnosis 
was not diphtheria, and thirty-six in which no definite diagnosis 
was made. Of the 202 negative examinations, twenty-three were 
obtained in which the clinical diagnosis was diphtheria, seventy- 
six in which the diagnosis was not diphtheria, and 103 in which- 
no diagnosis had been made. 

Five hundred and twenty-five cultures were taken for release 
of patients from qiiarantine, 139 of which were positive, and 386 
negative. The importance of taking release cultures is demon- 
strated by these figures, these patients showing the presence of: 
the bacilli in the throat after the clinical evidence of the disease- 
had disappeared. In four examinations there was no growth; 
upon the serum tube. 

Tuberculosis. — One hundred and sixty-two examinations- 
have been made of sputum suspected of containing the tubercle 
bacillus, twenty-two of which were positive and 140 negative. 
In forty-nine cases a definite diagnosis of this disease had been 
made by the attending physician, but in thirty-eight of them the 
organism could not be detected. In the remainder of the cases, 
sixty-four were stated as not showing evidence of the disease, five 
being positive, and in forty-nine cases no statements were made 
giving information as to its character, six of which were positive. 
Sixty-nine were males and ninety-three females. Although 
printed directions accompany each outfit, telling how the speci- 
men should be obtained, it has not been unusual for specimens to- 
be sent to the laboratory containing only saliva from the mouth, 
w4th no excretion from the lungs or bronchial tubes. Physicians 
should be urged to give definite instructions to each patient,, 
relating to the collection of the sputum, for in some instances a 
negative report would mislead both physician and patient. Con- 
sumption to-day is recognized as an infectious disease, and all 
persons afflicted with it should be instructed in the modern 
methods for preventing its spread. In some cases this is not 
done by the attending physician, and during the past two years 
your board has required that this disease be reported to you, as 
other infectious diseases are, and that printed instructions and 
advice be sent to each patient ill with the disease. The decrease- 



276 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



in the death rate of consumption, and the cure of persons afflicted 
with it, is due to the improved and intelhgent manner with which 
cases are treated, and the prevention of further spread of the dis- 
ease is a subject which is of importance to all local boards of 
health. 

Typhoid Fever. — Seventy-eight examinations of the blood of 
patients suspected of having- typhoid fever have been made, 
twenty-six of which proved positive. In twelve cases a positive 
•diagnosis of this disease had been made by the attending physi- 
cian, in six cases it was stated not to be typhoid fever, and in the 
remainder no statement was made relating to the diagnosis. Of 
the negative results, one was diagnosed as typhoid, five were said 
not toi be typhoid, and in forty-four no diagnosis was made. 
Forty-five were males and thirty-three females. In two cases the 
^specimens were not satisfactory for examination. 

Summary for Three Years, 1903, 1904, 1905. 

Diphtheria Cultures. 

Age not No. 
No. examined Males Females 0-5 5-10 10-20 Over 20 stated growth 

1903 .... 817 387 430 282 199 125 185 26 5 

1904 ....1,429 629 800 537 400 231 261 34 29 

1905 .... 792 346 446 204 260 139 170 19 4 

For Diagnosis Clinical Diagnosis Diph. Clin. Diag. not Diph. Clin. Diag. not stated 
Positive Negative Positive Negative Positive Negative 

1903 360 56 35 11 122 27 109 

1904 406 72 37 11 96 59 131 

1905 263 15 23 10 76 36 103 

For Release 
Positive Negative 

1903 95 362 

1904 233 761 

1905 139 386 

sputum for Tuberculosis. , 

Clin. Diag. Tuberculosis 
No. Examined Males Females Positive Negative Positive Negative 

1903 137 Q6 71 26 111 15 21 

1904 ... 124 54 70 28 96 14 29 

1905 '.'. 162 69 93 22 140 11 38 

Clinical Diagnosis not Tuberculosis Clinical Diagnosis not stated 
Positive Negative Positive Negative 

190a 9 61 2 29 

190i 11 43 3 24 

1905 :::::::::::. 5 59 6 43 

Blood lor Typhoid Fever. ^^.^ ^.^^ ^^^^^.^ ^^^^^ 

No. Examined Males Females Positive Negative Positive Negative 

1903 . 72 39 33 27 45 18 7 

1904 76 53 23 32 44 18 4 

i905 :;:;.•.; 73 45 33 26 50 u 

Clinical Dia^sis^ot Typhoui Fev^ ^^^^^S^' ^.X' 

lonq 2 6 7 32 

\lf, 6 14 34 

1904 y K 14 44 

1905 1 5 14 i* 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frank L. Moese, 

Bacteriologist. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS AND PROVISIONS. 



Office of the Board of Health, > 
City Hai^i,, January i6, 1906. f 

To the Board of Health of the City of Somerville : — 

Gentlemen, — I herewith submit the report of the inspector 
of provisions and animals for the year ending 1905. 

The following is a statement of the number of animals killed 
during the year at the slaughtering establishments in the city : 
John P. Squire Corporation, Medford street, 561,251 swine; 
North Packing and Provision Company, Medford street, 650,629 
swine; New England Dressed Meat and Wool Companv, Med- 
ford street, 16,074 cattle, 64,039 calves, 254,628 sheep; Sturtevant 
& Haley Beef Supply Company, Somerville avenue, 6,663 cattle ; 
Henry Gunsenhiser, North street, 1,325 cattle, 560 calves. Total 
number of animals slaughtered during the year, 1,555,169. 

There are 107 cows and 158 swine kept in this city for do- 
mestic purposes. 

I have examined 2,181 horses in stables where contagious 
diseases were reported to exist. There were 27 horses killed for 
glanders, and 1 released. 

I have made 2,132 visits to stores and markets and inspected 
pedler carts from which fish, provisions, and produce were sold. 

I have made monthly inspections of all bakeries and barber 
shops through the city, and find them in good condition, 

I have inspected, condemned, and caused to be destroyed 
287 pounds of fresh beef, 314 pounds of corned beef, 11 cattle, 
1,163 pounds of veal, 327 pounds of fresh pork, 42 pounds of 
pickled pigs' feet, 614 pounds of fowl, 293 pounds of mutton, 19 
dozens of eggs, 379 pounds of haddock, 219 pounds of pollock, 
197 pounds of fresh cod, 117 pounds of sword fish, 312 mackerel, 
163 dozens of smelts, 71 pounds of salt fish, 93 pounds of halibut, 
71 lobsters, 4 gallons of oysters, 3 bushels of clams, 4 gallons of 
clams, 34 bushels of common potatoes, 24 bushels of sweet pota- 
toes, 14 barrels of yellow turnips, 5 barrels of white turnips, 3 
bushels of beets, 2 bushels of carrots, 11 bushels of onions, 23 
barrels of squash, 37 bushels of greens, 5 bushels of lettuce, 3 
dozen bunches of celery, 11 crates of grapes, 1,532 quarts of 
strawberries, 6 barrels of cranberries, 619 quarts of raspberries, 
321 dozen bananas, 19 boxes of oranges, 5 boxes of lemons, 6 
barrels of flour, 27 crates of melons, 293 loaves of bread, 63 pies, 
49 cakes, and performed other duties as the board of health re- 
quired. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Chakles M. Berry, 

Inspector. 



REPORT OF MILK INSPECTOR. 



Office of Milk Inspector, 
310 Broadway, Somerville, Mass. 

To ,the Board of Health : — 

Gentlemen, — I have the honor to submit the following re- 
port for the year ending December 31, 1905 :— 

The total number of samples collected and analyzed was . 768 

Samples brought to office 162 

Samples brought by citizens and complaint made . . 7 

Samples of cream 8 

Total 945 

The condition of the milk sold in this city has as a whole 
proved satisfactory, except for the condition I find in many 
stores, where it is handled and sold in a very unclean manner. 

I desire to recommend that a rule be passed to keep all milk 
in a separate iced tank, in all places where milk is retailed. 

I would recommend a rule having all milk kept at a tem- 
perature not exceeding fifty-five degrees Fahrenheit at any time 
while it is for sale. This temperature will prevent the develop- 
ment of bacteria to a great extent, and will, in my opinion, 
greatly assist in checking infantile diseases in the hot months, as 
well as preventing many intestinal troubles in adults arising from 
the large amount of milk used as food in the hot months. 

There has been a marked effort on the part of the majority 
of milkmen to sell cleaner and better milk, which is to be com- 
mended. 

I am glad to say I have found no milk containing preserva- 
tives this year. 

I have visited some of the stables and milk houses of men 
outside of Somerville, and find them in very bad condition ; this 
is in part owing to the lax or lack of inspection by the proper 
authorities in these towns, and think the aid of the state board 
of health should be asked. 

The stables and milk rooms in our city, with a few excep- 
tions, are in a good sanitary condition. 

I have issued to stores 100 hcenses, and to milk pedlers 129 
licenses, a total of 229. 

Paid the city treasurer $114.50 for the same, and sixty cents 
for stamps; total of $115.10. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 279 

Summary of prosecutions made during the year : — 

One milkman, selling milk below the standard; fined . . $15 00 

One milkman, selling milk below the standard; on file. 
One milkman, selling milk without a license; fined . . 30 00 

One milkman, selling milk without a license; on file 

(sickness). 
One milkman, selling milk without name on wagon; on file. 
One milkman, selling milk below the standard; fined . . 10 00 

One milkman, selling milk below the standard, second 

offence; fined . ' 

One milkman, selling milk below the standard; fined . 
One milkman, selling milk below the standard; on file. 
One storekeeper, selling milk below the standard; fined 
One storekeeper, selling milk below the standard; fined 
One storekeeper, selling milk below the standard; fined 
One storekeeper, selling milk below the standard; fined 
One storekeeper, selling milk below the standard; fined 
One storekeeper, selling milk below the standard; on file. 

Total amount of fines $295 00 

Days in court, eighteen ; one in superior. 

One storekeeper paid an appealed fine of $100 at superior 
court. 

I have one case of $100 fine waiting trial in superior court. 

This department needs about $250 worth of chemical appa- 
ratus for inspecting butter and vinegar. 

I repeat my statement of last year, that any citizen having 
any just complaint to make about their milk has a right to do so, 
and I invite them to do so at my office, which is open every day 
from 8 A. M. to 9 P. M. Telephone, Somerville 21-137. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Julius E. Richardson, 

Inspector of Milk and Vinegar. 



100 00 


10 00 


5 00 


5 00 


100 00 


10 00 


10 00 



SUPPORT OF POOR DEPARTMENT. 

I 



Board of Overseers of the Poor. 

Edward B. West, President. 

Albert W. Edmands, "Vice-president. 

Herbert E. Merrill. 

Committees. M 

On Finance, Investigation and Relief, and City Home. — Mr. "West 

Mr. Edmands, and Mr. Merrill. 

Secretary. 

Cora F. Lewis. 

General Agent. 

Charles C. Folsom. 

City Physician. 

Alvah B. Dearborn, M. D. 

Warden of **City Home." 

J. Foster Colquhoun. 

Matron of **City Home.** 

Mrs. Catherine Colquhoun. 

Office. 

City Hall Annex, Highland Avenue. 



I 



REPORT OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



Somerville, Mass., December 31, 1905. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor, and Board of Aldermen of the 
City of Somerville: — 

Gentlemen, — We beg leave to submit, for the year 1905, 
the report of our agent for miscellaneous account, and of the 
warden for the city home, with tables attached, showing re- 
ceipts and expenditures. 

The work in each department has been very satisfactory 
and the results we believe very creditable. 

Some slight alterations and much needed repairs at the city 
home, which we have every assurance will be done, will place 
the home in first-class condition for some time to come. 

To the agent and assistant and also to the warden and 
matron, we offer congratulations and thanks for the faithful and 
satisfactory work of the year. 

Edwaed B. West, ) Overseers 

Albert W. Edmands, >- of the 
Herbert E. Merrill, ) Poor 



REPORT OF GENERAL AGENT. 



Office of the Overseees of the Pook, ) 
Somerville, Mass., December 31, 1905. f 

To the Board of Overseers of the Poor, Somerville, Mass.: — 

Gentlemen, — I herewith submit my report for the year 
1905. As your agent, I have reported matters of interest to the 
board from month to month, and have conferred with the presi- 
dent whenever it seemed necessary, but in compliance with the 
vote of the board, I submit the following: — 

Where there is a man in the family aided, who is able to 
work, I have required him to go to the city farm and do what- 
ever the warden had for him to do. One hundred and forty-four 
days' work, such as they were, have been performed during the 
year, and have been paid for in fuel or groceries from the mis- 
cellaneous account. More persons have been committed to the 
state hospital at Tewksbury from Somerville than in any former 
year. There have been quite a number of perplexing questions 
in connection with some of the families and persons aided, but 
no serious friction has resulted, the persons interested having 
generally been satisfied. A dispute with Worcester in reference 
to the settlement of a pauper may lead to a friendly lawsuit 
with very little expense. The same is also true in relation to a 
family residing here, whose legal settlement is in dispute be- 
tween Newton and Boston. The town of Braintree contends 
that a family residing there, which has been aided to quite an 
extent, is settled in this city. We have denied it, however, and 
have informed that town that if they will furnish the proof, we 
will be as willing to pay the bill before a lawsuit as after. The 
above cases have been reported by me to the board, but I 
deemed it advisable to refer to them again in this report. The 
poor people of this city so far this fall and winter have been em- 
ployed to a greater extent than usual ; this fact and the very 
favorable weather have kept many from being obliged to apply 
for aid.' The work of the office has been carried on in a quiet, 
dignified way. No outside influences have given us any 
trouble, and we flatter ourselves that the department stands 
well with the tax-payers as well as with the poor people. We 
are not satisfied when we have aided a poor family, or a poor 
person, but it is our aim to help in any way we can so that they 
may become self-respecting and self-supporting if possible. I 
wish iu' connection with this report to express my appreciation 
of the work of the secretary in her correct book-keeping and 
substantial aid in the office. Thanking the board for courtesies 
extended, and for their general sympathy and help, I will re- 
fer you to the following tables, which will give a detailed ac- 
count of the work. 



SUPPOKT OF POOR DEPARTMENT. 



283 



Table No. 1. 

FULL SUPPORT (DURING THE YEAR). 

In our city home (men 20, women 9) . 

In our city home (men 15, women 7), December 31, 1905 

In private families 

In Somerville hospital 

In hospitals in other towns and cities for the sick 
In Massachusetts school for feeble-minded 
In hospital for dipsomaniacs .... 
In hospital for epileptics 



29 
22 

2 
187 
54 
6 
5 
4 



Table No. 2. 

PARTIAL SUPPORT (OUTDOOR RELIEF.*. 

Families 214 

Persons aided 1,205 

Burials 15 

Permits to Tewksbury almshouse 13 



Table No. 3. 

REIMBURSEMENTS. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
City of Boston . 
'' " Beverly 
" " Cambridge 
" " Chelsea 
" " Everett 
*' " Fall River 
" " Fitchburg 
" " Gloucester 
" " Haverhill 
" " Lowell 
" " Maiden 
" " New Bedford 
'[ " Newton 
'■ " Quincy 
" " Salem' . 
" " Springfield 
" " Waltham 
" " Woburn 
" " Worcester 
Town of Acton , 

Andover 

Arlington 

Belmont 

Canton 

Concord 

Framingham 

Gardner 

Leominster 

Wakefield 

West Boylston 

Winthop 
Guardians and relatives 



$1,358 72 


1,244 13 


49 00 


295 55 


44 64 


49 45 


200 05 


24 00 


52 17 


80 00 


9 00 


47 75 


25 00 


181 10 


21 00 


18 87 


38 00 


42 25 


35 00 


35 50 


11 75 


44 56 


33 00 


48 25 


7 75 


45 50 


29 30 


2 00 


36 59 


15 25 



21 95 

4 00 

196 84 



$4,347 92 



284 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



Table No. 4. 

SOMERVILLE HOSPITAL (PATIENTS ON CITY BEDS). 

Patients having settlement in Somerville .... 
Patients having settlement in other cities or towns 
Patients having no settlement (chargeable to state) . 
Total number of patients sent to hospital .... 
Money paid hospital by the city for patients settled in 

Somerville 

Amount reimbursed to the city and paid to the hospital 

for patients not settled in Somerville .... 

Total paid to the hospital . ' . 



74 

43. 

70 

187 


$5,000 oa 


1,538 55 



$6,538 55. 



Table No. 5. 

POPULATION AND GROSS EXPENDITURES, 1883 TO 1905, INCLUSIVE. 



Year. 

1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 

1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 

1905 

*Census. 



Population 
(Estimated). 

27,000 
28,000 

*29,992 
32,000 
34,000 
36,000 
39,000 

*40,117 
43,000 
46.000 
48,000 
50,000 

*52,200 
54,000 
56,000 
57,500 
60,000 

*61,643 
62,500 
63,500 
65,500 
69,500 

*69,272 



{ 



Miscellaneous, 
City home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City home. 
Miscellaneous, 
City home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City home, 
Miscellaneous, 
City home, 



$23,697.62 

5,528.83 
$29,171.15 

6,622.43 
$28,667.04 

7,396.64 
$30,470.20 

7,548.39 
$20,476.54 

6,563.11 
$17,527.88 

7,474.86 



Expenditures. 

$15,959 80. 

17,272 52^ 

16,430 3^ 

14,341 83 

13,430 8^ 

13,375 98 

14,610 92" 

15,261 14 

15,980 49 

17,015 30 

- 17,799 58 

19,733 13 

20,755 46 

21,999 79- 

25,681 47 

28,522 21 

28,924 39 

29,226 45 
35,793 58 
36,063 68 
38,018.5^ 
2r,039.65 
25,002.24 



Table No. 6. 

EXPENDITURES, IN DETAIL, FOR THE YEAR 1905. 



1905. 


Dry 

Goods. 


Board. 


Groceries. 


Somerville 

Poor in 

Other ■ Cities 

and Towns 


Boots 

and 

Shoes. 


Medicine. 


Burials. 


Salaries. 


Fuel. 


Sundries. 


Cash 
Paid 
Out. 


Tele- 
phone. 


Stationery 

and 
Printing. 


Somerville 
Hospital. 


State 
Hospital. 


Foxboxo 
Hospital. 


Feeble- 
minded 
School. 


Epileptic 
Hospital. 


Total. 


anuary . 
*ebruary . 
larch 
ipril . . 
lay . . 
une . 


|6 50 
'. 3* 00 


$29 15 

67 14 

32 15 
80 44 

33 58 
27 87 
59 86 
23 86 
27 87 
54 29 
32 16 
32 72 


$883 40 
308 43 
613 40 
549 44 
298 84 
394 62 
471 00 
386 29 
508 73 
425 01 
445 25 
355 09 


$718 81 

105 75 

8 00 

10 00 

66 00 


$10 00 

14 20 

2 00 

13 35 


$3 00 
"so 95 


$15 00 
30 00 
10 00 
34 00 


$341 66 
341 66 
341 66 
341 66 
341 6Q 
341 66 
341 66 
341 66 
341 66 
341 66 
341 66 
341 74 


$301 38 
178 43 

117 85 
10 48 

5 10 

1 00 

2 85 

1 00 

2 85 
1 90 

118 13 
75 30 


$1 50 

2 CO 

3 50 

* 15 00 

3 20 

9 00 
6 00 


$19 80 
19 50 
18 68 

11 39 
10 63 
15 52 

13 78 

12 73 

14 33 
12 28 
24 20 

8 35 


$26 02 

16*64 

16*22 
17 21 

16 84 


$29 75 

11 00 

1 60 

5 75 

* 33 30 
14 65 

5*00 


$133 33 
133 33 
133 33 
133 33 
133 33 
133 33 
133 33 
133 33 
133 33 
133 33 

205* 25 


$*114 00 
166* 29 
209* 20 


$166 67 

150* 68 
'51*08 


$170 84 

167 12 

298* 07 
256 26 


$152 75 
125 36 

126* 75 
128 14 


$2,983 54 
1,351 46 
1,655 60 
1,340 42 
1,072 07 








1,311 45 


uly . . 

LUgUSt . 

eptember 
)ctober . 


389 94 
86 27 
46 00 

156 29 
89 57 


. 8 50 
. 2 75 

* 15 00 


* 13 25 

29 85 
8 01 


35 CO 
40 00 
15 00 
15 00 


1,597 32 
1,269 56 
1,524 43 
1,184 61 


fovember 


140 57 


. . . 


• • • 


• • • 


1,200 54 


)ecember 


• • • 


12 43 


• • • 


1,036 88 


Totals . 


$9 50 


$501 09 


$5,639 50 


$1,676 68 


$65 80 


.^147 49 


$194 00 


$4,100 00 


$816 27 


$40 20 


$181 19 


$92 93 


$101 05 


$1,538 55 


630 06 


$368 33 


$892 29 


$533 00 


$17,627 88 



SUPPORT OF POOR DEPARTMENT. 285 

Overseers of the Poor of Somerville. 

SINCE THE REORGANIZATION IN 1885. 



Hon. Mark F. Burns, chairman ex-officio 



1885 1888 inclusive 



Colonel Herbert E. Hill 

Charles S. Lincoln, Esq., chairman . 

Hon. Edward Glines 

Charles G. Brett, president 
Edward B. West, president 

Daniel C. Stillson 

Hon. Charles G. Pope, chairman ex-officio 

Nathan H. Reed, president ... 

Hon. Wm. H. Hodgkins, chairman ex-officio, 1892 1895 

James G. Hinckley May 1892 1894 

Albert W. Edmands May 1893 to date* 

Herbert E. Merrill May 1894 to date* 

Ezra D. Souther 1895 Feb. 1898 (Died) 

Hon. Albion A. Perry, chairman ex-officio . 1896 1898 inclusive 

James H. Butler March 1898 1899 

Hon. George O. Proctor, chairman ex-officio, 1899 



1885 1889 

1885 1887 

1885 1887 

1885 April 1893 
1888 to date* 

1888 April 1892 

1889 1891 

1890 April 1894 



*Present member. 



Table No. 7. 

RECAPITULATION (MISCELLANEOUS). 

Appropriation $14,000 00 

Reimbursements 4,347 92 

Total receipts $18,347 92 

Total expenditures 17,527 88 

Balance "... . $820 04 

Net expenditures 13,179 9Q 

Very respectfully, 

Charles C. Folsom, 

General Agent. 



286 



ANNUAL EEPOETS. 



REPORT OF WARDEN OF CITY HOME. 



Living expenses 
Total expense 



Table No. 1. 

PERMANENT REPAIRS AND FIXTURES. 

New curtains, dormitory 

New beds and bedding, dormitory 

New bed linen, dormitory 

New furniture, dormitory 

New rubber matting, dormitory 

New, window screens, dormitory 

New concrete walks . 

Glass, putty, hardware, and labor, hothouse 

Pipe, valves, and piping, hothouse 

Pipe cement and labor (drain and stone 

wall) . , . . 

Pipe fence on stone wall . 
Storm porch .... 

Lawn seed 

2,L56 lights glass for new sash 



245 75 

79 00 
2ia 90 
34 48 
72 40 
91 65 
286 67 
75 63 

83 24 
34 59 
60 00 
3 30 
21 56 



$1,329 03 
6,145 33 

$7,474 36. 



Table No. 2. 

REIMBURSEMENTS. 



Board of sundry persons 
Produce and pork sold 



$100 50 
3,811 74 



$3,912 24- 



Table No. 3. 

REIMBURSEMENTS. 



Produce and pork sold . 
Produce used at city home 



$3,811 74 
313 00 



$4,124 74 



EXTRA EXPENSE ON FARM. 



Wages for extra help 

Feed for one horse . 

Shoeing for one horse 

Repairs on wagons and harnesses 

Repairs on sash 

Swill and bedding . 

Farm sundries .... 

Seed and fertilizer . 







$1,096 


70 






117 


14 






16 


12 






86 


10 






9 


15 






308 67 






151 


35 






116 


17 



$1,901 40 



Balance 



$2,223 34 



SUPPORT OF POOR DEPARTMENT. 



287 



Table No. 4. 

Number weeks' board .... 
Average weekly cost of inmates . 
Number of males admitted during 1905 
Number of females admitted during 1905 
Number of males discharged during 1905 
Number of females discharged during 1905 
Number of males supported during 1905 
Number of females supported during 1905 
Number of males died during 1905 
Number of females died during 1905 
Number of inmates in home January 1, 1906, 



1,075 4-7 
$2 08 
13 

2 

8 

1 
24 

9 

1 

1 







Table No. 5. 








LIVING EXPENSES. 




Groceries and provisions 


• • • 


$1,754 37 




Salaries and wages . 


. 


2,442 18 




Dry goods 






179 00 




Boots and shoes 






42 55 




Hay and grain . 




• • • 


535 59 




Seeds and fertilizer 




• » 


116 17 




House furnishings 




J • 


12 90 




Kitchen furnishings 




. 


76 02 




Sundries . ' . 




• • • • 


147 96 




Farm sundries . 






123 07 




Cash paid by warden (ca 


r fares for warden 






inmates, and laborc 


^rs) . . . 


37 75 




Medicine . 




45 77 




Horseshoeing . 






48 35 




Repairs on wagons 






86 10 




Repairs on sash 




. 


9 15 




Telephone 






47 92 




Ice 






20 85 




General repairs 






41 76 




Swill and bedding 




. 


353 80 




New tools . 






22 07 




Live stock . 




• . . 


2 00 










$6,145 33 






Credits: — 








Produce and pork sold . 


. 


$3,811 74 




Board for sundry persons 


> . . . 


100 50 


3,912 24 







Net living expenses 



$2,233 09 



Very respectfully, 

J. Foster Colquhoun, 

Warden. 



REPORT OF THE CITY PHYSICIAN. 



Office of City Physician, ) 
Somerville, February 1, 1906. j 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen: — 

Gentlemen, — The following is a summary of the work done 
by me during the year ending December 31, 1905: — 

One thousand two hundred fifty-one house visits have been 
made. Eight hundred sixty-five persons were treated at my 
office. Twenty-six women were attended in child-birth. One 
hundred twenty persons were vaccinated. One hundred thirty- 
five persons have had teeth extracted. Thirty-five visits have 
been made at the police station. 

Under the rules of the board of health, ninety-five cultures 
for release have been taken in cases of diphtheria. 

Seventeen men were examined for the police force. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Alvah B. Dearbokn", 

City Physician. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



Office of the City Engineer, ^ 

City Hall, Somerville, January 15, 1906. J 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen : — 

Gentlemen, — In accordance with the provisions of the city 
charter, the following report of the work done and expense in- 
curred for the year ending- December 31, 1905, by the depart- 
ments and appropriations under my charge and supervision, in- 
cluding Engineering, Grade Crossings, Sewers Construction, 
Sewers Maintenance, Public Grounds, and other public works, 
is herewith presented. 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 
Statement of Expenses, 1905. 

Salary City Engineer (including maintenance 

of team) $2,800 00 

Salaries of assistants 7,885 39 

Stakes, tools, and general supplies (outside 

work) . 94 83 

Draughting materials and office supplies (in- 
side work) . . . . . . . 100 32 

Setting stone bounds for defining street lines 

(materials) 23 50 

Car fares . . . 192 75 

Telephone, postage, and incidentals . . 177 68 

Total debit $11,274 47 

CREDIT. 

Appropriation . $11,250 00 

Amount received for making acceptance plans, 36 00 
Amount received from School Contingent 

fund for maps 2 00 

Total $11,288 00 

Balance unexpended $13 53 



$2,695 00' 



249 30 


69 48 


256 00 


283 38 


463 10 



^^^ ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Classification of Expenses, Assistants' Salaries. 

Sewers,— comprising surveys, estimates, profiles, lines, 
grades, titles, plans, assessments, and all engineering 
work relating to sewers 

Highways,— comprising plans, estimates, titles', profiles*, 
Imes and grades, and all other engineering relating 
to the department 57q 35. 

Sidewalks,— comprising profiles, lines, grades, measure- 
ments, titles, costs, and assessments .... 1,064 20 

Water Works,— comprising lines, grades, locations of 
mains, gates, hydrants and services, and other mat- 
_ ter relating to water department 255 82' 

Public Grounds,— comprising surveys, plans, estimates, 
profiles and grades, including laying out of parks 
and grounds and boulevards 

Public Buildings, — comprising surveys, estimates, lines 
and grades, and other work relating to construction, 

Street Numbering, — comprising locations of buildings, 
plans, and affixing street numbers on houses . 

Street Lines and Grades, — comprising establishing of 
lines, grades, and miscellaneous data given parties 
for building and grading 

City Survey, — comprising establishing of street lines, ac- 
ceptance plans, and miscellaneous survey work for 
bridges, etc 

Middlesex Registry, — comprising copying of plans and 
abstracts from deeds and examination of titles filed 
at East Cambridge, also tracings of street accept- 
ance and sewer taking plans filed for record . . 185 92" 

Railway, Telephone, Electric Light, and Gas Light Com- 
panies, — comprising grades, plans, profiles and office 
notes, locations of poles and conduits ... 47 54 

Stone Bounds, — locating and setting 108 29' 

Office Work, — comprising records of all locations, index- 
ing, tvpewriting, calculations, and general draught- 
ing .* 1,100 97 

Miscellaneous Work, — comprising preliminary surveys, 
designs, sketches, etc., relating to various schemes 
for different committees 186 04 

Vacations and Sickness 350 00 

Total $7,885 39" 

Special work on grade crossings (charged to Grade 

Crossings account) $266 22 



Office Records and Value of Instruments. 

Number of survey note-books, sewer permit books, and deed books, twO' 
hundred and fifty. 

Number of plans, including sewers, highways, parks, house lots, etc., six 

thousand. 
Value of field instruments, tools, and office instruments, $1,600. 

The total cost of maintaining the city engineer's department 
since it was established (1872-1905, both years inclusive) has 
amounted to $225,696.15. 



CITY ENGINEER. 29T 

General Work. The number of assistants employed during 
the year on engineering work varied from eight to fourteen. 

The department has made designs, plans, estimates of cost 
of contemplated and completed public works, etc., as required by 
various orders of the board of aldermen and committees. All 
survey notes, records, and plans made of sewers, drains, highway 
work, water works, etc., have been filed for future reference. 

All plans of estates in Somerville recorded at the Registry 
of Deeds, East Cambridge, have been copied, titles examined, 
and abstracts from deeds made for the purpose of assessments,, 
and the proportional part of the cost of new work computed, and. 
schedules of assessments made out showing the property owners.. 

Plans have been made and photographs taken where acci- 
dents have occurred on the city's work or where boundaries were 
in dispute, for the use of the city solicitor in court cases and^ 
hearings. 

A number of street names have been changed and plans 
made showing a re-numbering of the buildings, and all old num- 
bering plans revised, new houses plotted, and numbers assigned ; 
some of the old main thoroughfares should be re-numbered 
throughout their entire length, so as to eliminate half numbers 
and letters now being used, as many of these old streets have out- 
grown their original numbering. 

There are many streets, avenues, courts, and places in the 
city of the same or very similar name, which should be changed, 
to prevent the confusion and inconvenience now existing. 

Stone monuments have been set at a number of street inter- 
sections and angles to define and preserve the true lines of public- 
streets, and this work should be continued as much as possible 
each year. By setting these stone bounds, or monuments, in 
Portland cement concrete at the level of the surface of the 
ground, or flush with the surface of the sidewalk, they can also 
be used as permanent "Bench Marks" throughout the city by 
establishing their exact elevations, and thereby being a great con- 
venience and saving of time in giving grades, not only for the 
city engineering department, but also for all other surveyors. 

Lines and grades have been given for the erection of new 
city buildings, and plans and sketches made for the laying out of 
the surrounding grounds. 

About one hundred and fifteen street lines and grades have 
been given by the department during the year for builders and 
private parties applying for established grades and lines in con- 
nection with the erection of buildings and fences and grading of. 
property. 



292 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Accurate plans have been made by the Edison Electric 
Illuminating Company, of Boston, the New England Telephone 
and Telegraph Company, West End Street Railway Company, 
Charlestown Gas and Electric Company, and Cambridge Gas 
Light Company, and filed in this office, showing the various loca- 
tions of poles, tracks, and conduits in this city which have been 
granted by the board of aldermen during the year. A special act 
of the legislature with reference to the city of Somerville was 
passed in April, 1905, whereby the city has authority tO' cause the 
electric light and telephone companies to place all their overhead 
wires in conduits underground in certain specified streets, and 
remove all poles from these streets to the extent of not more 
than two miles in length for the telephone and telegraph com- 
pany and for the electric light company, involving an expendi- 
ture of not more than $20,000 in any one year. 

There were laid, previous to 1905, 52,900 linear feet of under- 
ground conduits by the New England Telephone and Telegraph 
Company, and during 1905 this company constructed 9,960 linear 
feet of underground conduits, and the Edison Electric Illumina- 
ting Company, 3,240 linear feet of conduits extending in Broad- 
way from the Charlestown line northwesterly. 

Lines and grade have been given for laying 4,050 linear 
feet of new water mains varying in size from six inches to twelve 
inches in diameter, and 1,624 feet of old pipe were relaid. Two 
hundred seventy-two house services, twenty-one gates, twenty- 
three hydrants, and one water post have been located and re- 
corded, sketches and plans made showing the same, and the large 
water works map corrected to date. 

During the year the department has made plans and estab- 
lished grades for the acceptance, under the betterment act, of 
nine new pubHc streets, a total length of 0.92 mile ; copies of 
these plans have been made and filed at the Middlesex Registry, 
as required by law. Six plans have been made for acceptance of 
private streets, but not as yet made public. 

Eleven streets have been constructed during the year where 
betterment assessments have been levied. 

The total length of public streets in the city amounts to 70.22 
miles, and private streets 23.5 miles. 

Lines and grades have been given for setting l^.^^^ ^inear 
feet (3"37 miles) of new edgestone, and the re-setting of 4,206.8 
feet (2*.25 miles) of old edgestone and measurements taken for 
computing assessments. 

5 148 7 square yards of new brick sidewalks and 5,226 square 
yards 'of granolithic and tar concrete sidewalks have been laid 



CITY ENGINEER. 



293 



(about 1.9 miles in length), and 1,453.8 square yards of old brick 
sidewalks re-laid. 

The average cost for the year of setting- edgestone with 
gravel sidewalk has been eighty-nine cents per linear foot, and 
laying brick sidewalks, $1.03 per square yard; one sidewalk of 
granolithic was laid by the city, day labor, at a cost of $1.36 per 
square yard. 

5,994.9 square yards of new paved gutters have been laid, 
and 350.4 square yards of new vitrified brick and granite cross- 
ings and driveways constructed ; 1,681.2 square yards of old 
gutters, driveways, and crossings have been re-laid, all requiring 
lines, grades, and measurements. 

(See tables in this report for cost of new work, 1905, and 
total lengths of sidewalks constructed in the city to date.) 



Streets Accepted as Public Highways in 1905 under the 

Betterment Act, 



Name of Street. 


Ward. 


From 


To 


Width 
in Feet. 


Length 
inFeet. 


Date of 
Acceptance. 


Hamlet st. . . . 
Hanson st. . . . 
Hanson st. . . . 
Lexington ave. 

Nashua st. . . . 
Skehan st. . . . 
Thorpe pi. . . . 
Vernon st. . . . 
Vernon st. . . . 
Warren st. . . . 
Wheatland st. . . 


3 

2 
2 
6 

5 

2 
3 
5 
5 
1 
4 


Highland ave. . 
Washington st. . 
Skehan st. • . 
Willow ave. . . 

Richardson st. . 

Dane st. . . . 
Highland ave. . 
Lowell St. . . . 
Partridge ave. . 
Medford st. . . 
Jaques st. , . 


Southerly . . . 
Skehan st. . . 
Vine St. ... 
Hancock st. . . 
B. & M. R. R. 

(So. div.) 
Hanson st. . . 
Southerly . . . 
Partridge ave- . 
Glenwood rd. 
Cambridge line . 
Mystic ave. . . 


30 
30 
35 
50 

35 

30 
30 
30 
30 to 40 
30 to 40 
40 


451 
469 
347 
624 

637 

306 
468 
434 
190 
109 
828 


Dec. 30 
June 26 
June 26 
Sept. 15 

July 21 

Sept. 15 
Dec. 30 
July 21 
July 21 
Sept. 15 
Nov. 20 


Total .... 






(0.92 miles) 




4,863 













Length of Public Streets in Each Ward. 

Miles. 

Ward one 9.182 

Ward two 7.828 

Ward three 7.260 

Ward four 9.109 

Ward five 10.265 

Ward six 11.504 

Ward seven 14.715 

Total length of public streets in the city . 70.223 



^94 ANKUAL REPORTS. 

Miles of Edgestone, Brick Sidewalk and Gravel Sidewalk, in 

Each Ward. 

Kdge- Brick Gravel 

stone. Sidewalk. Sidewalk. 

Ward one 16.728 11.785 4.943 

Ward two 12.400 4.249 8.151 

Ward three 12.784 11.612 1.172 

Ward four 12.632 8.725 3.907 

ward five . 16.748 10.180 6.568 

Ward SIX 19.761 12.058 7.703 

Ward seven 17.459 8.558 8.901 

Total miles in the city .... 108.512 *67.167 41.345 



^Includes 3.97 miles granolithic and tar concrete walk. 

Table of Street Construction. 

Miles. 

♦Streets paved with granite blocks . . . " . . . . 2.85 

Streets paved with asphalt 0.73 

Streets paved with vitrified brick (Davis square) .... 0.16 

Streets paved with "bitulithic" 0.88 

**Streets macadamized 65.45 

Streets graveled or unimproved 23.65 

« 

Total 93.72 

*Also 29.6 miles (single track) electric railway, paved with granite, 
asphalt, "bitulithic." 

**Includes 2.84 miles boulevard. 

Lines, grades, and measurements have been given and mis- 
cellaneous work done for paving with ''Warren's Bitulithic Pave- 
ment" a portion of Pearl street, Gilman square, and Medford 
street, extending from Cross street to the westerly line of School 
street, a length of 2,845 linear feet, amounting to 7,603.8 square 
yards. The space occupied by the street railway tracks was not 
paved with the new pavement, but left with the old granite block 
pavement. The contract price for laying this new pavement 
complete, including a five-years' guarantee, was $2.25 per square 
yard, and the entire cost to the city of the new work was 
$18,558.54, deducting the amount allowed" for old materials re- 
mioved on the line of work as a credit to the account, shows the 
net cost to the city, $18,298.27. 

The vitrified brick pavement has been extended in Davis 
square. West Somerville, easterly on Highland avenue a length 
of 100 feet, amounting to 433 yards, at a total cost of $1,261.52; 
the street railway company paving the space occupied by their 
track location with the same material. 

This pavement was laid on a Portland cement concrete base, 
and the brick joints grouted with Portland cement. 



Table Showing Sidewalks Constructed (not exceeding one-half cost assessed on abutters) and Paved Gutters Laid in Connection Therewith in 1905. 











Ward. 










From 


To 


Width of 
Sidewalk 
IN Feet. 


Materials. 




TOTA L 

Cost. 


Pavhd Gutters. 


Street. 


Side. 


Gravel and | 
Edgestone. 1 
Lineal Feet. 


Bricks. 
Sq. Yards. 


Sq. Yards. 

288.2 


Cost. 


Alston . 








1 


( Southerly . 
/ Northerly . 






\ 


Cross st 


/ Shawmut pi. . . . ) 
t E'lyline B.& M.R.R.sta.lot { 


6.67 


864.5 




$754 35 


$550 14 


Bartlett 








5 


Southeasterly 








Ames st 


Robinson st. . 


6.67 




128.0 


118 23 






''Broadway . 






> 


5 


Northerly . 








Main st. .... 


Opposite Norwood ave. . 




1,328.7 




1,363 09 


442.9 


776 89 


Chandler 










( Southeasterly 
( Northwesterly 








William st. . . .) 
Estate No. 64 . . . ( 


Broadway .... 


6.67 




605.0 


638 80 






Charnwood road 








6 


Both . 








Willow ave. 


Hancock st. . . . 


6.67 




804.7 


840 76 






Durham 








2 


Both . 








Beacon st. ... 


Hanson st. ... 


6.67 
( 10.50 1 
1 10.5 to 10 J 


882.9 




788 97 


294.3 


523 72 


Elm 








6 


Southwesterly 








Mossland st. . 


Whitest 


564.4 




545 86 


188.1 


367 91 


Evergreen avenue 








5 


Northerly . 








Thurston st. . . 


Sycamore st. . 


6.67 


308.6 




256 57 


120.0 


189 10 


Farragut avenue 








7 


Both . 








Broadway 


Southerly about 600 ft. . 


6.67 


1,184.0 




1,000 21 


394.7 


556 93 


Glen wood road 








5 


Westerly . 








Medford st. . . . 


Southerly line No, 56 


9.00 


j 6.00 brick ( 
1 3.00 sod. ( 


201.6 


243 34 






Hanson 








2 


Both . 








Washington st. 


Vine st 


5.00 and 6.00 


1,580.1 




1,302 97 


526.7 


764 15 


Hawthorne . 








7 


Both . 








Willow ave. 


Cutter ave. 


5.00 


1,599.3 




1,412 14 


533.1 


856 35 


Holland 








7 


( Northeasterly 
I Where not laid 






\ 


Irving st 


Broadway .... 


10.00 


1,155.5 




1,223 65 


439.0 


736 22 


Hudson 








5 


Northerly . 
( Southwesterly 
1 Where not laid 






\ 


Lowell st 


Cedar st 


6.67 




964.3 


969 92 






Main 








5 






Broadway .... 


Medford city line . . 


8.S3 to 9.00 


705.9 




703 42 


241.0 


453 30 


Medford 








1 


Easterly 








Boston & Albany R. R. . 


Cambridge line 


8.33 


22.4 


137.9 


211 11 






Medford 








5 


Southwesterly 








Glenwood rd. . 


( Westerly, Ann E. . .) 
j McLaughlin estate . . ) 


9.17 




85.4 


98 72 


...*.. 




Moreland 








6 


Both . 








Main st 


Meacham st. . 


6.67 


1,419.6 




1,440 04 


552.1 


878 77 


Morrison 








7 


( Northeasterly 
1 Where not laid . 






\ 


College ave. 


Willow ave. 


6.67 





722.2 


769 83 






Mt. Vernon . 








1 


Easterly 








Pearl st 


Southerly to old stone 


8.33 to 6.67 


49.7 


54.5 


88 50 


10.6 


62 20 


Ossipee road 








7 


Both . 








Packard ave. 


Curtis st 


6.67 


1,443.5 





1,218 11 


481.2 


701 30 


Pearl . 








1 


Southwesterly 








Mt. Vernon st. . 


Crescent st. . . . 


6.00 


333.8 


189.5 


572 60 


111.3 


226 05 


Pritchard avenue 








6 


Both . 








Morrison ave. . 


Frederick ave. 


6.67 


1,299.2 




1,141 41 


433.1 


724 40 


Richardson . 








5 


Both . 








Lowell st 


Lawrence st. . 


5.83 


940.6 




850 56 


313.5 


461 73 


Spencer avenue 








6 


Both . 








Cedar st 


Hancock st. . . . 


6.67 




992.8 


996 87 






Sydney . 








4 


Northeasterly 








Grant st 


Temple st. ... 


6.67 


702.7 




632 63 


234.2 


303 60 


AV arren 








2 


Both . 








Medford st. . . . 


Cambridge city line . 


5.00 to 6.67 


196.3 




206 90 






* Willow avenue 








6 


Easterly . 








Frederick ave. . 


Broadway .... 


8.33 


f 5.00 walk ( 
\ 3.33 sod. J 
942.7 


559.4 


783 65 






Wilton 








5 


Both . 








Lowell st 


Lawrence st. . 


5.83 




842 19 


314.2 


437 43 


Wyatt . 








2 
4.70 


Westerly . 








No. 14, 16, 18, 20. . 
.71 




6.67 




63.5 


57 20 






Total assessment, ^10,3^ 


Net cost to city, $10,35^ 


17,524.4 


5,508.8 


$22,072 50 


5,924.2 


#9,570 19 


Amount of edgestone and brick si( 


iewalk, including granolithic, ir 


1 front of private estates 




. 


264.2 


4,866.0 




70.7 


$92 62 


Totals. (Gravel sidewalks, 3. 


036 miles. Brick, granolithic, 


and tar sidewalks, 3.301 miles.) 
















^Assessmen 


t aba 


ted a 


md 


charffec 


i to Hiehwav Mair 


itena 


nee. 




♦Granolithic. 

















CITY ENGINEEK. 395 

A small amount of granite block paving was laid in Warren 
street, 267.5 square yards, and on the southerly side of Somer- 
ville avenue, near the Cambridge line, 374.5 square yards were 
laid. 

Many of the city's streets are constructed and repaired in a 
haphazard fashion rather than by adhering to a scientific scheme 
of laying a suitable permanent pavement of granite blocks, bitu- 
lithic, vitrified brick or asphalt, adapted to the character of the 
surroundings and amount of traffic and conditions encountered. 

Where double car tracks have been laid in streets, leaving 
narrow roadways on either side, with flat grades, and streets that 
are continually torn up and openings made for underground 
work, it is impossible to maintain their surfaces in a proper con- 
dition, even at a heavy expense yearly. 

On some of the principal streets the edgestones should be 
<:ompleted and gutters paved, so that the street can be properly 
drained in times of heavy storms. 

All new construction work on highways, water works exten- 
sion, etc., should be done by contract with the lowest bidder, 
under specifications and plans drawn by the city engineer, and 
thereby saving a considerable percentage of cost. 

A petition is pending before the board of aldermen from the 
Boston-Lowell Interurban Street Railway for an elevated track 
location the entire length of Mystic avenue, extending from the 
Charlestown line to the Medford line, and a section in the north- 
westerly part of the city crossing over the Powder-house boule- 
vard and extending into Arlington. 

A public hearing has been held on this matter, and if this 
structure is built it will necessitate the widening and filling to 
grade of this avenue and macadamizing the roadway. 

There are at present laid in Somerville streets twenty-nine 
and six-tenths miles of electric car track (single track location). 

Plans and estimates of cost of constructing bridges and 
changing grades of Lowell street over the Southern division of 
the Boston & Maine railroad and Lexington and Arlington 
Ijranch of this railroad have been made and submitted to the 
county commissioners and railroad commissioners; and after 
many hearings held before the commissioners on the matter dur- 
ing the year, and the presentation of much data on the subject, 
a favorable report has been made for constructing bridges in 
accordance with the plans presented. 

The abolition of steam railroad grade crossings in this city 
has been a matter of discussion and consideration by various city 
governments for a number of years past, and while the expense 
to the city for changing these crossings would be large the 
amount would be quite small when compared with the total cost 
and amount of work involved by the railroad companies. 

In June of the past year a special commission, consisting of 
three members, was appointed by the court to consider the mat- 



296 ANNUAL KEPOETS. 

ter of abolition of crossing- at grade on the line of the Fitchburg' 
division of the Boston & Maine railroad through the city. Con- 
siderable work has been accomplished during the latter part of 
the year in making plans, profiles, and studies as to the most 
feasible and best design for the city tO' prepare and present to 
this commission for their consideration of the changes to be 
made, and probably in the early part of 1906 a plan will be pre- 
sented. 

Plfteen hundred dollars was appropriated for preparing plans 
and data on this grade crossing work, and $522.70 has been ex- 
pended. 

Perambulation of City Boundary Lines. In December, 1905, 
representatives from the city of Somerville and city of Cambridge 
examined the bounds defining the division line between the two 
cities ; and also met representatives from the town of Arlington 
and performed a like duty on the boundary line between Somer- 
ville and Arlington, reporting in due form to the board of alder- 
men. These boundary lines are perambulated every five years. 

Considerable work has been done by the engineering depart- 
ment at various times by the collection of data and estimates in 
reference to the newly-constructed bridge across Mystic river, 
between Somerville and Wellington, on the line of the Metro- 
politan parkway, and used at hearings held before the commis- 
sion for apportionment, and their decision was rendered in Sep- 
tember, 1905, on the percentage of cost of construction and main- 
tenance, to be paid as follows : — 

Metropolitan Park district 

Medford 

Maiden 

Somerville 

Stoneham 

Reading 



50 


per 


cent. 


19 






14 






.121/2 






31/2 






1 







Total 100 per cent. 



CITY ENGINEER. 



297 



SEWER DEPARXnENT. 

Sewers Construction Account. 



STATEHENT OF EXPENSES, 1905. 



Constructing "separate system" sewers (as 
sessments levied) petitioned for . 

Constructing "separate system" sewers (no 
assessments) .... 

Constructing "combined system" sewers (as 
sessments levied) petitioned for . 

Constructing storm drains and overflows 

Constructing fifty catch basins, street 
drainage 

Final payments on sewers constructed 1904 

Work and materials furnished other depart- 
ments (unpaid $473.86) . . 

Sundry expenses, books and printing . 

Materials on hand December 31, 1905 . 

Total expenditure . . . . ^ 
Transferred to Highway Construction 

paving 

Transferred to Sidewalks Construction 
Transferred to Electrical Department . 
Transferred to Grade Crossings account 



Total 



CREDIT. 

Appropriation 

Balance unexpended December 31, 1904 
Assessments levied, sewers constructed 1905 
Amounts received from other departments 
Reserves on contracts, due 1906 . 
Materials on hand December 31, 1904 . 



Total 



Balance unexpended 



$1,798 51 

9,553 58 

1,322 30 
6,630 35 

2,532 86 
499 34 

723 46 

15 75 
815 03 



$23,891 18 


8,000 00 


2,000 00 


700 00 


1,500 00 


$30,000 00 


6,747 08 


2,686 94 


270 37 


740 30 


358 01 



,091 18 



$40,802 70 
$4,711 52 

The greater part of the new construction work has been 
done by contract, and the remainder by the city employing day 
labor, where old structures were to be remodeled or replaced by 
some difficult construction work. 

All materials have been furnished by the city, and the prices 
paid for drain pipe, cement, etc., for the season have been at an 
unusually low rate. 

A number of sewers have been constructed as petitioned for 
in different sections of the city, and portions of the cost of con- 
struction assessed on the abutting estates under orders adopted 
by the board of aldermen. 

Short lines of storm drains and overflows from congested 
sewers have been constructed during the year in the most needed 
districts. 



•298 ANNUAL EEPORTS. 

In the North Somerville district, construction on a perma- 
nent storm drainage system has been commenced (the outlet 
being through the city of Medford into Mystic river), and nego- 
tiations are still pending with private land owners for rights of 
drainage on this line of work for a further improvement of a 
large area. 

The ''separate system" sewers (those built for house drainage 
only) have been extended in a number of streets, and this system 
should be extended yearly until all the flooded districts in the 
city have two complete systems of drainage, the new sewer to 
be used for storm and surface water. The city pays the entire 
cost of these new extensions. 

Wherever these new sewers are constructed^ the house 
plumbing should be changed where necessary, and the house 
drains re-connected with both systems as soon as possible. 

New sewers and drains were constructed during the year, 
varying in size from eight-inch pipe to twenty-four-inch pipe, in 
'the following localities : — 

''Separate system" sewers in : — 

Boston avenue, — Pearson avenue to Prichard avenue. 
Bromfield road, — Two Penny brook to near Warner 

street. 
Dell street, — (northerly side) Glen street, westerly. 
Dickson street, — Broadway, northeasterly. 
Fountain avenue, — (both sides) Glen street, westerly. 
Franklin street, — (westerly side) Palmer avenue to 

Oliver street. 
Glen street, — (easterly side) Fountain avenue to Dell 

street. 
Harris street, — Beacon street to near the Cambridge 

line. 
Joseph street, — (southerly side) near Adrian street to 

Lincoln parkway. 
Lincoln parkway, — (southerly side) Joseph street, west- 
erly. 
North street, — Powder-house boulevard to Russell road. 
Oliver street, — (southerly side) Franklin street to west 

of Glen street. 
Palmer avenue, — (southerly side) Franklin street to 

private lands. 
Private lands, — Palmer avenue to Glen street. 
Russell road,— North street, easterly and southerly. 
Somerville avenue,— No. 46 to near the East- Cambridge 

line. 
Washington street,— (southerly side) Perry street to 

Beacon street. 



CITY ENGINEEK. 399 

'^Combined system" sewers in: — 

City Farm lands, — Berwick street, northwesterly to gar- 
bage plant. 

Highland avenue, — (northerly side) Cedar street to near 
Lowell street. 

Packard avenue, — Teele avenue to near Talbot avenue. 

Prichard avenue, — Frederick avenue to near Boston 
avenue. 

Skilton avenue, — Pearl street, southerly and westerly. 

Storm drains in: — 

Broadway, — (northerly side) Pearson road to Boston 

avenue. 
Pearson road, — Two Penny brook to Broadway. 

Summary of Work. Twenty-four new sewers and drains 
"have been constructed during the year, a total length of 11,511.7 
linear feet (2.18 miles) at a cost of $19,608 ; plans have been made 
showing these sewers in detail and assessments levied on a 
portion of them, amounting to $2,687. (See tabular statement 
of sewers and drains for 1905, showing itemized statement of 
work and cost.) 

The total length of the city's drainage system is 92.96 miles, 
20.115 miles being on the "separate system," and 5.606 miles of 
storm drains, and the entire cost of construction has amounted to 
about $1,163,936, exclusive of the amount paid the state for the 
construction of the North Metropolitan sewerage system. 

Fifty new catch basins have been constructed in the high- 
ways during the year, at an average cost of $50.66 per basin, 
making a total of 1,364 catch basins in the city for street drainage 
purposes. 

Metropolitan Sewer Connections. All of the city's ten con- 
nections with the North Metropolitan sewerage system are in 
good condition. No new main connections have been required. 

A plan and profile has been made showing a proposed sewer 
for the purpose of drainage from the Hinckley rendering works, 
located on the marsh lands and connecting with the Metropolitan 
main on Mystic avenue at Melrose street. 

At the Somerville-avenue-Poplar-street connection with the 
Metropolitan sewer, records compiled from an automatic record- 
ing clock placed in the ''regulator chamber" on the combined 
rsystem show this outlet to have been cut of¥ as follows : — 

Year 1905, completely closed 297 hours, partly closed 548 hours. 

In previous years the following : — 

Year 1904, completely closed 279 hours, partly closed 922 hours. 

" 1903, " " 180 " " " 167 " 

" 1902, " " 376 '' " " 877 " 

" 1901, " " 886 " " " 225 " 

" 1900, '' " 353 " " " 114 " 



300 ANNUAL EEPOETS. 

The city's assessment for the Metropolitan system for the 
past year was $32,966.96 on construction account and $18,886.84 
for maintenance, and the total amount paid the commonwealth 
of Massachusetts for this state sewer has been $522,489.81 
(1894-1905, both years inclusive). The total length of the Met- 
ropolitan sewerage system mains running through the city 
amounts to 3.368 miles. 

New Work. The construction of the storm drainage system 
commenced the past year should be continued in the vicinity of 
North Somerville, where buildings and new streets are being 
rapidly constructed, with no good and permanent means yet pro- 
vided for taking care of the storm water. 

Storm drainage should be provided on sections of Mystic 
avenue. 

In the vicinity of Lowell and Vernon streets, some arrange- 
ment should be made with the railroad company, whenever the 
highway bridge is constructed at Lowell street, for providing an 
outlet for storm water in this locality through the railroad valley, 
which would be beneficial to both city and railroad. 

A large storm overflow drain has been contemplated for 
some time at the East Cambridge line, across private lands from 
Somerville avenue, discharging into the head of Miller's river. 
In conjunction with this last Iproposed work, a readjustment of 
the present legislative act should be made on a more equitable 
basis, whereby the amount paid by this city to Cambridge for the 
maintenance of the Somerville-avenue-Bridge-street sewer would 
be less and in proportion to- the use of the same at the present 
time, the prevailing conditions being far different from what 
existed some thirty years ago, when the division of the cost was 
established. 

A special act of the legislature in 1903 authorized the cities 
of Somerville and Cambridge and the towns of Arlington and 
Belmont to unite in improving the sanitary condition of Alewife 
brook within the limits of the referred-to cities and towns, and 
after considerable preliminary work had been done it was deemed 
advisable to suspend operations, as another act was passed by 
the legislature in 1904 whereby, in conjunction with the Metro- 
politan Park Commission, the entire length of Alewife brook, to- 
gether with upper Mystic river in Medford, might be improved 
far more extensively than at first proposed by the cities and towns 
originally interested in the matter. No construction work has 
been done, and the brook remains in the same unimproved con- 
dition. 

Following tables show itemized cost of sewers constructed 
in 1905 ; sewers constructed on the "separate system" ; storm 



TABULAR STATEMENT OF SEWERS BUILT IN 1905. 



LOCATION. 



Name of Street. 



♦Boston ave 

•Bromfield road 

City Farm (garbage drainage) 
•Dickson st. . . . 
•Franklin st. (west side) and 

Oliver st. (south side) 
•Glen St. (southeast side) and 

•Dell St. (northeast side) 
•Harris St. ... 

Highland ave. (north side) 
*Joseph St. (west side) and 

•Lincoln parkway (south side) 
•North St. and . 
•Russell road 
Packard ave. . 
'Palmer ave. (south side) 
•Private lands and 
•Fountain ave. (both sides) 
Pearson road (storm drain) and 
Broadway (stirm drain, north 
side) .... 
Pritchard ave. 
Skilton ave. 
•Somerville ave. (south side) 
•Washington st. (south side) 



Pearson ave. . 
Two Penny brook 

Berwick st. 

Broadway 

Palmer ave. . 

Franklin st. . 

Fountain ave. 

Glen St. . 

Beacon st. 

Cedar st. 

End of old sewer . 

Joseph St. 

Powder House boulevard 

North St. 

Teele ave. 

Franklin st. . 

Palmer ave. . 

Glen St. 

Two Penny brook 

Pearson road . 

S. of Frederick ave. 

Pearl st. 

No. 50 Somerville ave. 

Perry st. 



Pritchard ave. 
Near Warner St. 

Westerly to building 

Northerly . 

Oliver st. 

West of Glen st. . 

Dell St. 

Angle near Tufts st. 

Southwesterly 

Near Lowell st. 

Lincoln parkway . 

Westerly 

Russell road . 

Angle thence southerly 

Northerly 

City playground 

Fountain ave. 

Northwesterly 

Broadway 

Boston ave. 
Near Boston ave. . 
S'ly thence westerly 
East Cambridge line 
Beacon st. 



Contractor. 



Bartholomew Burke 
Daniel A. Dorey . 

Day Labor 

Timothy F. Crimmings 
Daniel A. Dorey . 
Daniel A. Dorey . 
Daniel A. Dorey . 
Daniel A. Dorey . 
Day Labor . 
Daniel A. Dorey . 
Daniel A. Dorey . 
Daniel A. Dorey . 
Bartholomew Burke 
Bartholomew Burke 
James H. Fannon . 
Patrick Burke 
Patrick Burke 
Patrick Burke 
Daniel A. Dorey . 

Daniel A. Dorey . 
Bartholomew Burke 
Timothy F. Crimmings 
Richard Falvey 
Willard B. Bryne . 



ITEMS OF CONSTRUCTION AND COST. 



Material 
Excavated. 



Hardpan 
Hardpan 

Hardpan 

Hardpan and rock 

Filling . 

Filling . 

Filling . 

Filling and hardpan 

Sand and peat 

Hardpan 

Filling and clay 

Filling and clay 

Hardpan 

Hardpan and rock 

Hardpan and boulders 

Filling . 

Filling . 

Filling . 

Hardpan and rock 

Hardpan 

Filling and Hardpan 
Hardpan and Sand 
Filling and old seawall 
Sand and gravel 



8.7 
8.0 

6.2 
7.0 
7.9 
7.9 
5.8 
6.3 
5.7 

10.0 
9.0 
6.7 
9.2 
8.7 
9.8 
6.7 
6.7 
6.5 

11.0 

13.0 
6.2 
8.2 
10.4 
12.5 



238.1 
431.6 

357.0 
211.0 
241.6 
742.2 
124.8 
342.5 
125,5 

1264.0 
107.0 
382.0 
180.6 
7C3.8 
301.6 
170.0 
314.9 
534.4 

1063.0 

712.1 
491.0 
431.0 
581.9 
1400.1 



47.0 
480.0 



75.0 
659.7 
1069.0 



21,5 
8.0 



84.6 
91.9 



1.7 

30.0 

1.0 






$2.50 
1.00 



2.20 
1.65 



2.00 
2.00 
7.00 



134.00 

31.00 

30 00 
20.00 

32.00 

38.50 

38.50 

31.00 

31.00 

30.00 

35.50 

36.00 

,36.00 

34.00 

34.00 

36.00 

31.50 

31.50 

57.50 

57.50 
32.50 
33.50 
60.50 
63.00 



Pipe Sewer, Cost per Lineal Foot. 



Excavating, Re 
filling, and 
Pipe Laying. 



gs 



$0.47 
0.40 

0.40 

0.30 

0.48 

0.48 

0.30 

0.30 

0.2G 

0.57 

0.50 

0.50 

0.491 

0.46) 

0.52 

0.36 -j 

0.36 i 

0.34 J 

1.25-1 

1.26 
0.36 
0.45 
0.875 
1.48 



0.20 
0.20 
0.20 






$0.28 
0.22 

0.20 
0.18 



0.21 
0.37 

0.19 

0.23 
0.31 

0.24 



0.20 
0.29 
0.36 
0.50 



$0.04 
0.03 

0.02 
0.05 



0.08 
0.04 

0.05 

0.04 
0.05 

0.07 



$0.03 



0.04 

to. 26 



O.Oi 
0.08 
0.10 
0.12 



0.01 
0.03 



$0.01 



O.U 
0.02 
0.21 



SH4 
0.72 

0.85 
0.94 



0.84 
1.30 



1.08 
1.50 

0.94 



0,75 
1.16 

1.82 
2.81 



$270.86 
310.47 

303.26 
198.05 



105.88 
1,718.55 

47G.11 

1,019.14 
453.11 

961.13 



3C8.09 

501.10 

1,060.83 

3,930.85 



Total length and cost 



11,511.7 (2.18 miles.) 



$19,608.00 



$270.85 
305.47 



1,019.14 
186.11 



ses.oi 

414.11 



$2,686.94 



'Separate system sewers. 

tincludes cost of connecting drains and repaving sidewalk. 

^Includes relaying a portion of Knowlton street sewer. 

§Catch-basins. 



Total length of sewers built by the city, January 1, 1906 426,602.7 feet. 

Total length of private sewers in the city, January 1, 1906 34,627.0 feet. 

Total length of sewers in the city, January 1, 1906 461,229.7 feet, or 87.354 miles. (20.115 miles separate system.) 

Total length of storm drains in the city, January 1, 1906 29,598.3 feet, or 5.606 miles. 

Totallength of the city drainage system, January 1, 1906 92.960 miles. 

Total length of Met. sewerage system mains running through the city 3-368 miles. 



COMPILBD TABLB SHOWINQ LENGTH AND COST OF SEPARATE SYSTEM SEWERS CONSTRUCTED TO 1906. 



1900 

1900 

1902 

1902-'06 

1903 

1902 

1899 

1896-'05 



1900 

1896-'03 

1901 



1900 
1904 
1901 
1901 
1903 
1905 



1896 
1903 
1898-'02 



1901 

1905 

1902 

1899 

1896 

1899-'05 

1900 

1900 

1902 

1904 

1905 

1902 

1902 

1900 

1902 

1900 

1896 

1903 

1899 

1902 



1902 
1904 
1904 



1898 
1900 
1904-'05 



Adrian st. (both sides) 

Allen St. . 

Ash ave. 

Ash ave. 

Bay State ave. 

Bay State ave. 

Beach ! 



in St. (northeast side) 
Beacon st, (southwest side) 
Beckwith circle 
Bolton St. (both sides) . 
Boston ave. 
Bowdoin 



)In park 



Broadway 
Broadway 
Broadway 
Broadway 
Broadway 
Bromfield rd. . 

Clark St. and Lit 
College ave. 
Columbia st. . 
Concord ave. (north side) 
Concord ave. (north side) 
Concord ave. (south side) 
Conwell ave. . 
Dane ave, (both sides) . 
Dane St. (east side; 
Dane st. (west sidej 
Dearborn rd. . 
Dell St. (northeast side) . 
Dickinson st. (both sides) 
Dickson St. . . . 
East Albion st. 
Elmwood St. . 
Elmwood ter. 
Endicott ave. . 
Farragut ave. . 
Fountain ave. (both sides) 
Franklin st. (westerly side) 
Fremont a 
Fremont s 



St. 



St. 



Ha 

Ha 

Houghton St. (both sides) 

Jayst, . . . 

Joseph St. (both sides) 

Josephine ave. 

Kidder ave. 

Laurel St. 

Leland St. 

Lincoln parkway (south 

Linu'ood St. (both sides) 

Lowden av 

Main St. 

Mallet St. 

Malvern a\ 

Maple St. 



Ma 

Marion st. (west of Wyatt st. 

Meacham st. 

Meacham st. 

Meacham st. 

Medford st. 

Merriam st. 

Moreland st. 

Mystic ave. 

Mystic ave. . . 

Newton St. (north side) 

Newton st. (south side) 

Norfolk St. (both sides) 

North St. 

Oak St. (both sides) 

Oliver St. (southerly side) 

Palmer ave. (both sides) 

Parker st. ... 

Passageway off Broadway 



Poplar 
Porter 
Powder 
Private 



I rd. 



■t. (both sides) 
Ho. boul. (both 



Private lands . 
Private lands . 
Prospect St. 
Prospect St. (both sides) 
Raymond ave. 



iS-'Ob\ 



1901 

1902 

1900 

1898 

1904 

1900-'0.' 

1900 

1902 

1904 

1898 

1902 

1902 

1897-'04 



. (north side) 
. (south side) 
. (south side) 
. (south side) 
(both sides) 



Russell rd. 
00| SomerviUe 

Somerville 

Springfield 

Tannery brook 

Thorndike St. 

Tremont St. 

Tyler st. . 

Upland park 

Victoria St. 

Ware st. . 

Washington st. (both sides) 

Washington 

Washington 

Washington 

Waterhouse st. 

Watson St. 

Waverly st. 

Webster ave. (both sidi 

Willow ave. . 

Wilson ave, 

Winchester st, 

Woodstock St.. private 

and proposed st. . 
Wyatt cir. 
Yorktown St. . 



;. (south 
. (south : 






Joseph st 

Old sewer changed to separate 

Meacham st. 

East Albion st, 

Mallet St. 

Kidder ave. . 

Columbia st, . 

Southeast side Washi 

Kent St. 

Beacon st. 

Oak St. 

Medford li 



ington St. 



ged 



Old 
Boston 

Winchester st. 
Cedar st. . 
Willow ave. . 
Alewife brook . 
Two Penny brook 

Broadway 
Newton st. 
Private lands . 
Webster ave. 
Newton st. 
Prospect st, , 
Prospect st, , 
North st, , 
Leland st, . 
Washington St. 
Washington St. 
Boston ave. 
Glen St. . . 
Springfield st. . 
Broadway 
Ash ave. . 
Tannery Brook s( 



Woodstock St. 
Glen St. . 



Washington St. 
Old sewer changed 
Mystic ave. 
East Albion st. 
Proposed st. 
Fountain ave. . 
Yorktown st. . 
Howard St. 
Old sewer changed to 
Washingt' 



Elmwood St. 
Springfield st 
Howard st. 

Ne 



nged to 



Lowden ave. 
Somerville a' 
Washington 
Joseph St. 
Somerville a 
Near Somer 
Broadway 
Fremont st. 
Lowden ave. 
Yorktown st 
Old sewer ch 
Wyatt St. . 
Old sewer changed 
Moreland st. 
Fremont st. 
Moreland st. 
N. P. & P. Co.'s d 
Somerville ave. 
Mystic ave. 
Moreland st. 
Winthrop ave. 
Prospect St. 
Webster ave. . 
Webster ave. . 
Russell rd. 
Prospect St. 
Franklin st. 
Franklin st. 
Old sewer changed 
Broadway 

Sewer at Medford li 
Washington st. 
Somerville ave. 
Elm St. . 



Alewife brook 
Pain 



Son 



dlle i 



Webster 
North St. . 
Broadway 
Broadway 
Franklin ct. 
Opposite Poplar st. 
Laurel st. 
Prospect st 
Concord ave. 
Clarendon ave. 
Howard st. 
Webster ave. . 

Broadway 
Woodstock st 
Powder-house boul 
Lincoln park 
South side ' . 
Waverly st. 
Webster ave. . 
Woodstock St. 
Broadway 
Met. Con., at Rola 
Union sq. 
Broadway 
Broadway 
Medford line 
Metropolitan sewei 
Garrison av-. . 



separate 



separate 
separate 



railroad 



system sewer . , 

Northeasterly 

Southwesterly 

Northerly and southerly 

Northerly and southerly 

Near Webster 

Stanford ter. 

Harris St. 

Southwesterly 

Houghton st 

Pritchard ave. 

system sewer 

Willow ave. 

Cedar St. 

Southeasterly 

Bay State ave 

About 70 ft. S. E. Weston 

Near Warner st , 

Northeasterly 

Near Boston & Lowell 

Washington st 

Near Warner st . 

Near Cambridge line 

Springfield st. 

Near Concord sq. 

Springfield St. 

Near Curtis St. 

Near Dane St. 

Fitchburg railroad 

Tyler st, , , 

Near Bromfield rd. 

Angle near Tufts st 

Near Cambrii 

Northerly 

Medford line 

Southwesterly and northeasterly 

Easterly 

Southwesterly 

Broadway 

Northwesterly 

Oliver st 



Ne; 

Mair 

Near Broadway 

Dell st, , 

Near Cameron a\ 

Northeasterly 

systen 

Ne; 



East Albion st 



■ Vit 



Southwesterly 

Southeasterly 

Near Cambridge line 

Northeasterly 

Near Lincoln park 

South of Frederick ave 

Bay State ave. 

Park pi, 

Dane ave. 

Westerly 

Near Charlestown st 

Near Washington st. 

Near Fosket st 

Near Moreland st. 

Bay State ave. 

Near Cameron ave, 

system sewer 

Near Concord ave, 

system sewer 

Ash ave, 

Medford line 

Near Fremont st, 

N, E, D, M, & W, Co, 

Near Charlestown st. 

Near Heath st, . 

Fremont st, . 

Wheatland st. 

Concord ave. 

Near Concord sq. 

Near Cambridge line 

Conwell ave. 

Near Cambridge line 

West of Glen st, . 

City playground , 

system sewer 

Southwesterly 

Near Broadway 

Southerly 

Joy st, , . 

Northeasterly 

Near Curtis st 

College ave, . 

Medford st . 

North St. 

Fountain ave, 

Newton st. 

Near Cambridge line 

Southeasterly 

Near Frederick ave. 

North st 

Linden ave. . 

East Cambridge line 

Opposite Craigie . 

Malloy ct. 

Near Cambridge line 

84 ft. cast of Thorndike st. 

Southwesterly and northeasterly 

Near Cambridge line 



Southwesterly 
Near Broadway 
S'w'ly and ' ""' 
Beacon st. 
North side _ . 
Franklin st. . 
Near Fitchburg 
Near Broadway 



Ware st E. and W. 



Nea 

Washington st. . 

Near Cambridge lir 

Near Fosket st . 

Southwesterly 

Broadway 

Farragut ave. 

Westerly 

Northeasterly 



Lenqth 
Feet. 



I January 1, 1906 (20.115 miles) 



288.5 
448.5 
518.5 



911.0 
306.0 
377.3 
380.0 
370.6 
480.5 

1,847.1 
481.6 
532.0 
412.8 

1,149.6 
593.0 
797.6 
553.8 
610.0 



201.4 
478.0 
957.5 
534.4 
785.9 
89.0 



393.0 
382.0 
598.3 
2,450.7 
1,189.6 
180.7 
240.0 
333.5 
598.0 
917.0 
194.0 
215.7 
141.5 
206.0 
06.3 
499.0 



714.8 

1,158.6 

605.5 

601.4 



325.0 
733.7 
257.0 
2,359.0 
421.5 
175.5 
405.0 
314.9 



1,494.8 

3,907.9 

251.2 



791.2 
212.6 
21.5.9 
4,795.5 
997.9 
314.8 
102.7 



Cost 
Years. 



106,204.7 $181,141 49 



COnPILED TABLE SHOWING LENGTH AND COST OF STORM DRAINS CONSTRUCTED TO 1906. 



Date 
OF Con- 
struction. 



1902 

1902-'03 

1903 

1900-'03 

1897 

1897 

1898 

1898 

1898 

1898 

1898 

1898 

1898 

1900 

1900 

1898 

1898 

1899 



1902 
1896-'P9 
1904 
1903 



1903 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1898 
1898 
1898 
1899 
1904 
1901 
1901-'04 



1905 
1905 
1904 



1898-'03 

1896 

1901 

1904 

1896 

1904 

1896 

1896 

1898 



District Benefited. 



East Sotnerville District : 

Boston & Maine R. R. (marsh land) 

Middlesex ave. (tidegate chamber) 

Middlesex av. & Winthrop av. ext'n 

Mystic ave. and Winthrop ave. 

Mystic ave. 

Winthrop ave, 

W'nth'p av. (including Bell Mouth) 

Broadway 

Sargent ave. 

Sherman ct. 

Marshall st. 

Gilman sq. 

Medford st. 

School St. 

Richdale ave. 

Broadway 

Cross St. 

Otis St. 



Lowell Railroad Valley District: 

Murray st. .... 

Private lands (west of Lowell st.) 

Lowell st 

Vernon st. .... 

Somerviile Avenue District: 

Maple St. . 

Linden st. 

Merriam st. 

Allen St. . 

Prospect Hill parkway 

Union sq. . 

Bow St. . . . 

Summer st. 

School St. . 

Vine St. . . 

Somerviile ave. 

Cedar st. . 



North Somerviile District 

Pearson rd. . . 

Broadway 

Broadway 

Tannery Brook Valley District: 

Tannery Brook drain (in Camb.) . 

Tannery Brook drain 

Lex. & Arl. Branch R. R. location 

Yorktown st 

Cameron ave 

Cameron ave 

Gorham st. 

Jay St. 

Day St. 



From 



Middlesex ave. . 

Winthrop ave. extension 

B. & M. land on Middlesex 

Bell Mouth chamber 

Winthrop ave. 

Mystic ave. 

End of drain built in 1897 

Winthrop ave. 

Broadway . 

Sargent ave. 

Sherman ct. 

Marshall st. 

Gilman sq. . 

Medford st. 

School St. 

Winthrop ave. 

Broadway . 

Cross St. 



Washington st. . 

Lex. & Arl. Branch railroad 

Albion st 

Glenwood road . 



Poplar st 

Old sewer changed to storm 

Old sewer changed to storm 

Somerviile ave. 

Columbus ave. 

Washington st. 

Union sq. 

Bow st. 

Summer st. 

Somerviile ave. 

Spring St. 

Southwest of Sartwell ave. 



Two Penny brook 
Pearson rd. 
Josephine ave. 



Near Alewife brook . 
Clarendon ave. (in Cambridge) 

Holland st 

Tannery Brook drain 
Tannery Brook drain 
Tannery Brook drain 
Tannery Brook drain 
Tannery Brook drain 
Davis sq 



To 



Mystic river 

B. & M. railroad land 
Mystic ave. 

Wheatland st. 
Broadway . 
Broadway . 
Sargent ave. 
Sherman ct. 
Marshall st 
Gilman sq. . 
Medford st. 
School St. . 
Richdale ave. 
Northwest of Essex st 
Cross St. 
Pearl st. 
Westerly 



Southerly 
Hudson St. 
Hudson St. 
Trull St. 



Near Medford st 

drain 

drain 

Near Charlestown st. 

Northerly 

Bow St. 

Summ.er st. 

School St. 

Berkeley st. 

Southwesterly 

Lowell St. . 

Highland ave. 



Broadway .... 

Boston ave. 

Boston & Lowell railroad 



Clarendon ave. . 

Davis sq 

Willow ave. & Morrison ave. 
Glendale ave. 
Northerly 
Mead st. 



Northerly 
Northerly 
Westerly 



Total length and cost (5.606 miles) 



Length 



Feet. 



1,108.0 

24.0 
880.4 

58.2 

726.0 

1,268.0 

25.7 

1,648.6 



2,126.1 

451.0 

1,877.5 
375.0 



140.0 
865.0 
246.0 
372.0 



608.5 
626.0 
547.0 
557.0 
262.0 

2,080.8 

438.0 

130.0 

705.0 

1,443.2 



1,775.1 
504.0 



657.3 
3,144.0 
2,135.2 
251.0 
170.0 
614.5 
285.0 
155.0 
318.2 



29,598.3 



Cost. 



By B. & 

M. R. R. 

$2,988 60 

17,596 3-0 

2.470 82 

7,569 17 

19,241 53 

755 67 

14,566 77 



20,900 ■2(. 

532 37 

15,741 27 
174 55 



125 21 

1,853 46 

140 90 

531 42 



625 34 



1,080 23 
343 72 

18,259 94 

981 00 

222 78 

1,432 96 

5,428 96 



6,630 35 
692 54 



2,533 73 

*31,942 76 

10,031 61 

149 73 

115 72 

1,726 89 

196 24 

87 38 

360 90 



$188,032 33 



•Land damages excepted. 



Compiled Table Showing Various Forms and Sizes, Materials of Construction and Lengths of the City's Drainage System. 



Size in Inches. 



Pipe, Feet. 



. 

8 . 

9 . 
10 . 
10x12 
12 . 
12 X 12 
12 X 14 
13x16 

15 . 

14 X 18 
laVa X 20 

16 . 
16x16 
15x20 

15 X 22 

15 X 22% 
18 . 
16x21 

16 X 22 
17x17 
17x21 
16x24 
17x24 
20 . 

17 X 26 
18x24 
18x27 
20x24 
19x26 
24 . 
20x30 
24x28 
26 . 
22 X 33 
24 X 30 
28 . 
30 . 
24x36 
26x39 
36 . 
86x38 
30x45 
35x44 
40 . 
86x48 
42 . 
89x52 
48 . 

50 . 

48 X 52 . 
42x60 

51 . 
48 X 60 
54 . 
56 . 
60 . 
62 . 

48 to 84 
48x84 
66 . 
48x86 
72 . 

84 . 
78x78 

85 X 90 
96 . 

00 X 120 
104% X 111 
132 X 182 . 



6,802 

110,407 

258 

56,100 

il4;881 



124 



619 



183 



474 



Brick, 
Feet. 



17,466 
' l",762 



380 
250 
250 
18,853 
462 



851 

17,204 

10,121 

1,258 

134 

1,051 

313 

600 

13,249 

1,889 

5,417 

1,703 

5.071 

63 

1,918 

5,240 

2,645 

2,623 

8,011 

2.803 

2,873 

727 

618 

* 4,666 

444 

7,686 

725 



1,826 

l",899 

1,174 

926 

782 



1,902 

1.487 
1,219 

1^267 
1,165 

' 12 
20 



Totals . . 323,244 152,455 6,575 3,145 1,173 



Brick, 
Stone, 
Feet. 



190 
290 
335 
198 
426 

'500 



578 
875 



908 

,200 
289 
230 



556 



Brick, 

Concrete, 

Feet. 



Wood, 
Feet. 



05 



108 



Wood, 
Brick, 
Feet. 



Stone, 

Concrete, 

Feet. 



471 



87: 



Concrete, 
Feet. 



657 



900 



Stone, 
Feet. 



Iron, 
Pipe, 
Feet. 



1,343 



657 



900 



700 



1,070 



126 



266 



Total length of the city drainage system, January ], 1906, 490,828 feet, or 92.960 miles. 



CITY ENGINEER. 301 

-drains constructed ; size and materials of construction of the city's 
entire drainage system : — 

Sewers Maintenance Account. 

STATEHENT OF EXPENSES, 1905. 

Maintenance of sewers, including cleaning 

and flushing (93 miles) . . . $3,616 54 

Maintenance of catch basins, cleaning and 

flushing (1,314) 6,013 88 

Changing Hne and grade and repairing catch 

basins 719 76 

Changing line and grade and repairing 

manholes 520 40 

Inspection and location of house drains . 253 10 

New tools and supplies 428 79 

Repairs of tools and property ... 75 45 

•Sewer plan books, binding and repairing . 42 25 

Sundry expenses, car fares, telephone, etc., 52 84 

Maintenance of sewer department yards and 

buildings 288 67 

Work and materials furnished other depart- 
ments 107 08 

Total ......... . $12,118 76 

CREDIT. 

Appropriation $12,000 00 

Amounts received from other departments, 

labor, materials furnished . . . 107 08 

Sale of old hose, iron, etc 13 40 

Total $12,120 48 

'Balance unexpended . . $1 72 

Value of tools and property on hand used in maintenance 
of sewers $1,004 38 

A permanent force of men and teams are kept continually 
at work flushing, cleaning, and repairing the city's drainage sys- 
tem, the expense necessarily increasing yearly as len^hs of 
sewers, drains, and catch basins are added to the system. 

Over 9,000 cubic yards of deposit have been removed from 
the catch basins and sewers during the year, and the average cost 
per mile for cleaning and maintaining has amounted to $103.55. 

Forty-five catch basins and seventy-six manholes have been 
repaired, and grade or line changed. 

A number of repairs have been made on some of the old 
sewers, alterations made in the outlets, and overflows and extra 
manholes built for the purpose of improving the system. 

Three hundred and forty-eight permits have been issued to 
licensed drain layers for connecting buildings with the main 
•sewers, forty-eight being for repairs ; all of the work being done 



302 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

under the supervision of the city's inspector. There are to date 
about 13,115 private drain connections with the city's drainage 
system. 

Considerable miscellaneous work has been done and mate- 
rials furnished other departments during the year whenever re- 
quested, the sewer department being reimbursed for the same. 



CITY ENGINEER. 303: 



PUBLIC GROUNDS DEPARTriENT. 

At the present time there are eighteen separate parcels of 
land, located in all parts of Somerville, used for parks and play- 
grounds, amounting to sixty-four acres, and also a boulevard 
about one and one-third miles in length maintained by the city. 

The larger areas, Broadway, Central hill. Prospect hill, Lin- 
coln and Tufts parks, have been policed by regular oi^cers from 
the police department during the spring and summer months as 
the appropriation would allow, trees and shrubs added to the 
various grounds, and bulbs, plants, and flowers furnished in their 
seasons, and during the winter time ponds flooded for skating 
when the weather was favorable. 

Six fields have been maintained for baseball and three for 
football playing, and are constantly in use by the various athletic 
teams, and the outdoor gymnasium, bicycle track, and tennis 
courts have been a source of much enjoyment. 

Additional seats have been built on the enclosed athletic 
field in West Somerville during the year, at the expense of the 
High School Athletic Association, making a total seating capacity 
for nearly 5,500 people, and a raised inclining platform was con- 
structed, accommodating an additional 3,000 people ; this plat- 
form is removable. 

On Thanksgiving day, at a football game between teams 
representing the Somerville and Cambridge high schools, there 
were over 9,000 people in attendance. 

A portion of the cost of maintaining this field should be paid 
for by the High School Association, as admission is charged to 
these contests. 

The playground located at the corner of Broadway and 
Cedar street has been completely graded, and the slopes along 
the streets will be planted with shrubs and trees in the early 
spring. 

Wyatt's clay pit in Lincoln park has been completely filled, 
and during the coming year this park can be laid out and com- 
pleted as originally designed. 

Trees of the Bolleana poplar variety have been planted on 
both sides of the Powder-house boulevard, extending from Curtis 
street westerly to the end of this roadway, near Mystic river; 
also there was a small balance left over on construction account, 
which was used during the year in grading the grass plots, slopes, 
and sidewalks northwest of North street, amounting to $369.30. 

Playgrounds, where the land is owned by private parties and 
turned over to the city for use, have been maintained in the fol- 



304 



ANNUAL EEPOKTS. 



lowing localities : On Winthrop avenue (Fellsway east), 2.5 acres ; 
on Knowlton street, 1.5 acres; corner Highland avenue and 
Cedar street, 1.8 acres; and there are a number of vacant lots of 
land in different sections of the city, owned by private parties, 
large enough for the purpose of establishing recreation grounds 
and breathing spaces, which undoubtedly could be obtained for 
short term leases by payment of the taxes to the owner of the 
property, and be of great benefit to thousands of children in the 
congested parts of the city. 



Maintenance Account. 

STATEHENT OF EXPENSES. 

Broadway Park (15.9 acres): — 
Maintenance of grounds and general care 

of property $1,120 67 

Removing brown-tail and gypsy moths . 36 00 

Tools and supplies 78 29 

Repairing tools and property ... 74 53 

Plants, flowers, bulbs, etc. ... 156 77 



Broadway Parkway (1.4 acres): — 
Maintenance of grounds . . . . 
Plants, flowers, trees, etc 

Central Hill Park (13.1 acres):— 
Maintenance of grounds and general care 

of property 

Removing brown-tail and gypsy moths 
Tools and supplies .... 
Repairing tools and property 
Repairing roadways .... 
Plants, flowers, bulbs, etc. 

Prospect Hill Park (2.6 acres) :— 
Maintenance of grounds .... 
Tools and supplies . . . 
Repairing tools and property 
Trees and shrubs 

Lincoln Park (8.8 acres):— 
Maintenance of grounds and general care 
of property . . . . * . 

Tools and supplies 

Repairing tools and property . 

Plants, flowers, etc. . . . . . 

Tufts Park (4,5 acres): — 

Maintenance of grounds and general care 

of property 

Removing brown-tail and gypsy moths 
Tools and supplies .... 
Repairing tools and property 
Plants, flowers, bulbs, etc. 



$101 50 
98 73 



$1,102 81 

24 00 

33 15 

109 18 

116 42 

400 85 



$1,032 15 

46 82 

117 39 

32 38 



$1,374 88 

59 77 

128 13 

55 75 



$929 67 

27 00 

27 80 

13 04 

267 26 



$1,466 26 



200 23 



1,786 41 



1,228 74 



1,618 53 



1,264 77 



Amount carried forward 



$7,564 94 



CITY ENGINEER. 305 

Amount brought forward $7,564 94 

Paul Revere Park: — 

Maintenance of grounds 14 41 

Broadway Athletic Field, Tufts College land 
(4.4 acres) : — 

Maintenance of grounds and care of 

property . . . . . . $629 83 

Building new seats (High School Associa- 
tion) . 545 83 

Tools and supplies 32 29 

Repairing property 3 05 

Playgrounds, Glen street, corner Oliver 
street (0.9 acre + 1.5 acres leased) : — 
Maintenance of grounds 

Playgrounds, Poplar street, corner Joy 
street (0.4 acre) : — 
Maintenance 

Playgrounds, Webster avenue, near Cam- 
bridge line (0.2 acre) : — 
Maintenance of grounds 

Playgrounds, Winthrop avenue (2.5 acres 
leased): — 
Maintenance 

Playgrounds, Highland avenue, at Cedar 
street (1.8 acres leased) : — 
Maintenance 130 41 

Playgrounds, Somerville avenue, corner 
Kent street (0.8 acre) : — 
Maintenance of grounds .... $31 88 

Repairing property 55 44 



Playgrounds, Belmont street, near Summer 
street (0.4 acre) : — 
Maintenance of grounds .... $47 65 

Plants, flowers, bulbs, etc. . . . 125 50 



Playgrounds, Broadway, corner Cedar 
street (4.2 acres) : — 
Maintenance of grounds .... $73 19 

Completion, grading westerly part of field, 594 42 

Trees and shrubs for slopes . . . 393 75 



1,211 00 


35 37 


52 62 


8 00 


12 25 



87 32 



173 15 



1,061 36 



Playgroufids, College avenue, opposite 
Morrison avenue (0.4 acre): — 
Maintenance of grounds 14 25 

Cemetery, Somerville avenue (0.7 acre): — 

Maintenance of grounds 36 75 

Powder-house boulevard (1 1-3 miles 
long):— 
Maintenance of roadway and walks . . $384 45 

Trees and planting 173 02 

557 47 

Incidentals 39 00 



Total expenditure, maintenance (64 acres, 1 i-3 miles 
boulevard) $10,998 30 



306 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



CREDIT. 

Appropriation $10,500 00 

Transferred from other departments (labor), 45 00 
Amount received from High School Ath- 
letic Association 452 53 

Sale of old mower 1 00 

Total $10,998 53 

Balance unexpended $0 23 

Value of tools and property used in main- 
tenance of grounds .... $1,500 00 

Amount expended on construction account. 

Powder-house boulevard . . . $369 30 



APPENDED TABLE. 

Following this report is a table giving names of all streets 
in the city, public and private, lengths, widths, and the total 
mileage ; in the 1901 report a table was given showing the loca- 
tions and names of public squares in the city, and in the 1898 
report old names of certain streets as formerly known. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ernest W. Bailey, 

City Engineer. 



CITY ENGINEEK. 






TABLE SHOWING THE LOCATION, LENGTH AND WIDTH OF 
PUBLIC AND PRIVATE STREETS. 













Length. 








Public 


Width 






Street. 


From 


To 


or 


in 








Private. 


Feet. 
















Public. 


Private. 


Abdellpl. . . 


Somerville ave. . 


Southwesterly . 


Private. 


25 




203 


Adams . 




Broadway . . . 


Medford st. . . 


. Public. 


40 


"967 


.... 


Addison pi. 




Somerville ave. 


. Southwesterly . 


Private. 


20 




150 


Adrian . 




Marion st. . . 


Joseph St. . . 


. Public. 


40 


'579 




Albion pi. 




Albion St. . . . 


Northeasterly . 


Private. 


10 




'iee 


Albion ct. 




Albion St. . . . 


Southwesterly . 


Private. 


16 




116 


Albion . 




Central st. . . 


Cedar st. . . 


. Public. 


40 


2^742 




Albion . 




Broadway . . . 


Medford line . 


Private. 


50 


... 


"ioo 


Albion ter. 




Albion St. . . . 


Southwesierly . 


Private. 


25 




100 


Aldersey 




Walnut St. . . 


Vinal ave. . . 


. Public. 


40 


"508 


.... 


Aldrich . 




Pearl st. . . . 


B. &L. R. R. . 


. Public. 


40 


611 




Alfred . 




Broadway . . . 


Medford line 


Private. 


50 




"50 


Allen . 




Somerville ave. . 


Charlestown st. 


Private. 


25 




680 


Allen ct. 




Park St. ... 


Northwesterly . 


Private. 


20 


. . - » 


150 


Alpine . 




Cedar st. . . . 


Southeasterly . 


Private. 


30 




670 


Alpine . 




Alpine st. . . 


Lowell St. . . 


. Public. 


40 


'688 


.... 


Alston . 




Cross St. . . . 


Shawmut pi. 


. Public. 


40 


567 




Ames 




Bartlett st. . . 


Robinson st. 


. Public. 


40 


580 




Appleton 




Willow ave. . . 


Clifton St. . . 


. Public. 


40 


548 




Appleton 




Clifton St. . . 


Liberty ave. 


Private. 


40 




'126 


Arlington 




Franklin st. . . 


Lincoln st. . 


. Public. 


40 


452 




Arnold ave. 




Porter st. . . . 


Southeasterly . 


Private. 


15 




'127 


Arnold ct. 




Beacon st. . . 


Northeasterly . 


Private. 


10 




115 


Arthur ct. 




Linden st. 


Easterly . . . 


Private. 


about 10 




100 


Arthur . . 




Broadway . . . 


Bonair st. . . 


. Public. 


40 


'438 




Ash ave. 




Meacham st. 


Northeasterly . 


Private. 


40 




'705 


Ashland . . 




Summer st. . 


Sartwell ave. 


. Public. 


30 


'478 




Atherton 




Central st. . . 


Beech st. . . 


. Public. 


40 


264 




Auburn ave. 




Cross St. . . . 


B. & L. R. R. . 


Private. 


30 




m 


Austin . , 




Broadway . . . 


Mystic ave. . . 


. Public. 


40 


"716 




Autumn . . 




Broadway . . . 


Bonair st. . . 


Private. 


20 




'420 


Avon . . . 




School St. . . 


Central st. . . 


. Public. 


40 


1,360 




Avon pi. 




Cross St. . . . 


B. & L. R. R. . 


Private. 


25 




'156 


Banks . . 




Elm St. ... 


Summer st. . . 


Public. 


40 


639 




Bartlett . . 




Vernon st. . . 


Broadway . . 


Public. 


40 


1,550 




Bartlett . . 




Washington st. . 


Southerly . . 


Private. 


20 




'260' 


Barton . . 




Broadway 


Russell road. . 


Private. 


40 




38-2 


Bay State ave. 


Broadway . . . 


Fosket St. . . 


Private. 


40 




1,197 


Beach ave. . . 


Webster ave. 


Columbia st. 


Private. 


about 20 




200 


Beacon pi. . . . 


Beacon st. . . 


Northeasterly . 


Private. 


15 




200 


Beacon . , . . 


Cambridge line . 


Somerville ave. 


Public. 


66 


6',Cl67 




Beacon ter. . . 


Somerville ave. . 


Northeasterly . 


Private. 


24 




'iio 


Bean's ct. , . . 


Cutter St. . . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


16 




100 


Beckwith circle . 


Beacon st. . . 


Southwesterly . 


Private. 


20 




120 


Bedford . . . . 


South St. . . . 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


30 


165 




Beech . . . . 


Somerville ave. . 


Spring St. . . . 


Public. 


40 


800 





Bellevue ter. . . 


Albion St. . . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


20 




90' 


Belknap .... 


Broadway . . . 


Russell road. . . 


Private. 


40 





449' 


Belmont . . . 


Somerville ave. . 


Highland ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


2,192 




Belmont pi. . . 


Belmont st. . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


25 




"175 


Benedict ave. 


Broadway . . . 


Benedict st. . . . 


Private. 


20 




200 


Benedict . . . 


Union st. . 


Austin St. . . . 


Public. 


40 


'585 




Bennett ct. . . 


Bennett st. . . 


Prospect St. . . 


Private. 


10 




'ioo 


Bennett . . . . 


Prospect St. . . 


Bennett ct. . . . 


Private. 


40 to 25 




400 


Benton road . . 


Summer st. . 


Hudson St. . . . 


Public. 


40 


1,208 




Berkeley . . . 


School St. . . . 


Central st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


1,360 




Berwick .... 


Lawrence st. 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


20 




'176 


Bigelow .... 


Boston St. . . . 


Monroe st. . . . 


Public. 


50 


'208 




Billingham . . . 


Broadway . . . 


William st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


563 





Bishop's pi. . . 


Glen St. . . . 


Easterly . . . . 


Private. 


10 




*75 


Blakeley ave. . . 


Winthrop ave. . 


Cross st 


Private. 


40 


.... 


630 


Bleachery ct. . . 


Somerville ave. . 


Fitchburg R. R. . 


Private. 


30 




450 


Bolton .... 


Oak St. . . 


Houghton St. . . 


Public. 


40 


476 




Bonair .... 


Cross St. . . . 


Walnut St. . . . 


Public. 


40 


1,535 


.... 


Bond 


Broadway . . . 


Jaques st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


655 




Bonner ave. . . 


Washington st. . 


Columbus ave. 


Public. 


.0 


37G 


.... 



308 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 



Street. 



From 



To 



Public 

or 
Private. 



Width 

in 
Feet. 



Length. 



Public. Private 



Boston ave. 
Boston ave . 
Boston ave. 
Boston ave. 
Boston ave. 
Boston . . 
Boston . . 
Bow . . . 
Bow . . . 
Bowdoin 
Bowers ave. 
Bow St. pi. 
Bradford ave. 
Bradley . . 
Brastow ave. 
Bristol road 
Broadway . 
Broadway . 
Broadway . 
Broadway . 
Broadway , 
Broadway . 
Broadway . 
Broadway . 
Broadway pi. 
Bromfield road 
Brook . . 
Browning road 
Buckingham 
Burnside ave 



Caldwell ave. 
Calvin . . 
Calvin , . 
Cambria 
Cameron ave. 
Campbell pk. 
Campbell Pk. pi. 
Carlton . 
Carver . 
Cedar ave. 
Cedar ct. 
Cedar St. pi. 
Cedar St. pi. 
Cedar 
Central . 
Central . 
Central . 
Centre . 
Chandler 
Chapel . 
Chapel ct. 
Charles . 
Charlestown 
Charnwood road 
♦Chelsea 
Cherry . 
Chester . 
Chester ave. 
Chester ave. 
Chester pi. 
Chestnut 
Church 
Church St. 
Claremon 



pi. 



Medford line 
Broadway . . 
Broadway 
Highland road 
Angle southerly 
Washington st. 
Prospect Hill av 
Union sq. 
Wesley sq. 
Washington st 
Cottage ave. 
Bow St. 
School St. 
Pearl st. . 
Lowell St. 
Broadway . 
Charlestown line 
Cross St. . 
Marshall st. 
Main st. . 
Top of hill 
Albion St. . 
Willow ave. 
Paulina st. 
Broadway 
Warner st. 
Glen St. . 
Sycamore st. 
Beacon st. 
Elm St. . 

Washington st. 
Beacon st. 
Dimick st. 
Central st. 
Holland st. 
Meacham rd 
Kingston st. 
Somerville ave. 
Porter st. . 
Cedar st. . 
Cedar St. . 
Murdock st. 
Cedar n'r Elm st 
Elm St. 
Somerville ave 
Summer st. 
Medford st. 
Albion St. 
Park ave. . 
College ave. 
Sycamore st. 
Washington st. 
Allen St. . 
Willow ave. 
Mystic ave. 
Elm St. 
Elm St. 
Medford st. 
Angle . . 
Chester st. 
Poplar St. 
Summer st. 
Church St. 
Holland st. 



Mystic river 
Medford line 
Highland road 
Easterly angle 
Morrison ave. 
Prospect Hill ave 
Walnut St. . 
Wesley sq. . 
Somerville ave. 
Lincoln park 
Elm St. . . 
Northwesterly 
Southeasterly 
Walter st. . 
Porter st. 
Medford line 
Cross St. . . 
Marshall st. 
Main st. . . 
Top of hill . 
Albion St. 
Willow ave. 
Paulina st. . 
Arlington line 
Southwesterly 
Dearborn road 
Cross St. . 
Central st. . 
Dimick st. 
Summer st. . 

Southerly 
Dimick st. . 
Washington st. 
Benton road 
Cambridge line 
Kingston st. 
Arlington Br. R 
Lake st. . . 
Northwesterly 
Linden ave. 
Southeasterly 
Southwesterly 
Southeasterly 
Broadway 
Summer st. . 
Medford st. . 
Broadway 
B. & L. R. R. 
Broadway 
Chandler st. 
Northwesterly 
Southerly 
Easterly . . 
Hancock st. . 
Melrose st. . 
Highland ave. 
Cambridge line 
Angle . . 
Cross St. . . 
Northwesterly 
Southeasterly 
Lake st. . . 
Northwesterly 
Mead st. . . 



R 



Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Priv^ate. 

Public. 



60 


915 


50 


80 


65 


.... 


50 




40 





45 


640 


40 


1,242 


60 


658 


50 


570 


40 


341 


24 





40 




40 




40 


762 


40 


686 


40 




100 


2,590 


100 to 200 


2,060 


100 


1,570 


100 to 90 


1,030 


00 


2,540 


90 to 70 


1,030 


70 


3,250 


65-60-65 
22 
40 


3,220 




40 


504 


40 


679 


40 


292 


40 


720 


20 




40 




30 




40 


488 


60 


1,065 


• 4a 


399 


20 


• . . • 


40 


300 


40 





22 




15+ 


.... 


20 


.... 


12+ 


.... 


40 


4,137 


33 


1,043 


40 


2,539 


45 


1,079 


35 





40 


1,232 


40 


273 


12 




30 


166 


15 




40 


589 


50 





45 


1,450 


40 


885 


about 22 


220 


20 


• • . • 


40 


. • . . 


40 




40 


964 


25 




40 


560 



290 

655 

1,0:^5 



288 
300 
150 



98 



250 
1,260 



210 
250 
395 



84 

156 
290 

70+ 
220 

80+ 



200 

130 
400 

390 



445 
200 
540 

iii) 



* Proposed . 



CITY ENGINEEE. 



300 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 
Private Streets. — Continued. 













Length. 


Street, 


From 


To 


Public 


Width 






or 


in 












Private. 


Feet. 


Public. 


Private. 


Clarendon ave. . 


Broadway . . • 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


1,217 




Clark 


Newton st. . • 


Lincoln parkway . 


Private. 


35 




'545 


Cleveland . 




. Central st. . • 


Elm pi 


Private. 


40 


• ■ ■ ■ 


270 


Clifton . . 




Appleton St. . • 


Morrison ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


200 


.... 


Clifton . . 




Morrison ave. 


Arlington Br. R.R. 


Private. 


40 




220 


Clyde . . 




Cedar st. . . • 


Murdock st. . . 


Private. 


30 




600 


College ave. 




Davis sq. . . • 


Medford line . . 


Public. 


60 


4^080 




Columbia . 




Webster ave. 


Cambridge line 


Public 


40 


816 


• « • • 


Columbia ct. 




Columbia st. 


Webster ave. . . 


Private. 


9 




150 


Columbus ave 




Washington st. . 


Walnut St. . . , 


Public. 


40 


ll425 


• . . • 


Concord ave? 




Prospect st. . . 


Leon St 


Public. 


40 


1,483 


. . • • 


Concord ave. 




Leon St. . . . 


Beacon st. . . . 


Private. 


30 


• • . • 


470 


Congress pi. 




Linwood st. . . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


16 




200 


Co'nlon ct. . 




Columbia st. . . 


Easterly . . . . 


Private. 


20 




200 


Conwell ave. 




Curtis St. . , . 


North St. ... 


Private. 


40 


• • • • 


1,349 


Conwell . . 




Highland ave. . 


Southwesterly . . 


Public. 


35 


363 


• • * • 


Cooney . 




Beacon st. . . 


Line st 


Private. 


30 




220 


Cottage ave- 




Russell St. . . 


Chester st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


'550 


.... 


Cottage circle 




Cottage ave. . . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


25 




87 


Cottage pi. 




Washington st. . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


about 11 




150 


Craigie . . 




Somerville ave. . 


Summer st. . . . 


Public. 


50 


l',280 


.... 


Craigie ter. 




16 Craigie st. 


Westerly .... 


Private. 


25 




126 


Crescent 




Washington st . 


Pearl st 


Private. 


30 to 38 




660 


Crocker . . 




Highland ave. . 


Crown St. ... 


Public. 


40 


*528 


• • • • 


Cross . . 




Medford st. . . 


Broadway . . . 


Public. 


45 


2,680 


• . . . 


Cross . . 




Broadway . . 


Mystic ave. . . . 


Public. 


40 


1,100- 




Cross St. pi. 




Cross St. . . . 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


24 




150 


Crown . . 




Porter st. . , . 


Lowell St. ... 


Private. 


30 




700 


Curtis ave. 




Curtis St. . . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


40 




700 


Curtis . , 




Broadway . . 


Medford line . . 


Public. 


40 


2',357 




Cutler . . 




Lawrence st. 


Northwesterly . 


Private. 


20 




'iio 


Cutter ave. 




Summer st. . . 


Highland ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


*480 




Cutter pk. , 




Cutter ave. . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


12 




"*83 


Cutter . . 




Broadway 


Webster st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


"736 


.... 


Cypress 




Central st. . . 


Beech st. ... 


Public. 


40 


262 




Dana . . . 




Bonair st. . . 


Pearl st 


Public. 


40 


696 




Dane . . . 




Somerville ave. . 


Washington st. 


Public. 


40 


1,341 




Dane ave. . , 




Dane st. . •. . 


Iceland st. ... 


Public. 


30 


569 


.... 


Dartmouth 




Medford st. . . 


Broadway 


Public. 


40 


1,465 


.... 


Day .... 




Elm St. ... 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


908 




Dearborn roac 




Boston ave. . . 


College ave. . . 


Private. 


50 


• . . . 


'460 


Delaware . . 




Aldrich st. . . 


' Pearl st 


Public. 


40 


451 




Dell .... 




Glen St. ... 


Tufts st 


Public. 


40 


466 




Derby . . . 




Temple st. . . 


Grant st. ... 


Public. 


40 


831 




Derby . . . 




Grant st. . . . 


Wheatland st. . . 


Private. 


40 


.... 


'260 


Dexter . . . 




Broadway . . 


Medford line 


Private. 


50 




25 


Dickinson . . 




Springfield st. . 


Beacon st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


'770 




Dickson . . . 




Broadway . . . 


Fairmount ave. 


Private. 


40 


.... 


'271 


Dimick . . . 




Concord ave. 


Calvin st. ... 


Public. 


40 


957 




Distillhouse . 




South St. . . . 


Cambridge line 


Private. 


35 




150 


Dix pi. . . . 




Linwood st. , . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


10 




100 


Dover . . . 




Elm St. ... 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


'975 




Downer pi. 




Downer st. . . 


B. & L. R. R. . . 


Private. 


20 




'125 


Downer . . , 




Nashua st. . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


20 




120 


Dresden circle 




Cutter ave. . . 


Westerly .... 


Private. 


30 




133 


Durham . . . 




Beacon st. . . 


Hanson st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


423 


.... 


Dynamo . . . 




Willow ave. . . 


Whipple St. . . . 


Private. 


30 




255 


Earle . . . 




South St. . . . 


Fitchburg R. R. . 


Private. 


30 




C22 


East Albion . 




Mt. Vernon ave. 


E. of Moreland st. 


Private. 


25 




188 


East Albion . 




E. of Morelandst. 


Medford line 


Private. 


40 




490 


Eastman road . 




Highland ave. . 


Southwesterly . . 


Public. 


40 


296 




*Edgeworth . 




Mystic ave. . . 


Melrose st. . . . 


Private. 


50 




I'iso 


Edmands . . 




Broadway . . 


Bonair st. 


Public. 


40 


'462 




Edmonton ave. 




Cross St. . , . 


Winthrop ave. . 


Private. 


40 




'630 


Electric ave. . 

^ — 




Curtis St. . . . 


Packard ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


'esi 


.... 



•Proposed. 



310 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 













Length. 


Street. 


From 


To 


Public 


Width 






or 


in 












Private. 


Feet. 


Public. 


Private. 


Eliot 


Vine St. ... 


Park st 


Public. 


40 


291 




Ellington road 


Highland ave. . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


35 




'126 


Ellington road 


West St. . . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


30 




405 


Ellsworth . . . 


Cross St. . . . 


Rush st 


Public. 


40 


'230 


.... 


Elm ct 


Villa ave. . . . 


Northwesterly . , 


Private. 


18 


.... 


70 


Elm pi 


Harvard st. . . 


Easterly & west'ly 


Private. 


3;) 




400 


Elm 


Somerville ave. . 


Cherry st. . . . 


Pubhc. 


63 


1^672 


.... 


Elm 


Cherry st. . . 


White St. ... 


Public. 


C3 to 60 


330 


.... 


Elm 


White St. . . . 


Banks st. ... 


Public. 


60 


660 




Elm 


Banks st. . . . 


Beech st. . . 


Public. 


CO to 77.5 


290 


. . . 


Elm 


Beech st. . . . 


Tenney st. . . . 


Public. 


77.5 to 60 


570 


.... 


Elm 


Tenney st. . . 


Davis sq. ... 


Public. 


60 


1 ,429 


.... 


Elmwood . . . 


Holland st. . . 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


1,057 




Elmwood ter. . . 


Elmwood St. . . 


Easterly .... 


Private. 


20 




'190 


Elston .... 


Elm St. ... 


Summer st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


390 


.... 


Emerson . . . 


Everett st. . . 


Newton st. . . . 


Private. 


30 




170 


Emery .... 


Fitchburg R. R. 


South St. ... 


Private. 


30 


.... 


335 


Endicott ave. 


Broadway 


Woodstockst.(Ext'n) 


Private. 


40 




800 


Essex .... 


Medford st. . . 


Richdale ave. . . 


Public. 


4') 


232 


.... 


Eustis .... 


Beacon st. . . 


Cambridge line 


Private. 


30 




150 


Everett ave. . . 


Cross St. . . . 


Dana st 


Public. 


40 


845 


.... 


Everett .... 


Webster ave. 


Newton st. . . . 


Private. 


■AO 




350 


Evergreen ave. . 


Marshall st. . . 


Sycamore st. . . 


Public. 


40 


1,320 




Evergreen sq. 


Porter st. . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


8 




'260 


Fairlee .... 


Cherry st. . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Public. 


30 


144 




Fairmount ave. . 


Curtis St. . . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


40 


.... 


700 


Fairview ter. . . 


Sycamore st. . . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


15 




173 


Farragut ave. 


Broadway . . 


Woodstock St. (Ext'n) 


Public. 


40 


905 




Fellsway . . . 


Mystic ave. . . 


Mystic river . . 


Public. 


70 to 130 


2,500 




Fellsway east . . 














(Winthrop ave.) 


Broadway . . . 


Mystic ave. . . . 


Public. 


50 


1,222 





Fellsway west 














(Chaunceyave.) 


Broadway . . . 


Mystic ave. . • . 


Public. 


50 


1,324 


.... 


Fenwick . . . 


Broadway . . 


Jaques st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


601 


.... 


Fisk ave. . . . 


Hinckley st. 


Lowell St. ... 


Private. 


20 and 25 




460 


Fitchburg ct. . . 


Fitchburg st. 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


10 




225 


Fitchburg . . . 


Linwood st. . . 


B. & L. R. R. . . 


Private. 


40 




400 


Flint ave. . . . 


Flint St. . . . 


Northerly . . . 


Private. 


40 




200 


Flint 


Franklin st. . . 


Aldrich st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


1,790 





Florence . . . 


Washington st. . 


Perkins st. . . . 


PubUc. 


40 


1,304 




Florence ter. . . 


Jaques st. . . 


Southwesterly . 


Private. 


20 




90 


Forest . . . . 


Beacon st. . . 


Cambridge line 


-Public. 


40 


ill 


.... 


Forster .... 


Sycamore st. 


Central st. . . . 


Private. 


30 




430 


Fosket .... 


Willow ave. . . 


Liberty ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


668 





Fountain ave. 


Cross St. . . . 


Glen st 


Public. 


30 


578 


.... 


Francesca ave. . 


College ave. 


Liberty ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


762 





Francis .... 


Porter st. . . . 


Conwell St. . . . 


Private. 


30 




180 


Franklin ave. 


Washington st. . 


Franklin st. . . . 


Private. 


20 




500 


Franklin pi. . . 


Franklin st. . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


15 




100 


Franklin . . . 


Broadway 


Washington st. 


Public. 


40+ 


2,316 




Frederick ave. 


Willow ave. . . 


Boston ave. . . 


Private. 


40 




1,217 


Fremont ave. 


Bowdoin st. . . 


Lincoln pk. . . 


Private. 


30 




235 


Fremont . . . 


Main st. . . . 


Meacham St. . . 


Public. 


40 


'612 




Fremont . , . 


Meacham st. . . 


Near Mystic ave. . 


Private. 


40 




785 


Frost ave. . . . 


Somerville ave. . 


Dane st. . . , . 


Private. 


35 




550 


Carden ct. . . 


Somerville ave. . 


Fitchburg R. R. . 


Private. 


25 


.... 


370 


Garfield ave. . . 


Broadway . . 


Middlesex ave. 


Private. 


40 




1,430 


Garrison ave. . . 


Broadway . . 


Woodstock St. (Ext'n) 


Private. 


40 




850 


George .... 


Broadway . . 


Lincoln ave. 


Public. 


30 


275 


.... 


Gibbens . . . 


Central st. . . 


Benton road . . . 


Public. 


40 


492 


.... 


Gibbens . . . 


Benton rd. . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


40 





133 


Giles pk. . . . 


Walnut St. . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


32.71 





168 


Gill's ct. . . . 


Franklin st, . . 


Westerly .... 


Private. 


10 




100 


Gilman .... 


Cross St. . . . 


Walnut St. . . . 


PubUc. 


40 


1,430 





CITY en"gine:ee. 



311 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 
Private Streets. — Continued. 













Length. 


Strbet. 


From 


To 


Public 


Width 






or 


in 


1 










Private. 


Feet. 


Public. 


Private. 


Gilman ter. . . 


Pearl st. . . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Public. 


40 


360 




Gilson ter. . . 


Linden ave. . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


20 




"124 


Glen 


Broadway . . . 


Tufts st 


Public. 


40 


2',373 




Glendale ave. . . 


Cameron ave. 


Yorktown st. 


Public. 


40 


410 




Glenwood road . 


Vernon st. . . 


Broadway . . . 


Public. 


40 


1,524 




Glover circle . . 


Meacham road . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


20 


• • • . 


'lib 


Gorham .... 


Holland st. . . 


Howard st . . . 


Public. 


40 


763 





Gould ave. . . . 


Porter st. . . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


16 


.... 


156 


Gove ct ... 


Cedar st. . . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


15 


.... 


145 


Grand View ave. 


Walnut St. . . 


Vinal ave. . . . 


Public. 


40 


542 


• . . . 


Granite .... 


Somerville ave. 


Osgood St. . . . 


Private. 


40 


• . . • 


400 


Grant .... 


Broadway . . . 


Jaques st. ... 


Public. 


40 


536 


.... 


Grant .... 


Jaques st. . . 


Mystic ave. . . . 


Private. 


40 




814 


Greene .... 


Summer st. . . 


Laurel st. ... 


Public. 


40 


*555 


.... 


Greenville . . . 


Medford st. . . 


Munroe st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


660 




Greenville ter. 


Greenville st. 


Northerly . . . 


Private. 


20 




'256 


Greenwood ter. . 


Beacon st. . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private 


25 




165 


Grove .... 


Elm St. ... 


Morrison ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


"996 




Hadley ct. . . . 


Franklin st. . . 


Westerly .... 


Private. 


20 


.... 


159 


Hall ave. . . . 


College ave. . . 


Liberty ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


926 




Hall 


Cedar st. . . . 


Cherry st. ... 


Public. 


30 


456 




Hamlet .... 


Highland ave. . 


Southwesterly . . 


Public. 


30 


451 


• . • • 


Hammond . . . 


Dickinson st. 


Concord ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


267 


• • • • 


Hancock . . . 


Elm St. ... 


Highland ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


1,349 


. • . • 


Hancock . . . 


Highland ave. . 


Lexington ave. 


Public. 


50 


376 





Hanson ave. . . 


Hanson St. . . 


Easterly .... 


Private. 


30 




252 


Hanson .... 


Washington st. . 


Skehan st. . . . 


Public. 


30 


'469 




Hanson . . . 


Skehan st. . . 


Vine st 


Public. 


35 


347 




Harcourt . . . 


Dimickst. . . 


Harold st. . . . 


Private. 


40 


.... 


'285 


Harding . . . 


South St. . . . 


Cambridge line 


Private. 


30 





115 


Harold .... 


Dimick st. . . 


Northerly . . . 


Private. 


40 




429 


Harris .... 


Beacon st. . . 


Cambridge line 


Private. 


35 




150 


Harrison . . . 


Ivaloo St. . . . 


Kent st 


Public. 


40 


644 




Harrison . - . 


Elmwood St. 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


40 




'216 


Harvard pi. . . 


Harvard st. . . 


Westerly .... 


Private. 


35 




200 


Harvard . . . 


Summer st. . . 


Beech st 


Public. 


40 


'717 




Hathorn . . . 


Broadway 


Arlington st. . . 


Public. 


40 


339 


.... 


Hawkins . . . 


Somerville ave. . 


Washington st. 


Public. 


40 


330 




Hawthorne . . 


Willow ave. . . 


Cutter ave. . . . 


Public. 


30 


807 




Hayden ter. . . 


Linden ave. . . 


Easterly .... 


Private. 


20 




'126 


Heath .... 


Temple st. 


Bond st 


Public. 


45 


1,043 


.... 


Heath . . . . 


Bond st . . . . 


Moreland st. . . 


Private. 


40 




750 


Henderson . . 


Richardson st. . 


B. & L. R. R. . . 


Private. 


20 




535 


Hennessy ct. . . 


Medford St. . . 


Fisk ave. . . . 


Private. 


20 




250 


Henrietta ct. . . 


Somerville ave. . 


Northerly . . . 


Private. 


8 and 20. 


• . . • 


161 


Henry ave. . . 


Highland ave. . 


Lexington ave. 


Public. 


40 


290 


.... 


Herbert .... 


Chester st. . . 


Day st 


Public. 


40 


337 




Hersey .... 


Berkeley st. . . 


Oxford St. ... 


Private. 


40 




'230 


Highland ave. 


Medford st. . . 


Davis sq. ... 


Public. 


60 


9',i35 




Highland road 


Morrison ave. . 


Boston ave. . . 


Private. 


70 


• • • • 


I'.sbb 


Hill 


Broadway . . 


Fairmount ave. 


Private. 


40 





2S6 


Hillside ave. . . 


Pearl st. . . . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


30 


. . • • 


150 


Hillside cir. . . 


Craigie st. . . 


Westerly .... 


Private. 


16 




151 


Hillside pk. . . 


Walnut St. . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Public. 


40 


'i96 




Hinckley . . . 


Broadway . . 


Lawrence st. . . 


Private. 


30 


, , . , 


'43b 


Hodgdonpl. . . 


Dane ave. . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


about 20 




150 


Holland . . . . 


Davis sq. . . . 


Broadway . . . 


Public. 


60 


2!696 




Holt's ave. . . 


Oak St. ... 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


10 




'ibb 


Holyoke road . . 


Elm St. ... 


Elm St. ... 


Public. 


40 


'637 




Homer sq. . . . 


Bonner ave. . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Public. 


30+ 


200 




Horace . . . . 


South St. . . . 


Fitchburg R. R. . 


Private. 


30 


.... 


'510 


Houghton . . . 


Springfield St. . 


Cambridge line. . 


Public 


40 


653 




Howard . . . 


Thorndike st. 


Gorham street . 


Private. 


40 




'43b 


Howe . . . . 


Marshall st. . . 


School St. ... 


Public. 


40 


'445 





312 



ANNUAL EEPOKTS. 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 













Length. 


Stkeet. 


From 


To 


Public 


Width 






or 


in 












Private. 


Feet. 


Public. 


Private .^ 


Hudson . . . 


Central st. . . 


Cedar st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


2,760 




Hunting . . , 


South St. . . . 


Cambridge line 


Private. 


30 




i'is 


Ibbetson . . . 


Somerville ave. 


Lowell St. . . . 


Public. 


40 


802 


.... 


Irving .... 


Holland st. . . 


Broadway . . . 


Public. 


40 


1,180 


.... 


Ivaloo .... 


Beacon st. . . 


Park st 


Public. 


40 


685 


.... 


James .... 


Pearl st. . . . 


Veazie st. ... 


Public. 


40 


320 




Jaques .... 


Chauncey ave. . 


Temple st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


1,182 


.... 


Jaques . . 


Temple st. . . 


Bond st 


Public. 


45 


1,005 




Jasper pi. . . . 


Jasper st. . . . 


Walnut St. . .. . 


Private. 


20 




"225 


Jasper .... 


Pearl st. ... 


Oilman st. . . . 


Private. 


40 




300 


Jay 


Holland st. . . 


Howard st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


534 


.... 


Jerome ct. . . . 


Sycamore st. 


Jerome st. . . . 


Private. 


10 




150 


Jerome .... 


Montrose st. 


Jerome ct. . . . 


Private. 


20 




125. 


Joseph .... 


Newton st. . . 


Lincoln parkway . 


Public. 


40 


"458 


.... 


Josephine ave. 


Morrison ave. 


Broadway . . . 


Public. 


45 


1,718 


.... 


Joy 


Washington st. . 


Poplar St. ... 


Public. 


30 


1,121 





Joy St. pi. . . . 


Joy St. ... 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


30 




175 


Kenneson road . 


Broadway . . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


30 




270 


Kensington ave. . 


Broadway . . . 


Blakeley ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


455 




*Kensington ave. 


Blakeley ave. 


Middlesex ave. 


Private. 


40 


.... 


i.isa 


Kent ct. ... 


Kent St. . . . 


Northerly . . . 


Private. 


about 25 


.... 


420 


Kent 


Somerville ave. . 


Fitchburg R. R. . 


Public. 


40 


292 


.... 


Kent 


Fitchburg R. R. 


Beacon st. . . . 


Public. 


25 


386 





Kenwood . . . 


College ave. . . 


Billingham st. . . 


Public. 


40 


322 


.... 


Kidder ave. . . 


College ave. . . 


Liberty ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


625 


.. . 


Kidder ave. . . 


Liberty ave. . . 


Willow ave. . . 


Private. 


40 




665 


Kilby .... 


Somerville ave. . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


20 




180 


Kimball . . . 


Lowell St. . . 


Craigie st. . . . 


Private. 


40 





3oa 


Kingman road. . 


Washington st. . 


Fitchburg R. R. . 


Private. 


25 




400 


Kingston . . . 


Meacham road . 


Cambridge line . . 


Public. 


40 


647 





Knapp .... 


School St. . . . 


Granite st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


379 


.... 


Knowlton . . . 


Tufts St. . . . 


N 'Ely line Est. 37 


Public. 


40 


461 





Knowlton . . . 


End of above 


Oliver st. ... 


Private. 


40 




464 


Lake 


Hawkins st. . . 


Church St. . . . 


Public. 


40 


840 


.... 


Lamson ct. . . 


Linwood st. . . 


Poplar St. ... 


Private. 


20 


.... 


370 


Landers .... 


School St. . . 


Westerly .... 


Private. 


40 


.... 


280 


Latin Way . . . 


Talbot ave. . . 


Professors row . . 


Private. 


60 


.... 


25a 


Laurel ave. . . 


Laurel st. . . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


18 


... 


125 


Laurel .... 


Somerville ave. . 


Summer st. . 


Public. 


40 


983 


.... 


Lawrence . . . 


Hinckley st. . . 


B. & L. R. R. . . 


Private. 


35 


... 


650 


Lawrence . . . 


Boston ave. . . 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


35 




710 


Lawson ter. . . 


Putnam st. . . 


Easterly .... 


Private. 


5 




200 


Lee 


Medford st. . . 


Richdale ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


"385 




Leland .... 


Washington st. . 


Dane ave. . . . 


Private. 


40 





365 


Leon 


Concord ave. 


Dickinson st. . . 


Public. 


40 


155 


.... 


Leonard pi. . . 


Joy st 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


13+ 





9& 


Lesley ave. . . 


Highland ave. . 


Lexington ave. 


Public. 


40 


333 





Leslie pi. . . . 


Highland ave. . 


Northerly . . . 


Private. 


12 


.... 


75 


Lester ter. . . . 


Meacham road . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


20 





190 


Lexington ave. . 


Willow ave. 


Hancock st. . . . 


Public. 


50 


624 


.... 


Lexington ave. . 


Hancock st. . . 


Cedar st. ... 


Private. 


45 and 40 





721 


Liberty ave. . . 


Hall ave. . . . 


Broadway . . . 


PubUc. 


40 


1,395 


"ioo 


Liberty ave. . . 


Hall ave. . . . 


Appleton St. . . 


Private. 


40 




Lincoln ave. . . 


Lincoln st. . . 


Mt. Vernon st. 


Public. 


30 


"478 


— 


Lincoln parkway . 


Washington st. . 


Perry st. ... 


Public. 


40 


1,520 


— 


Lincoln pi. . . 


Lincoln ave. 


Northerly . . . 


Private. 


9 




120 


Lincoln .... 


Broadway. . . 


Perkins st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


550 


.... 


Linden ave. . . 


Elm St. ... 


Summer st. . . . 


Public. 


45 


1,083 


.... 


Linden ave. . . 


Summer st. . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


45 




250 


Linden circle . . 


Linden ave. . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


24 




120 


Linden pi. . . . 


Linden ave. . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


20 


.... 


160 

705 


Linden .... 


Somerville ave. . 


Charlestown st. 


Private. 


33 






♦Proposed. 



CITY ENGINEEK. 313 

Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 
Private Streets. — Continued. 













Length. 






To 


Public 


Width 






Street. 


From 


or 


in 












Private. 


Feet. 


Public. 


Private. 


Line 


Washington st. . 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


30 


1,727 




Linehan ct. . . 


Linwood st. . . 


Chestnut st. 


Private. 


about 15 




'266 


Linwood pi. 


Linwood st. . . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


about 12 




150 


Linwood . . . 


Somerville ave. . 


Washington st. 


Public. 


50 


2^114 




London . . . . 


Linwood st. . . 


B. & L. R. R. . . 


Private. 


40 




'346 


Loring .... 


Somerville ave. . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


40 


.... 


400 


Louisburg pi . . 


Autumn st. 


Easterly . . . . 


Private. 


13 




90 


Lovell .... 


Broadway . . 


Electric ave. . . 


Private. 


40 




385 


Lowden ave. . . 


Broadway . . 


Fosket St. ... 


Private. 


40 




1,205 


Lowell . . . . 


Somerville ave. . 


Summer st. . . . 


Public. 


3H 


1,259 




Lowell . . . . 


Summer st. . . 


Crown St. ... 


Private. 


33+ 




'349 


Lowell . . . . 


Crown St. . . 


Albion St. ... 


Public. 


40 


'972 




Lowell .... 


Albion St. . . 


L. & A.Br'ch R R. 


Private. 


40 




'546 


Lowell . . . . 


B. & L. R. R. . 


Vernon st. . . , 


Private. 


33+ 




60 


Lowell . . . . 


Vernon st. . . 


Medford st. . . 


Public. 


40 


1,14! 




Lowell ter. . . 


Lowell St. . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


20 




'150 


Madison . . . 


School St. . . . 


Sycamore st. . . 


Public. 


40 


891 


.... 


Main .... 


Broadway . . 


Medford line . . 


Public. 


50 


966 





♦Maiden . . . 


Mystic ave. . . 


Melrose st. . .' . 


Private. 


50 




1,360 


Mallet . . . . 


Willow ave. . . 


Liberty ave. . . 


Private. 


40 




580 


Malloy ct. . , . 


Somerville ave. 


Merriam ave. . 


Private. 


30 




256 


Malvern ave. . . 


Cameron ave. 


Yorktown st. . . 


Public. 


40 


410 




Manila road . . 


Beacon st. . . 


S-tcramento st. . . 


Private. 


41) 




'4O8 


Mansfield . . , 


Somerville ave. 


Washington st. 


Public. 


4't 


'735 




Maple ave. . . 


School St. . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


40 




'360 


Maple pi. . . . 


Marshall st. . . 


Maple ave. . . . 


Private. 


5 




125 


Maple .... 


Poplar St. . . 


Medford st. . . . 


Public. 


30 


'699 





Marion .... 


Concord ave. 


Wyatt St. N'w'ly . 


Public. 


40 


740 




Marshall . . . 


Broadway . . 


Pearl st 


Public. 


4f» 


1,650 




May pi 


Hawkins st. . . 


Easterly .... 


Private. 


12 





ii>6 


McCulphe pi. . 


Medford st. . . 


Easterly .... 


Private. 


10 





110 


McGregor ave. , 


Wigglesworth st. 


Walnut St. . . . 


Private. 


about 10 




250 


Meacham road 


Dover st. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


ijm 




Meacham . . . 


Mt. Vernon ave. 


Medford line . . 


Private. 


40 


.... 


koh 


Mead .... 


Cameron ave. 


Moore st. ... 


Private. 


40 




340 


MedfordJ . . . 


Cambridge line . 


Central st. . . . 


Public. 


50 


8',647 




Medford . . . 


Central st. . . 


Broadway . . , 


Public. 


55 


1,985 




Melledew ct. . . 


Belmont St. . . 


Easterly .... 


Private. 


15 




'137 


Melrose . . . 


Mystic ave. . . 


Fellsway . . . 


Private. 


50 




2,310 


Melvin .... 


Broadway . . 


Bonair st. ... 


Public. 


40 


'487 




Merriam ave. . . 


Merriam st. 


Malloy ct. ... 


Private. 


15 




255 


MerriaiTi . . . 


Somerville ave. 


Charlestown st. . 


Private. 


30 




500 


Middlesex ave. . 


Mystic ave. . 


Fellsway .... 


Public. 


60 


2',364 




Milk pi.: . . . 


Somerville ave. 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


about 30 




'ioo 


Miller .... 


Sacramento st. . 


Beacon st. . . . 


Private. 


33 




465 


Milton .... 


Orchard st. . . 


Cambridge line 


Public 


40 


'223 


.... 


Miner .... 


Vernon st. . . 


Ames St. ... 


Public. 


40 


244 


.... 


Mondamin ct. 


Ivaloo St. . . 


Harrison st. . . 


Private. 


25 





250 


Monmouth . . 


Central st. . . 


Westerly .... 


Public. 


40 


267 




Monmouth . . 


End of above 


Harvard st. . . . 


Private. 


35 





260 


Montgomery ave. 


Broadway . . . 


Wellington ave. . 


Public. 


40 


265 





Montrose ct. . . 


Montrose st. 


B. & L. R. R. . . 


Private. 


12 


... 


110 


Montrose . . . 


School St. . . 


Sycamore st. . . 


Public. 


40 


886 


.... 


Moore .... 


Holland st. . . 


Mead st 


Public. 


40 


695 


.... 


Moreland . . . 


Main st. . . . 


Meacham st. . . 


Public. 


40 


691 




Moreland . . . 


Meacham st. . . 


Mystic ave. . . . 


Private. 


40 




'822 


Morgan .... 


Beacon st. . . 


Park st 


Public. 


40 


*377 




Morrison ave. 


Cedar st. . . . 


Willow ave. . . . 


Public. 


50 


1,366 




Morrison ave. 


Willow ave. . . 


College ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


1,690 




Morrison pi. . . 


Morrison ave. . 


Northerly . . . 


Private. 


20 




'196 


Morrison pi. . . 


Morrison pi. . , 


Easterly .... 


Private. 


15 




175 


Mortimer pi. . 


Marshall st. . . 


Walter st. ... 


Private. 


20 




280 


Morton .... 


Glen St. ... 


Knowlton st. . . 


Public. 


40 


287 


.... 


Mossland . . . 


Somerville ave. . 


Elm st 


Public. 


40 


377 




Mountain ave. 


Linden ave. , 


Porter st. ... 


Private. 


22 




'316 


Mousal pi. . . . 


North Union st. 


B. & M. R. R. . 


Private. 


20 




200 



•Proposed. 



314 



ANNUAL KEPORTS. 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Priv ate Streets. — Continued. 















Length. 


Street. 


From 


To 


Public 


Width 






or 


in 












Private. 


Feet. 


Public. 


Private. 


Mt. Pleasant ct 


Perkins st. . . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


40 ■ 




260 


Mt. Pleasant . . 


Broadway . . . 


Perkins st. . . . 


Public. 


33 


'584 




Mt. Vernon ave. . 


Main st. . . . 


Meacham st. . . 


Private. 


50 




'm 


Mt. Vernon . . 


Washington st. . 


Pearl st 


Public. 


40 


'eoo 




Mt. Vernon . . 


Pearl st. . . . 


Perkins st. . . . 


Public. 


50 


473 


.... 


Mt. Vernon . . 


Perkins st. . . 


Broadway . . . 


Public. 


40 


590 


.... 


Munroe .... 


Walnut St. . . 


Easterly .... 


Public. 


40 


375 




Munroe .... 


End of above 


Boston St. . . . 


Public. 


50 


1,214 




Murdock 


Cedar st. . . . 


Clyde St. ... 


Private. 


30 




'966 


Murray .... 


Washington st. . 


Southerly 


Private. 


30 




250 


Museum . . . 


Beacon st. . . 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


'164 




Myrtle ct. . . . 


Myrtle St. . . . 


Easterly .... 


Private. 


10 




"ioo 


Myrtle pi. . • . 


Myrtle st. . . 


Westerly .... 


Private. 


20+ 




120 


Myrtle .... 


Washington st. . 


Perkins st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


l',423 


.... 


Mystic ave. . . 


Charlestown line 


Union St. ... 


Public. 


60 


378 




Mystic ave. . . 


Union st. . . . 


Medford line . . 


Public. 


66 


6,938 




Mystic .... 


Washington st. . 


Somerville ave. 


Public. 


40 


360 




Mystic .... 


Benedict st. . . 


Mystic ave. . . 


Private. 


40 





"336 


Nashua .... 


Richardson st. . 


B. & L. R. R. . . 


Public. 


35 


637 


.... 


Nevada ave. . . 


Village St. . . 


Hanson st. . . . 


Private. 


20 




200 


Newberne . 


Appleton St. . . 


Morrison ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


'200 




Newberne . . . 


Morrison ave. . 


Arlington Br. R.R. 


Private. 


40 




i73 


Newbury 


Holland st. . . 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


1^260 





Newman pi. . . 


Cedar st. . . . 


Southeasterly . 


Private. 


15 




100 


Newton pi. . . 


Newton st. . . 


Easterly .... 


Private. 


about 10 




100 


Newton .... 


Prospect St. . . 


Webster ave. . . 


Public. 


25 


'476 




Newton .... 


Webster ave. 


Concord ave. 


Public. 


40-f 


637 




Norfolk .... 


Webster ave. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


283 




North .... 


Broadway . . . 


Medford' line b, 17 


Public. 


40 


1,961 




North .... 


Medfordlineb.17 


Medford line b. 18 


Public. 


37 to 42 


649 




North Unioa . . 


Mystic ave. . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


30 




eob 


Norton .... 


Nashua st. . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


20 




200 


Norwood ave. 


Broadway . . . 


Medford st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


'356 


— 


Oak 


Prospect St. . . 


Angle 


Public. 


40 


665 


— 


Oak 


Angle .... 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


30 


563 


"85 


Oak St. pi. . . . 


Oak St. ... 


Northerly . . . 


Private. 


4 




Oakland ave. . . 


Marshall st. . . 


School St. ... 


Public. 


40 


440 




Olive ave. . . . 


Linden ave. . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


25 




155 


Olive sq. ... 


Lake st. . . . 


Southerly . . . 


Private. 


about 15 




100 


Oliver .... 


Franklin st. . . 


Cross St. -. . . 


Public. 


40 


1,085 


.... 


Orchard .... 


Cambridge line . 


Meacham road . . 


Public. 


40 


1,567 


'450 


Osgood .... 


Granite st. . . 


Easterly & west'ly 


Private. 


40 




Ossipee road . , 


Packard ave. 


Curtis St. ... 


Public. 


40 


682 




Otis 


Cross St. . . . 


Wiggles worth st. . 


Public. 


40 


1,200 




Oxford .... 


School St. . . . 


Central st. . . . 


Public. 


35 


1,361 


... 


Oxford .... 


Beacon st. . . 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


50 


100 


.... 


Packard ave. . . 


Broadway . . . 


Professors row . 


Public. 


60 


1,758 


.... 


Packard ave. . . 


Professors row . 


Medford line . . 


Private. 


60 


.... 


242 


Palmer ave. . . 


Franklin st. . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


20 





200 


Park ave. . . . 


sCollege ave. . . 


Wallace st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


467 




Park pi. ... 


Laurel st. . . 


Easterly . . . . 


Private. 


30 




220 


Park pi. ... 


Park pi. . . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


20 




150 


Park 


Somerville ave. 


Beacon st. . . . 


Public. 


50 


1,238 


.... 


Parker pi. . . . 


Porter st. . . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


20 




150 


Parker .... 


Washington st. . 


Fremont ave. . . 


Private. 


35 




200 


Partridge ave. 


Vernon st. . . 


Broadway . . . 


Public. 


40 


1,467 





Patten ct. . . . 


Cutter St. . . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


8 


.... 


100 


Paulina .... 


Broadway . 


Holland st. . . . 


Private. 


40 




775 


Pearl 


Crescent st. . . 


Mt Vernon st. 


Public. 


37 


341 





Pearl 


Mt. Vernon st. . 


Franklin st. . . 


Public. 


50 


957 


.... 


Pearl 


Franklin st. . . 


Cross St. . . . 


Public. 


40 


1,060 


.... 


Pearl 


Cross St. . . . 


Medford st. . . 


Public. 


50 


2,447 





Pearl St. pi. . . 


Pearl st. . . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


20 




200 


Pearl ter. . . . 


Pearl st. . . . 


Northerly . . . 


Private. 


23 




161 



CITY ENGINEER. 



315 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets. — Continued. 













Length. 


Strkbt. 


From 


To 


Public 


Width 






or 


in 












Private. 


Feet. 


Public. 


Private. 


Pearson ave. . . 


Morrison ave. . 


Boston ave. . . 


Private. 


45 




l,30o 


Pearson road . . 


Broadway . . . 


Dearborn road 


Private. 


40 




1,654 


Pembroke ct. 


Pembroke St. 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


25 




130 


Pembroke . . . 


Central st. . . 


Sycamore st. 


Public. 


40 


'436 




Perkins pi. . . . 


Perkins st. . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


20 




'266 


Perkins .... 


Franklin st. . 


Charlestown line . 


Public. 


40 


l',336 




Perry .... 


Washington st. . 


Lincoln parkway . 


Public. 


40 


606 




Peterson ter. . . 


Porter st. . . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


13+ 


• • • ■ 


'155 


Pinckney pi. . . 


Pinckney st. . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


24 




126 


Pinckney . . . 


Washington st. . 


Perkins st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


I'ise 




Pitman .... 


Beech st. . . . 


. Spring St. ... 


Private. 


30 




"380 


Pitman .... 


Spring St. . . . 


Belmont st. . . . 


Private. 


26 




390 


Pleasant ave. 


Walnut St. 


Vinal ave. 


Public. 


40 


'543 




Poplar ct. . . . 


Poplar St. . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


10 




'so 


Poplar .... 


Somerville ave. 


Linwood st. . . 


Public. 


30 


351 




Poplar .... 


Linwood st. . . 


Joy st 


Public. 


35 


315 




Poplar . . - . . 


Joy st 


B. & L. R. R. 


Private. 


35 




"65 


Porter ave. . . 


Porter st. . . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


20 




220 


Porter pi. . . . 


Porter st. . . . 


Northwesterly . 


Private. 


20 




196 


Porter .... 


Elm St. ... 


Mountain ave. 


Public. 


45 


l',622 


.... 


Porter . / . . 


Mountain ave. . 


Highland ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


415 


.... 


Powder house 


Powder house 


Northwesterly, 










boulevard . . 


square . . . 


Mystic river and 














Medford line 


Public. 


80 


7,200 




Powder house ter. 


Kidder ave. . . 


Liberty ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


585 




Prescott . . . 


Summer st. . . 


Highland ave. . . 


Public. 


50 


1,110 


.... 


Preston road . . 


School St. . . 


Summer st. . . . 


Public. 


49 


839 




Princeton . . . 


Alpine st. . . 


Lowell St. . . . 


Public. 


40 


648 




Princeton . . . 


Lowell St. . . 


Centre st. ... 


Private. 


40 


.... 


'546 


Pritcbard ave. 


Morrison ave. . 


Frederick ave. . . 


Public 


40 


634 




Pritchard ave. 


Frederick ave. . 


Boston ave. . . . 


1 Private. 


40 




'511 


Professors row . 


College ave. . . 


Curtis St. ... 


Public. 


40 


2',666 


.... 


Prospect . . . 


Washington st. . 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


50 


2,071 




Prospect Hillav. 


Medford st. . . 


Munroe st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


597 




Prospect Hill p'k'y 


Munroe st. . . 


Stone ave. . . . 


PubHc. 


40 


400 




Prospect pi. . . 


Prospect St. . . 


Newton st. . . . 


Private. 


20 


.... 


'{36 


Putnam .... 


Summer st. . 


Highland ave. 


Public. 


50 


1,262 




Quincy .... 


Somerville ave. 


Summer st. . . 


Public. 


40 


781 


.... 


Randolph pi. . . 


Cross St. . . . 


Westerly .... 


Private. 


15 




244 


Raymond ave. 


Curtis St. . . . 


North St. ... 


Public. 


40 


1,345 




Record's pi. . . 


Broadway . . . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


10 




"lib 


Reed's ct. . . . 


Oliver st. . . . 


Southwesterly . . 


Private. 


20 




105 


Remick ct. . . 


Cutter St. . . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


10 




100 


Richardson . . 


Lowell St. . . 


Lawrence st. . . 


Public. 


35 


"467 




Richardson ter. . 


Richardson st. . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


20 




'135 


Richdale ave. 


School St. . . 


Sycamore st. 


Public. 


40 


'875 




Richmond hi'h'ds 


Madison st. . . 


Southerly . . . 


Private. 


30 




'156 


Roberts .... 


Lawrence st. 


Northwesterly . 


Private. 


20 




170 


Robinson . . . 


Central st. . . 


Bartlett st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


'582 




Rogers ave. . . 


Morrison ave. ' . 


Boston ave. . . . 


Public 


45 


1,682 




Roland st. . . . 


Waverly st. . . 


Boston line . . . 


Private. 


40 




*i66 


Roseland . . . 


Beacon st. . . 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


'121 




Rossmore . . . 


Somerville ave. 


Washington st. 


Public. 


40 


534 




Royce pi. . . . 


Bonair st. . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


15+ 




'175 


Rush 


Broadway . . . 


Flint st 


Public. 


40 


1,466 


.... 


Russell road . . 


Broadway . . . 


North st 


Private. 


40 




1,193 


Russell .... 


Elm St. ... 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


'766 


.... 


Sacramento . . 


Somerville ave. 


Fitchburg R. R. . 


Public. 


40 


80 




Sacramento . , 


Fitchburg R. R. 


Beacon st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


290 


.... 


Sacramento . . 


Beacon st. . . 


Cambridge line 


Private. 


40 


.... 


156 


Sanborn ave. . . 


Warren ave. 


Walnut St. . . . 


Public. 


40 . 


280 




Sanborn ct. . . 


Washington st. 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


30 




'176 


Sargent ave. . . 


Broadway . . . 


Walnut St. . . . 


Public. 


40 


1,075 


. . . . 


Sartwell ave. . . 


Cedar st. . . . 


Cherry st. . . . 


Private. 


35 




400 



316 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 

Private Streets.— Continued. 



Street. 



From 



To 



Public 

or 
Private. 



Sawyer ave 
School . 
School . 
Sellon pi. 
Seven Pines 
Sewall ct 
Sewall . 
Shawmut pi 
Shawmut 
Shedd . 
Sherman ct 
Sherman 
Sibley ct. 
Sibley pi. 
Simpson ave 
Skehan . 
vSkehan . 
Skilton ave 
Smith ave. 
Snow pi. 
Snow pi. 
Snow ter. 
Somerville ave 
Somerville ave 
South . . 
Spencer ave. 
Spring ct. . 
Spring , . 
Springfield 
Spring Hill te 
Stanford ter. 
Stickney ave. 
St. James ave 
St. James ave 
Stone ave 
Stone ave 
Stone pi. 
Summer 
Summit ave 
Summit . 
Sumner . 
Sunnyside ave 
Sycamore . 
Sycamore . 
Sycamore . 
Sydney . . 

Talbot ave. 
♦Tannery (Ext 
Taunton. 
Taunton 
Tiylor pi. 
Taylor . 
Teele ave. 
Temple . 
Tenney ct. 
Tennyson 
Thorndike 
Thorndike 
Thorpe pi. 
Thurston 
Tower ct. 
Tower . 
Tremont pi 



ext 



Packard ave. 
Somerville ave 
Highland ave 
Marshall st. 
Cameron ave 
Sewall St. . 
Grant st. . 
Shawmut st. 
Washington st. 
Somerville ave 
Sargent ave. . 
Somerville ave 
Cutter St. . 
Cutter St. . 
Broadway . 
Dane st. . 
Hanson 
Pearl st. . 
Beacon st. 
Belmont st 
Snow pi. . 
Jaques st. 
E. Camb. line 
Union sq. 
Medford st. 
Cedar st. . 
Somerville ave 
Somerville ave 
Concord ave. 
Highland ave. 
Beacon st. 
Marshall st 
Elm St. 
Summer st. 
Union sq. . 
Columbus ave 
Stone ave. 
Bow St. 
Walnut St. 
College ave. 
Lawrence st 
Walnut St. 
Broadway 
Medford st. 
B. & L. R. R. 
Grant st. . . 

Packard ave. 
Cambridge line 
Wyatt St. 
Angle . . . 
Somerville ave 
Mystic ave. . 
Packard ave. 
Broadway 
Mystic ave. . 
Forster st. . 
Holland st. . 
Arl'gt'nHr. R.R 
Highland ave 
Broadway 
Tyler st. . 
Crown St. 
Tremont st. , 



th'ly 



Curtis St. 
Highland ave. 
Broadway 
Northwesterly 
Cambridge lin 
Southwesterly 
Temple st. . 
Alston St. . 
Cross St. 
Merriam ave. 
Marshall st. 
Frost ave. 
Northwesterly 
Northwesterly 
Holland st. . 
Hanson st. . 
Durham . . 
Pearl st. . . 
Line st. . 
Easterly . . 
N'th'lyandS' 
Southwesterly 
Union sq. 
N. Camb. line 
Water st. 
Hancock st. 
Westerly . . 
Summer st. . 
Cambridge line 
Belmont st. 
Northeasterly 
School St. 
Summer st. . 
Northeasterly 
Columbus ave. 
Prospect Hill p 
Southeasterly 
Elm St. . . 
Vinal ave. 
Billingham st. 
Northwesterly 
Wigglesworth st 
Medford st. 
B. & L. R R. 
Highland ave. 
Temple st. . 



College ave. . 
Woodstock St. (Ext' 
Easterly to angle 
Marion st. . 
Southerly 
Sydney st. . 
Curtis St. 
Mystic ave. . 
Northeasterly 
Pembroke st. 
Arl'ngt'n Br. R 
Kingston st. 
Southwesterly 
Rich dale ave. 
Northeasterly 
Highland ave. 
Southeasterly 



k' 



Width 

in 
Feet. 



Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 



40 

40 

F>0 

12 

40 

25 

40 

30 

40 

40 

10 

35 

10 

10 

40 

30 

30 

40 

25+ 

30 

20 

16 

75 

70 

30 

40 

20 

40 

40 . 

20 

20 

40 

40 

30 

40 

38 

30 

45 

45 

40 

20 

35 

45 

40 

35 

40 

50 
40 
30 
20 
15 
40 
40 
66 
30 
40 
40 
46 
30 
40 
25 
40 
about 10 



Length. 



1,901 

2,500 

'"92 
615 
575 



306 



4,325 

6,793 

989 

727 

1.220 

788 



458 
488 

676 
107 

7*900 
532 
262 



1,275 
667 
722 
679 



Public. Private. 



690 

126 
190 
'260 

aio 

250 
270 
100 
100 
825 

414 
540 
200 
75 
222 
120 



200 



670 
200 



125 
146 



176 

250 





1,409 




160 


.... 


170 


. . . • 


96 


• . • • 


20) 


.... 


3ie 




685 


1,637 




.... 


400 


922 




465 




115 




468 




1,66'» 






160 


559 


• • > • 




76 



•Proposed. 



CITY ENGINEER. 



317 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public and 
Private Streets. — Continued. 



Street. 



From 



To 



Public 

or 
Private. 



Width 

in 
Feet. 



Length. 



Public. Private 



Tremont . . 
Trull . . . 
Trull lane . . 
Tufts parkway 
Tufts , , . 
Tyler . . . 

Unnamed st. . . 

Unnamed st. 
(Highway and 
Water Dept 
grounds) . 

Union . , 

Union pi. . 

Upland Park 



Veazie . 
Veazie . 
Vernon . 
Vernon . 
Vernon . 
Victoria 
Villa ave. 
Village . 
Vinal ave. 
Vinal . . 
Vine ct. , 
Vine . . 
Vine . . 
Virginia . 

Wade ct. 
Waldo ave. 
Waldo . 
Wallace . 
Walnut . 
Walter pi. 

Walter . 

Ward . 
Ware . . 
Warner . 
Warren ave 
Warren . 
Warwick place 
Warwick 
Washington ave 
Washington 
Washington 
Washington 
Water . . 
Waterhouse 
Watson . . 
Waverly 
Webster ave. 
Webster 
Wellington ave. 
Wellington ave. 
Wesley pk. 
Wesley . . 
West . . . 
West . . . 
Westminster 
Weston ave. 
Westwood road 



Webster ave. 
Vernon st. 
Highland ave. 
College ave. . 
Washington st. 
Vine St. 

Ware st. . . 



Broadway . . 
Broadway 

Linwood st. . 

Main st. . . 

Walnut St. 
Bradley st. 
Central st. 
Glenwood road 
Partridge ave. 
Broadway 
Winslow ave. 
Dane st. . . 
Summer st. . 
Richardson st. 
Vine St. . . 
Somerville ave 
Hanson st. . 
Aldrich st. 

Cedar st. . . 
Beacon si. 
Highland ave. 
Holland st. . 
Bow St. 
Walter st. 

Walnut St. . 

Medford st. . 
Curtis St. . . 
Powder House sq 
Union sq. 
Medford st. . 
Warwick st. . 
Cedar st. . . 
Washington st. 
Charlest'n line 
Franklin ave 



Fitchburg R 
South St. . 
Broadway 
Broadway 
Washington st. 
Union sq. 
Franklin st. 
Walnut St. 
Montgomery 
Wesley sq. 
Pearl st. . 
Broadway . 
Hawthorne st 
Broadway . 
Clarendon ave 
Central st. 



R 



Cambridge line 
Medford st. 
Oxford St. 
College ave. 
Cross St. . . 
Dane st. . . 



Powder h'se blvd. 



Cedar st. . . 
Mystic ave. 
Southwesterly 
Southwesterly 

Bradley st. . 
Marshall st. 
Glenwood road 
Partridge ave 
Lowell St. 
Cambridge line 
Arlington Br. R 
Vine St. . 
Highland ave. 
Northeasterly 
Northwesterly 
Hanson st. . 
Beacon st. 
Jasper st. 



Westerly . 
Dimick st. . 
Hudson St. . 
Broadway 
Broadway 
Southwesterly 
I about 100 ft. N. 
I of Bradley st. 
Earle st. . . . 
Powder h'se blvd. 
Medford line . 
Columbus ave. 
Cambridge line 
Northeasterly , 
Warwick pi. 
Northerly 
Franklin ave. . 
Fitchburg R. R. 
Cambridge line 
Northerly . . 
Cambridge line 
Fairmount ave. 
Roland st. . - . 
Cambridge line 
Cross St. . . . 
Montgomery ave 
Easterly . . . 
Northeasterly . 
Otis St. . . . 
Heath st. . . 
Arlington Br. R. R 
Electric ave. 
Broadway 
Benton road 



Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 



Private. 
Public. 
Private. 
Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 



40 


589 


40 


1,050 


15 




22 


900 


40 


982 


40 


404 


20-40 




45 




40 


345 


10 




20 




35 


392 


40 


261 


40 


764 


40 to 30 


190 


30 


434 


40 




35 




25 




45 


1,425 


20 




25 




40 




25 




40 


405 


20 




40 




40 


287 


40 


1,342 


40 


3,948 


40 




40 


548 


30 




40 


■ • . • 


60 


500 


40 


663 


30 to 40 


109 


15 




40 


665 


18 




75 


1,060 


60 to 100 


3,977 


60 


2,344 


25 




40 




40 ' 




35 




49.5 


1,955 


40 


1 034 


40 


215 


40 




40 


405 


40 


515 


30 




30 




40 


376 


40 


.... 


40 


489 



200 



283 



980 

ioo 

175 



1,(136 
200 
370 

'200 
140 
780 
650 



180 
277 



222 



610 

700 



150 
350 



250 
986 
236 

200 



85 



250 
460 

526 



318 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



Table Showing the Location, Length and Width of Public ani 
Private Streets. — Concluded. 









Public 


Width 


Length. 


Stkeet, 


From. 


To 


or 


m 












Private 


Feet. 


Public. 


Private. 


"Wheatland . . . 


Broadway . 


Mystic ave. . . . 


Public. 


40 


1,364 




Wheeler . . . 


Pinckney st. . . 


Mt. Vernon st. 


Public. 


40 


269 


.... 


Whipple . . . 


Highland ave. . 


Arlington Br. R. R. 


Private. 


30 




318 


tWhite .... 


Elm St. ... 


Cambridge line 


Public. 




307 


. . . • 


White St. pi. . . 


White St. . . . 


Southeasterly . . 


Private. 


20 


• • • • 


200 


Whitfield road. . 


Packard ave. 


Curtis St. ... 


Private. 


40 




684 


Wigglesworth . 


Bonair st. . . . 


Pearl st 


Public. 


40 


744 


.... 


William. . . . 


Chandler st. . . 


College ave. . . 


Public. 


40 


381 


. . . • 


WiUiam .... 


Broadway . . . 


Medford line . . 


Private. 


50 


.... 


45 


Williams ct. . . 


Porter st. . . . 


Northwesterly . . 


Private. 


30 




150 


Willoughby . . 


Central st. . . 


Sycamore st. . . 


Public. 


40 


427 


.... 


Willow ave. . . 


Elm St. ... 


Broadway . . . 


Pubhc. 


50 


3,534 


.... 


Willow pi. . . . 


Cambridge line . 


South st 


Private. 


25 


.... 


150 


Wilson ave. 


Broadway . 


B. & L. R. R. . . 


Private. 


20 




310 


Wilton .... 


Lowell St. . . . 


Lawrence st. . . 


Public. 


35 


470 


.... 


Winchester . . 


Broadway . . . 


Medford line . . 


Private. 


40 


.... 


65 


Windom . . . 


Elm St. ... 


Summer st. . . . 


Public. 


40 


300 




Windsor road . . 


Willow ave. . . 


Hancock st. . . 


Public. 


40 


575 


.... 


Winslow ave. , . 


College ave. . . 


Clifton St. ... 


Public. 


40 


1,123 




Winter .... 


College ave. . 


Holland st. . . . 


Public. 


30 


402 


.... 


Winter Hill cir. . 


Broadway . . . 


Northeasterly . . 


Private. 


25 


.... 


177 


Winthrop ave. 














(Extension.) 


Mystic ave. . . 


Middlesex ave. 


Private. 


40 




583 


Woodbine . . . 


Centre st. . , 


Lowell St. ... 


Private. 


30 


.... 


600 


* Woods ave. . . 


North St. . . , 


Alewife brook , . 


Private. 


40 


.... 


1,350 


Woodstock . . . 


Victoria st. . . 


Alewife brook . . 


Private. 


40 




415 


*Woodstock 














(Extension.) 


Victoria st. . . 


Tannery St. (Ext'n.^ 


Private. 


40 


.... 


920 


Wyatt circle . . 


Wyatt St. . . 


Wyatt St. ... 


Private. 


20 




315 


Wyatt .... 


Concord ave. 


Lincoln parkway . 


Public. 


40 


496 





Yorktpwn . . . 
Yorktown , . . 


Cambridge line . 
( N. E. line i 
1 Malvern ave. ; 


1 N. E. line Mai- ) 
1 vem ave. j 
Northerly . , . 


Public. 
Private. 


40 
40 


294 


100 



*Proposed. 

tSidewalk in Somerville. 



Court . 








26 Craigie st. 


Westerly 






Private. 


25 






126 


Court . 








36 Craigie st. 


Westerly 






Private. 


25 






126 


Court . 








292 Broadway . 


Southwesterly 






Private. 


15 






96 


Court . 








58 Dane st. . . 


Easterly . . 






Private. 


10 






70 


Court . 








66 Lowell St. 


Westerlv 






Private. 


25 






101 


Court . 








78 Lowell St. . 


Westerlv 






Private. 


25 






101 


Court . 








Olive ave. . . 


Porter st. 






Private. 


7.5 






156 


Court . 








10 Stone ave. 


Northwesterly 






Private. 


20 






113 


Court . 








21 Albion st . . 


Northeasterly 






Private. 


10 






100 


Court . . 








227 Columbia st. 


Northw ester! V 






Private. 


10 






117 


Court . 








11 Albion St. 


Northeasterly 






Private. 


9 






170 


Court . 








20 Dimick st. . 


Southwesterly 






Private. 


39.25 






136 


Court 








612 Broadway 


Southwesterly 






Private. 


20 






188 


Total 












370,779 


124,063 















Public, 70.223 miles ( includes 2.843 miles boulevards ) ; private, 23 


497 miles. 


Total le 


ng 


th 


3f 


streets in the city, 1 


)3. 720 miles. 


















WILLOW AVENUE. 
Granolithic Laid by Highways Department. 



REPORT OF THE STREET COMMISSIONER. 



Office of the Stkeet Commissionee, I 
City Hall, January 1, 1906. ] 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen: — 

Gentlemen, — I most respectfully submit the thirtieth an- 
nual report, containing a brief summary of the principal work- 
performed by the highway department during the year 1905, 
with recommendations for necessary improvements and addi- 
tions for the coming year. 

The highway department has made great progress toward 
the improvement of the main streets the past year. 

Pearl and Medford Streets. 

Pearl street, from Cross street to Medford street, including 
Gilman square, and Medford street, from Oilman square to 
School street, have been put in a first-class condition with 
bitulithic paving at a cost of $18,558.54. 

Edgestones were reset where needed, and flagging cross- 
ings laid at street intersections. 

The street railway company raised and repaired its tracks, 
and all the mains and connections of the telephone, water, gas, 
and sewer pipes were repaired before the bitulithic paving was 
laid. 

The firm of Warren Brothers Corporation received the 
contract to lay the bitulithic for $2.25 per square yard with a 
five-year guarantee. I recommend that this kind of paving be 
extended on Medford street to Magoun square. 

Highland Avenue. 

The department, with its own labor and the co-operation 
of the Boston Elevated Railway Company, paved the portion of 
Highland avenue extending from Davis square easterly about 
100 feet, with paving brick, the joints being grouted with Port- 
land cement on a concrete base, at a cost of $1,261.52. This 
paving should be extended on Highland avenue to Grove street. 

Holland and Washington Streets, 

Holland street, the entire length, and Washington street 
from Union square to the Cambridge line have been macadam- 
ized, trap rock being used for the two top layers on Washington 
street, at a total cost for both streets of $9,364.11. 



320 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Granite Paving. 

Somerville avenue, in front of Squire's box factory, and 
Warren street, which is used a great deal for heavy teaming, 
were paved with granite paving blocks at a cost of $1,396.72. 

The city should continue to pave portions of the main 
streets with some kind of permanent paving each year. By so 
doing, not only may the main streets be put in first-class condi- 
tion, but all the side streets in the vicinity may be repaired with 
the old material excavated for the new paving. 

Clarendon Avenue. 

An order was passed by the board of aldermen January 25, 
1903, for the laying out and acceptance of Clarendon avenue, 
from Broadway to the Cambridge line. 

Work was begun at once and was cgmpleted May 1, 1905, 
at a cost of $1?, 260. 98. Althovigh the cost was great, the high- 
way department received a large amount of stone, which was 
crushed and used on the streets. The laying out of this street 
lias placed on the market a large tract of improved land for 
building purposes from which the city will receive an increase 
in taxes. It also furnished work for unemployed citizens in the 
winter time, when most of the work was done. 

City Ledge. 

The city ledge between Broadway and Holland street 
would have been nearly exhausted at the end of this year had 
not the city constructed Clarendon avenue, thereby receiving 
enough stone for street work without drawing very heavily on 
the city ledge. I agree with Mayor Chandler when he says in 
his inaugural address of 1905 that with the complete removal 
of the city ledge, opportunity would be given for a great im- 
provement. A sixty-foot street could be laid out through this 
property to connect with Cameron and Packard avenues, thus 
afifording a fine thoroughfare between North Cambridge and 
Tufts College. I would recommend, as last year, the early con- 
sideration of the advisability of purchasing a stone ledge of 
suitable material, if found in a favorable location. I think great 
improvement at a less cost can be made in the construction and 
maintenance of our streets if such a purchase is made. 

Stone Crusher. 

The crushing plant has worked 287 days the past year, 
but was unable to supply the demand for stone. The plant was 
thoroughly overhauled, and the installment of a new screen has 
added greatly to the improvement of the plant, and it is my in- 
tention to add to the bin capacity, thereby saving handling the 
crushed stone. Fourteen thousand six hundred fifty tons were 
crushed, and 1,693 tons purchased during the year. 




CLARENDON AVENUE. — Before Construction. 




CLARENDON AVENUE.— After Construction. 



STPtEET COMMISSIONER. 321 

Street Cleaning. 

All the streets, both accepted and private, were cleaned 
during the year, and all the paved streets* swept as often as the 
highway appropriation would allow. $12,(}18.0G was spent iii 
this branch of the work. 

Patrolmen with push carts have been constantly kept at 
the squares and on the main streets, and I hope the appropria- 
tion will allow this force to be increased the coming year, and 
also be sufficient for the purchase of a gutter sweeper. The 
placing of one or more waste barrels at all the schoolhouses for 
the pupils, and on the main streets for the public, would not 
only save the city expense, but would improve the looks of the 
streets in the vicinity, and it is my intention to carry out this 
idea. The teaming in this branch of the work the coming year 
will be increased, as the dumping places are few and far between. 

Bridges. 

The bridges are in good condition. By the decision of the 
county commissioners two bridges are to be built over the 
tracks at Lowell street. One will be paid for by the Boston & 
Maine Railroad Corporation, while the decision as to the pay- 
ment for the other is yet to be determined by the court. The 
construction of the bridges will develop the unimproved land in 
the vicinity of Albion and adjacent streets, and will be a great 
benefit to the general public. Plans are being drawn by the city 
engineer for the abolishing of grade crossings on the Fitchburg 
division of the Boston & Maine railroad. 

Shade Trees. 

There is nothing which helps to improve the looks of a city 
more than shade trees. Trees have been set out on Highland 
avenue and Holland street the entire length at the expense of 
the city, and in cases where individuals paid for the trees, the 
department set them out, protecting them with a wire guard 
and pole, and watering them during the dry season. I recom- 
mend that the city purchase and set out shade trees on Summer 
street. The department has set out 675 trees, while forty-six 
dead and dangerous trees were removed during the year. 

Subways. 

The subways at Kent, Sacramento, and Thorndike streets 
are in good condition. Men are assigned to care^for the same, 
and extra help is provided in case of a storm. If subways were 
built at West street and Hancock street, on the Arlington 
Branch of the Boston & Maine Railroad, it would be a great 
convenience and safety to the public until such time as grade 
crossings are abolished. 



32^ Annual reports. 

The Brown=tail and Qypsy Moth. 

The orig-inal home of the brown-tail moth was in Europe, 
where the insect is found all over the entire continent except in 
the northern portions. It first came here in the year 1890 and 
the first serious outbreak occurred in 1807. All of the streets are 
now generally infested throughout the entire city. 

The Qypsy Moth. 

This moth first made its appearance in Medford in the year 
1868, escaping from an eminent astronomer and naturalist who 
was experimenting with the rearing of silk worms. The dis- 
trict in Somerville mostly infested is in the vicinity of College 
avenue, and all streets north and west, and while there are a few 
other colonies, yet the city is not generally infested. The 
streets west of College avenue, however, will have to be bur- 
laped and a good many sprayed, during the coming spring. 

The destruction of the moths is now required by law, as set 
forth in chapter 381, of the acts of the legislature of 1905, 
which reads to the efifect that these pests are nuisances, and 
calls for a state appropriation of $300,000 and a state superin- 
tendent to see that the cities and towns carry out the provisions 
of this act. Until the appointment of an inspector of trees, late 
in the year, to have charge of this work in accordance with the 
requirements of this act, the work has been continued by thfs 
department. Hereafter when the city spends $5,000 in any one 
year, the said city is reimbursed 50 per cent, of all they spend 
over this amount during the year. The total amount expended 
to date is $18,488.06. 

Street Watering. 

Under the law providing for the assessment for street 
watering only accepted streets can be watered. When residents 
w^ish private streets watered they must pay the cost of such 
watering in advance. The street watering is let out by contract 
at $85 per month per cart, the contractor to furnish a com- 
petent driver with a good pair of horses, and to see that his 
route, which comprises about two miles, is properly watered at 
all times, including Sundays and holidays. There are thirty- 
two watering carts, all painted and repaired by the department. 
So many new streets are being added to the street watering list 
that I w^ould recommend the purchase of a new cart the coming 
season. $21,623.92 was spent the last year in this branch of the 
highway department. 

Granolithic Sidewalks. 

The department for the first time with its own labor laid a 
granolithic sidewalk on Willow avenue at a cost of $1.36 a 



STREET COMMISSIOXER. 323 

square yard, whereas the contractor's price for six months was 
$1.44 a square yard. I recommend that the department do this 
kind of work with its own labor in the future. 

5team Rollers. 

The city has three Buffalo Pitts steam rollers, one fifteen- 
ton, which has worked during the year 200 days, one twelve- 
ton, worked 201 days, and one five-ton asphalt roller, which has 
been used in cases of emergency. A new set of wheels has been 
purchased during the past year for the twelve-ton roller. All 
three are now in fair condition. 

There is such a pressing demand to have streets re-surfaced 
and macadamized, and so much good material for re-surfacing 
streets with a steep grade coming from trenches made for the 
water, gas, and underground wire, pipe, and conduits, and ex- 
cavations for new paving, that I would recommend the purchase 
of another fifteen-ton roller. 

Snow and Ice. ♦ 

This department was very fortunate in not having to care 
for a large amount of snow, as no appropriation is made for the 
same, and the difference between $7,884.26 spent this year against 
$13,171.62 spent last year was used to good advantage on the 
maintenance of our streets. Two thousand three hundred 
twelve loads of snow and ice were removed from the streets dur- 
ing the year. It is also the duty of this department to care for 
the removal of snow from all sidewalks in front of public build- 
ings and public grounds, and to guard against their being in a 
slippery condition. Ordinance No. 46, approved February 12, 
1904, sections 1 and 2 of which are quoted below, quite clearly 
regulates the removal of snow and ice on sidewalks. 

Section 1. No owner or tenant of land abutting upon a sidewalk 
within the limits of any highway or townway in this city shall sufTer to 
remain on such sidewalk for more than six hours between sunrise and 
sunset, on any day, any snow nor an}^ ice, unless such ice is made even 
and covered with sand or other suitable material to prevent slipping. 
Such owner and tenant shall remove all snow and ice from such sidewalk 
within the time and in the manner herein specified. 

Section 2. Whoever violates any of the provisions of section 1 of 
this ordinance shall forfeit to the city the sum of v$25 for each offense. 

Boxes filled with fine sand for slippery going on the smooth 
paved streets, squares, and at subways have been placed within 
easy access for the push-cart men. 

Wires Underground. 

Permits for opening the streets were issued to the New 
England Telephone and Telegraph Company for burying wires 
on Benton road from Highland avenue to Hudson street, and 



324 Al^NtJAL REPOl^TS. 

on Broadway, south side, from Mt. Vernon street to Boston 
avenue, and to the , Edison Electric lUuminating' Company of 
Boston for the north side of Broadway from the Charlestown 
line to Fellsw^ay east. Under an act passed by the legislature 
these companies will continue to bury their wires for the next 
four years, spending $20,000 each year. Burying the wires not 
only does away with the unsightly poles, but also saves the 
shade trees. 

The total number of feet of conduits in the city is 66,100. 

Accepted Streets. 

Nine streets have been accepted during the year, a total 
length of about 4,758 feet. Twelve streets were constructed and 
one partially constructed at a cost of $22,730.45, from which 
amount should be deducted the sum of $1,400, which was appro- 
priated to purchase land on Veazie street. The total length con- 
structed was 8,782 feet. In all streets that were constructed 
during the past two years, edgestones were set and gutters 
paved with granite blocks before the construction work was be- 
gun. This is a good custom to follow in the future. 

Perambulation of Boundary Lines. 

A committee was appointed to represent Somerville, con- 
sisting of the chairman of the highway committee, the city 
engineer, and the street commissioner, to meet a committee from 
Arlington on Friday, December 15, 1905, for the purpose of 
perambulating the boundary line between Somerville and 
Arlington. The same committee, represented Somerville on 
January 1, 1906, in the perambulation of the Somerville-Cam- 
bridge line, a similar committee representing Cambridge being 
present. This committee has attended to its duties and made its 
reports. 

Sidewalks Maintenance. 

Some of the sidewalks that have been laid in the oldest 
parts of the city, and where sewer, water, and gas trenches have 
been made, need attention. I hope the appropriation for side- 
walks maintenance will be increased so that the department can 
make needed repairs on some of the old sidewalks that were laid 
years ago. 

I think it is money in the city treasury to make a good ap- 
propriation for this kind of work rather than pay damages to 
pedestrians who get hurt on these sidewalks and sue the city. 

If the names of certain streets in different parts of the city, 
which are known by the same name, were changed it would be 
a great convenience to the public. 



STREET COMMISSIONER. 325 

Miscellaneous. 

No department, company, or corporation should be allowed 
to open any street or sidewalk after the frost sets in unless in a 
case of emergency. » 

The department maintains its own painter, carpenter, 
blacksmith, horseshoer. and harness repairer, all employed at the 
city stable. 

The department has installed in the blacksmith shop an 
electric calk sharpener, whereby horses' shoes can be sharpened 
without taking- them ofif, in from five to fifteen minutes, thus 
saving time, expense, and the horses' hoofs. This machine is 
used in the summer time for sharpening axes, maddoxes, grub 
hoes, and in fact all edge tools. 

A much-needed improvement was added to the stable in 
the building of a drying room. 

This department has been called upon to furnish steam 
rollers, teams, crushed stone, sand, gravel, and ashes to the 
other departments, being reimbursed for the same. 

Twenty-eight streets were macadamized and re-surfaced at 
a cost of $1G,316.44, a total length of 21,970 feet. $10,230.54 
was spent for general repairs. There are 70.223 miles of public 
streets, and 23.497 miles of private streets, making a total length, 
of 93.720 miles in the city. 

220 permits were issued to the Cambridge Gas Light Com- 
pany, and ninety-eight to the Charlestown Gas and Electric 
Company for the opening of streets for gas connections and re- 
pairs. 

180 permits were issued to occupy and forty to open the 
streets ; six to blast rock, and forty to cross sidewalks to con- 
tractors and corporations ; thirteen tO' erect canopies ; twelve to 
feed horses ; and five to run steam rollers through the streets. 
Eighty-three permits were given to licensed drain layers to open 
streets for sewer connections. 

638 defects in the streets and sidewalks which werp re- 
ported by the chief of police were promptly repaired, thereby 
in all probability saving the city from lawsuits. 

Seventy-eight signs and guide posts were painted and 
erected by the department during the year. 

521.7 square yards of crossings and 218.1 square yards of 
driveways were paved with granite blocks, flagging, and brick. 
123.3 square yards of vitrified brick and granite crossings and 
5,994.9 square yards of block stone gutters were laid, costing 
$10,173.17. 

2,747 yards of sand and gravel were used in this branch of 
the work. 8,525 loads of dirt and 3,477 loads of scrapings were 
removed from the streets. 4,838 loads of old macadam and 
1,193 loads of ballast were used in the repair and construction 



326 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

of streets. 2,298 loads of ashes were used in the repairs and 
construction of sidewalks and in setting and resetting of edge- 
stones. I 

1,386 square yards of granolithic and 5,148.7 square yards 
of brick sidewalks have been laid, and 17,788.6 feet, or nearly 
3.369 miles, of edgestone and inside curbing have been set at a 
cost of $21,274.63. 4,206.8 feet of edgestone were reset, and 
1,453.8 square yards of brick sidewalks relaid at a cost of 
$2,993.05. This amount includes patching sidewalks and at- 
tending to police reports of defects. 

Recommendations. 

I would most respectfully recommend that permanent pav- 
ing be laid on Cross street from the asphalt paving at Tufts 
street to Medford street, and on Highland avenue from Med- 
ford street to School street, especially in front of the public 
buildings on Central hill ; that Somerville avenue from Kent 
street to Oak square, and Washington street from opposite 
Tufts street to the Charlestown line be paved with granite pav- 
ing blocks, and the brick paving extended on Elm 'street from 
Davis square to Chester street; that Summer street from Bel- 
mont street to Cutter square be macadamized, and School 
street from Medford street to Broadway could be put in first- 
class condition with the old material excavated if the bitulithic 
paving was extended on Medford street ; that edgestones be set 
and gutters paved with blocks on the south side of Elm street 
from White street to Cutter square ; Beacon street, south side 
from Washington street to Park street. College avenue from 
Broadway to the Medford line, and Medford street from the 
Boston & Maine railroad bridge to Highland avenue, where not 
already set. 

As there is an unexpended appropriation for the paving of 
the lower end of Broadway, it is to be hoped that the city gov- 
ernment will come to some decision upon this matter this year, 
as this street is sadly in need of repair. I hope to see in the 
near future Medford street, from Highland avenue to 'Somer- 
ville avenue, paved with some kind of permanent paving, and 
Mystic avenue thoroughly repaired. 

I wish to extend my sincere thanks to his honor, the 
mayor, the board of aldermen, heads of departments, and all 
city oflficials with whom I am associated, and the general public, 
for their able support and hearty co-operation ; and I would ex- 
press my appreciation of the conscientious work and efficient 
service of the foremen, inspectors, teamsters, laborers, and all 
others employed in the department. 



STREET COMMISSIONER. 



327 



Highways Maintenance Account. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriation 

Receipts and credits: — 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, street 

railway tax 

Boston Eievated Railway tax . ' . 
Warren Brothers, use of steam road roller, 
Materials furnished prior to January 1, 
1905, the bills for which remained un- 
collected that day ..... 
Value of materials on hand January ], 1905 . 
Value of tools and property on hand January 
1, 1905 . . .'• . 



Less amount transferred to Health Department Account, 
collection of ashes and offal . 



Profit and loss on tools, property, and materials 



' ' DEBIT. 

Expenditures. — 

For repairs of sundry streets as per table B, at end of 

this report 
General repairs of streets 



gravel sidewalks 



care of slippery sidewalks 



Repairs of stone paving 

Repairs and maintenance of 

Repairs of street crossings 

Cleaning streets . 

Removing snow and ice and 

Repairs of gutters 

Care of subway 

Removing trees 

Trimming trees 

Setting trees . 

Setting steps at Broadway terrace 

Setting circle, Veazie street, at Marshall street 

Holland-street sidewalk assessment . 

Setting edgestones, northerly side Broadway, from Main 

street to opposite Norwood avenue . . . . 
Serving notices of hearings and copies of hearings before 

county commissioners on proposed construction of 

Lowell-street bridge . . . . . 
Removing turnout, Broadway, near Franklin 

street ' $266 27 

Less amount paid bv Boston Elevated R. R. 

Co. . . " 200 00 



Building shed for tools 

Blacksmithing 

Carpentering 

Painting . . ^ . 

Street Commissioner's salary 

Amount carried forward 



$4,000 00 



$50,165 40 




8,107 66 




52 25 




60 85. 




1,889 80 




21,723 73 






81,999 09 






$85,999 69 


ent Account, 




. 


4,000 00 




$81,999 69 


iterials . 


4,420 45 



$86,420 14 



$16,316 44 

10,230 54 

4 50 

1,764 91 

632 37 

12,018 06 

7,884 26 

775 40 

187 00 

186 60 

121 70 

97 75 

50 00 

8 50 

281 27 

1,363 09 



247 60 



66 27 


212 01 


465 25 


150 50 


82 00 


1,800 00 



$54,946 03 



328 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 

Street Commissioner's team, board of one horse 

Street Commissioner's telephone 

Street signs and erecting same . 

Wakefield Gravel Land, taxes for 1003 and 1004 

Health Department (bill unpaid December 31, 1905) 

Sundry expenses 

Books, stationery, printing, and postage . 

Abatement of accounts for collection . . . *. 
Value of materials on hand this day . . . . 
Value of tools and personal property on hand this day-— 

Horses $.5^940 00 



Carts and* implements used with horses 
Harnesses and horse clothing 
.Stable utensds and property 

Tools 

Steam road rollers .... 
Stone crusher and fittings , 
Street signs . ... 



5.824 50 

830 90 

525 60 

1,865 96 

7.500 00 

1,701 00 

132 50 



Total debit . 
Balance unexpended 



$54,946 02 
251 60 

22 87 
367 82 
103 01 

48 00 
942 63 

91 34 

6 00 

613 83 



24,380 46 

$81,773 58 
$4,646 56 



Highways Construction Account. 



CREDIT. 



Balance from 1904 

Appropriation 

Transfer from Highways, Paved Gutters and 

Crossings . . . . ■ . 

Transfer from Sidewalks Construction . 
Transfer from Public Buildings Construc- 
tion, addition to Bingham schoolhouse. 



Less transfer to Highways, Paved Gutters 
and Crossings, account 

Less transfer to Shade Trees and Guards ac- 
count ....... 

Less transfer to Public Buildings Construc- 
tion, dormitory at city home 

Less transfer to engine house in Ward Two, 

Less transfer to Proctor schoolhouse com- 
pletion 

Less transfer to rifle range at Waltham 

Less transfer to historical building and ob- 
servatory at Prospect Hill . . . 

Less transfer to contagious disease hospital 
and land . . . . > . . 

Less transfer to Sidewalks Construction 



$2,518 84 
20,000 00 



$10,000 00 
5,000 00 

14 96 

$15,014 96 

$2,500 00 

200 00 

75 64 
263 18 

1,029 16 
213 43 

159 89 

2,300 00 
1,500 00 



$8,241 30 



Amount carried forward 



$6,773 66 
$29,292 50 



1 STREET COMMTSSIONER. 329 

Amount brought forward $29,292 50 

Receipts: — 

Sale of Wakefield gravel land . . . $1,200 00 

Highways Maintenance, stone from con- 
struction of Clarendon avenue . . 4,221 27 

Highways Maintenance, paving blocks and 

round stone 23 65 

Highways, paving Pearl and Medford 
streets and Oilman square, paving 
blocks ' . . 10 35 

Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings, 

paving blocks 221 39 

Sidewalks Construction, paving blocks . 4 88 

$5,681 54 



Total credit . . $34,974 ()4 

DEBIT. 

Expenditures: — • 

Construction or partial construction of 

streets as appears by table A, at end 

of this report $40,433 56 

Less assessments . . . . . . 7,680 48 

; $32,753 08 

Paving Somerville avenue, in front of J. P. Squire's box 

factory ..... 835 22 

Paving Highland avenue, from Davis square, easterly 

100 feet 1,261 52 

Advertising and recording releases for 

streets not constructed 103 55 



$34,953 37 



Balance unexpended $20 6" 



Highways, Paved Gutters and Crossings, 

CREDIT. 

Appropriation . . . . . . $20,000 00 

Less amount transferred to Highways Con- 
struction 7,500 00 



$12,500 00 

Less amount overdrawn in 1904 . . . 2,062 41 

$10,437 59 

Value of materials on hand January 1, 1905 .... 270 00 

Net gain on materials 146 22 

$10,853 81 



DEBIT. 



Expenditures: — 

For paving nineteen gutters as per table F $9,662 81 

Street crossings as per table J . . . 510 36 
Public Buildings Construction, engine 

house. Ward Two, paving blocks . 36 40 

Value of materials on hand this day . . 339 38 

. Total debit. . ~ ^~^ $lQ>5-^8 ^^ 

Balance unexpended j 1?^ ^^ 



.'330 



ANNUAL EEPOETS. 



Highways, Paving Broadway, Bow and Summer Streets. 

CREDIT. 

Balance of appropriation of 1904 . . . $8,136 02 



Transfer from Sewers Construction account. 
Total credit 



8,000 00 



DEBIT. 

Warren Bros. Co., final payment on account of contract . 
Balance unexpended 



$16,130 02 



$591 85 
$15,544 17 



Highways, Watering Streets, 

CREDIT. 

Receipts: — 
Assessments and contributions from 

abutters $21,566 24 

Insurance on water carts (collected from 

contractors) 64 00 



Total credit 



DEBIT, 



Expenditures: — 
Inspector 

Teaming (street watering) 
Repairing carts 
Painting carts 
Horseshoeing 
Insurance on carts 
New buggy 
Repairing buggy 
New harness . 
Water posts . 
Repairing posts 
Horse doctoring 
Books 

Clerical assistance, 
list . 



making 



Total debit 
Balance unexpended 



up assessment 



$690 30 

17,978 99 

1,364 87 

994 49 

25 00 

63 00 

160 00 

7 50 

20 00 

49 77 

145 16 

4 00 

14 50 

105 34 



$21,630 24 



$21,622 92 
$7 32 



Highways, Removing Brown-Tail Moths. 

CREDIT. 



Appropriation 

Transfer from Interest account 

Receipts: — 

From Public Grounds account . 

From Public Buildings Manitenance, 

schoolhouses 

From sundry persons 



$3,000 00 
1,500 00 



$35 00 

21 50 

283 96 



$4,500 00 



340 46 



Total credit 



$4,840 46 



STREET COMMISSIONER, 



331 



DEBIT. 

Expenditures: — 
Labor, removing brown-tail moths from 

trees 
City teams, use of 
Inspector 
Tools 

Books, stationery, and stamps 
Horseshoeing 
Sleigh 
Tanglefoot 
Creosote 



Balance unexpended 



$3,821 


50 


201 


60 


509 


70 


157 


36 


37 


75 


3 


50 


25 


00 


3 00 


36 25 



$4,795 66 

$44 80 



Highways, Shade Trees and Tree Guards. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriation $1,400 00 

Transfer from Highways Construction ac- 
count . 200 00 



Receipts: — 

Sale of shade trees 
Sale of wire netting 



Total credit 



Expenditures: — 
For 651 trees . 

Freight on same . 
Labor, setting trees 
Posts for tree guards 
Wire netting . 
Tools and hardware 
Use of city teams . 



Total debit 



Balance unexpended 



DEBIT. 



$151 00 
95 



$486 87 


8 80 


681 75 


172 13 


284 76 


5 50 


112 00 



$1,600 00 



151 95 
$1,751 95 



$1,751 81 
$0 14 



Sidewalks Construction Account. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriation 

Transfer from Sewers Construction account. 
Transfer from Highways Construction ac- 
count 



Less transfer to Highways Construction ac- 
count 



$16,000 00 
2,000 00 

1,500 00 

$19,500 00 

5.000 00 



Amount .carried forward 



$14,500 00 



332 ANNUAL EEPORTS. 

Amount brought forward .... $14,500 00 
Materials furnished prior to January 1, 1905, 
the bill for which remained uncollected 
that day 31 12 



Total credit . $14,531 12 

DEBIT. 

Expenditures: — • 

For twenty-nine sidewalks con- 
structed as per table C . . $20,709 41 
Less assessments .... 10,354 70 



$10,354 71 


85 


55 


474 


95 


4 


72 


46 


00 


2,825 


45 



Constructing sidewalks as per table 1^ 
Constructing sidewalks as per table E 
Private work, the bills for which remained 

unpaid December 31, 1905 . 
Books, printing, and stationery . 
Amount overdrawn in 1904 .... 

$13,791 38 

Balance unexpended $739 74 

Sidewalks flaintenance Account. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriation $3,000 00 

DEBIT. 

Expenditures: — 

Bricks used in repairing sidewalks 

Labor 

City teams 

Sand and gravel .... 
Crushed stone .... 

Cement 

Paving bricks .... 

Total debit $2,993 05 

Balance unexpended . . . ... . . $6 95 



$340 


70 


2,180 


18 


309 40 


97 


39 


56 


66 


4 


25 


4 


47 



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STREET COMMISSIONER. 



337 



TABLE D. 
Sidewalks Constructed Where the Bricks and Edgestones Were 

Furnished by the Abutters. 



For 


o^ ^ Vards of 
Street. ^^-^^^^^ 


Cost to 

City. 


Chailes R. Elder . 
Thomas Kilmartin 
John McFarlane . 


47, 47-A 49, 49-A Beacon st. 
62, 66 Partridge avenue 
413, 415 Norfolk street 


124.1 
44.80 
30.40 


$45 20 
26 80 
13 55 




Total .... 


199.30 


. $85 55 



TABLE E. 

Granolithic Sidewalk Laid (the Edgestones being already set), the 
Abutters Paying the Excess above the Equivalent of One=half 
the Cost of a Brick Sidewalk. 



For 


Street. 


Square Yards. 


Cost to City. 


Caroline G. Baker . 


40 Benton road 


37.1 


$18 55 


Frank J. Dooling 


34 " '' . . 


27. 


13 50 


Caroline B. Fish 


50 '' " . . 


28.70 


14 35 


William Shannahan 


38 " ♦' . . 


30.40 


15 20 


Highland Association 


314 Highland avenue 


91.60 


45 80 


Wilbur P. Rice 


346-352 Highland avenue 


98.70 


49 35 


Edmund S. Sparrow 


415-417 " " 
Northerly side from brick 


74.30 


37 15 


Munroe Street Sidewalk ) 


sidewalk already laid to 
Prospect Hill avenue . 


i 439. 


281 05 




Total . 


826.80 


$474 95 



33a 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



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Meacham stre( 
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Main street 
Pearl street 
Packard avei 
Mt. Vernon : 
Morrison ave 
Lowell stree 
Grant street 
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Durham street 
Elm street 
Evergreen aveni 
P'arragut avenu( 
Hanson street 
Hawthorne stre 
*Holland street 
Main street 
Moreland street 
Mt. Vernon stre 
Ossipee road . 
Pearl street . 
Pritchard avenu 
Richardson stre 
Sydney street . 
Willow avenue 
Wilton street . 




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STREET COMMISSIONER. 



339 



TABLE Q. 
Driveways Constructed at Expense of Abutters, 



For. 



Albert C. Ashtoti 
Horace W. Andrews 
Elbridge G, Davis 
Charles H. Dearborn 
Reginald W. Doe 
William P. DeWitt 
Charles E. Edgerton 
Harry Gavel 
Joseph Gridley 
George O. Gustin 
Granville Hodgkins 
Henry A. and Leona F 
John E. Locatelli 
Julia A. McGlone 
New England Tel. and 



Hooper 



Tel. Co. 



Albert Ober 
Charles E. Parkhurst 
Edward J. Robertson 
Horatio B. Ruggles 
Edwin A. Simonds 
Winsor L. Snow 
John P. Squire & Co. 
Winter Hill Baptist Church 



Location. 



. 33 Columbus avenue 

. Glen street, rear 122 Broadway 

. Near 33 Jaques street 

90 Chandler street 

Richdale avenue, rear 174 School street 

15 Day street 

63 Boston street 

23 Partridge avenue 

Benton road, rear 179 Highland avenue 

. Chandler street, rear 922 Broadway 

12 Curtis street 

. 41 Monroe street 

Craigie street 

. 78 and 82 Line street 

. Pearl street 

Bradley street 

2G St. James avenue 

. 79 Walnut street 

108-A Beacon street 

15 Glen street 

38 Robinson street 

Day street, near Davis square 

Somerville avenue 

School street 



TABLE H. 
Driveways Discontinued at Expense of Abutters. 



For. 



Alphonso S. Colburn 
Mary D. Wilder . 



Location. 



51 School street 
17 School street 



TABLE I. 
Driveways Re=located at Expense of Abutters. 



For. 


Location. 


Zebedee E. Cliff 

North Shore Express Co. . 


Curtis street 
Myrtle street 



3-10 



ANNUAL EEPOKTS. 



TABLE J. 
Streets Accepted in 1905. 



Street. 


Ward. 


From 


To 


Width, 
Feet. 


Length, 
Feet, 


Hamlet street . . 
Hanson street . . 
Lexington avenue 
Nashua street . . 
Skehan street . . 
Thorpe place . . 
Vernon street . . 
Warren street . . 
Wheatland street 


3 
2 
6 
5 
2 
3 
5 
2 
4 


Highland ave. . 
Washington st. 
Hancock st. 
Richardson st. . 
Dane st. . . . 
Highland ave. . 
Glenwood road 
Medford st. . . 
Jaques st. . . 


Southw't'ly end 
Vine St. . . . 
Willow ave. . . 
B. & L. R. R. . 
Hanson st. . . 
Southw't'ly end 
Lowell St. . . 
Cambridge line 
Mystic avenue . 


30 
30 to 35 

50 

35 

30 

30 
30 to 40 
30 to 40 

40 


451 

SIG 
624 
637 
306 
468 
624 
109 
828 






Length in feet 




4,863 



TABLE K. 
Street Crossings Laid. 

BRICK. 

Albion street, across same, from westerly side of Centre street. 

Broadway, southerly side, across Thurston street. 

Mt. Vernon street, across same, from northerly side of Lincoln avenue. 

GRANITE FLAGGING. 

Broadway, across same, from westerly side of Curtis street. 
Lexington avenue, across same, from easterly side of Hancock street. 
Main street, easterly side, across Moreland street. 
Somerville avenue, southerly side, near Mossland street, from edgestone 

to car track. 
Somerville avenue, at Squire's estate at box factory, from edgestone to 

car track. 
Washington street, southerly side, across Perry street. 

Street Crossings Re=surfaced. 

Broadway, across same, at easterly side of Cedar street. 
Richdale avenue, across same, at westerly side of Essex street. 
Washington street, across same, at easterly side of Bowdoin street. 
Washington street, across same, at easterly side of Hawkins street. 



Length of Accepted Streets in Each Ward. 



W^ard 



Miles. 

9.182 

7.828 

7.260 

9.109 

10.625 

11.504 

14.715 



Total length of accepted streets in the city . . . 70.223 

Respectfully submitted, 
' Asa B. Peichakd, 

Street Commissioner. 



REPORT OF COnniSSIONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



} 



Office of Commissioner of Public Buildings, 
City Hall, Somerville, January 1, 1906. 
To the Honorable, the. Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen of 
the City of Somerville: — 

Gentlemen, — I have the honor, as commissioner of public 
buildings, to submit the following report of this department for 
the year 1905. 

Section 41, article third, of the city charter, relating to this 
department, is as follows: *'The public buildings department. 
This department shall be under the control of the commissioner 
of public buildings, who shall have charge of the construction, 
alteration, repair, maintenance, and care of public buildings, 
and shall also be the inspector of buildings." A brief summary 
of the work performed by this department in compliance with 
the above mentioned article of the city charter will be found in 
this report, as well as tables showing the result of the routine 
work. 

Inspection of Buildings. 

There have been issued during the year 1905, 311 permits 
for new buildings and alterations. This number is eight more 
than in 1904. 

The total estimated cost of new buildings and alterations in 
1905 was $870,530, while the same in 1904 was $959,540, show- 
ing a decrease of $89,010. 

During the year 1905 there have been 1,195 inspections of 
private buildings in the course of construction. These have in- 
cluded the inspection of construction, fire-stopping, chimneys, 
buildings damaged by fire, and foundations. 

The following is a table showing the number of permits 
in each ward for buildings, etc., and the U3es for which they were 
intended: — 











WARDS. 








Buildings. 














Tntal<; 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


G 


7 




Dwellings .... 


10 


16 


14 


4 


17 


54 


118 


233 


Dwellings and stores . 


1 


1 


1 











3 


6 


Stables 





1 





1 


I 








3 


Miscellaneous . . . 


12 


9 


10 


8 


8 


5 


8 


60 


Brick buildings . . . 


2 


1 


1 








1 


4 


9 


Total 


25 


28 


26 


13 


26 


60 


133 


311 



350 


185 


109 


. • 308 


$6 00 


2 00 


18 00 


11 00 



342 ANNUAL EEPOKTS. 

The number of plumbing permits issued during the year was 
Permits for plumbing in new buildings .... 

Permits for plumbing in old buildings 

Number of buildings in which pipes were tested by water 

Number of master plumbers' licenses, 8 at $2.00 . 

Number of journeyman's licenses, 4 at $.50 .... 

Number of master plumbers' licenses renewed, 36 at $.50 . 

Number of journeyman's licenses renewed, 22 at $.50 

Two applications for journeyman's licenses were rejected. 

Amount received in fees 37 00 

Proctor School. 

The Proctor school was completed and prepared for occu- 
pancy September 1 of this year. This building contains eight 
rooms for classes and one recitation room. Each classroom is 
intended to accommodate forty-nine pupils, and the recitation 
room thirty-five. The total cost of this school centre was 
$41,029.16. 

Health Department Building. 

The construction of a storage shed for the city oiifal, f^^r 
which an order was passed April 13, 1905, was completed, and 
the shed made ready for use in May of this year. The total cost 
of this building was $1,189.79. 

Bell School Fire Escape, 

The construction of the fire escape at the Bell school, for 
which an order was passed on June 22, 1905, has been com- 
pleted, and the escape is now ready for use. The total cost of 
this fire escape was $1,320. There is still some work to be done 
in connection with the approach to the escape inside the building, 
and this will be done the next vacation. 

Addition to Latin High School. 

The construction of the addition to the Latin High school, 
for which an order was passed by the board of aldermen on July 
13, 1905, was commenced in September of this year, and is still in 
progress. The estimates for the general contract on this build- 
ing were opened in the ofBce of the mayor, on Tuesday, Septem- 
ber 5. The contract was awarded to Frederick C. Alexander, he 
being the lowest bidder. 

During the summer vacation of 1905, alterations were made 
in the old part of the Latin High school building, which were 
shown in the original plan as referred to in the order as adopted 
by the board of aldermen on July 13, 1905. 

The addition to this building is being constructed on the 
rear of the building, and is 100 feet in width and fifty feet in 
depth. It is a four-story building, each floor of which is divided 



• COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 313 

into four rooms, with the necessary corridors, coat rooms, closets, 
etc. The entire addition contains eight classrooms, each room 
having" a seating capacity of forty-eight pupils, and eight recita- 
tion rooms, having a seating capacity of thirty pupils. The en- 
tire seating capacity of the addition is therefore 624. 

A corridor connecting the present English High school with 
the new addition to the Latin High school is also a part of this 
contract and will make it possible for a part of the new addition 
to be used for the accommodation of pupils going to the English 
High school. It is expected that the addition will be completed, 
and therefore ready for occupancy September 1, 1906. 



Electric Service, 

On March 22, 1905, new contracts were made by this de- 
partment with the Edison Electric Illuminating Company of Bos- 
ton for the furnishing of electric current for illuminating pur- 
poses in the public buildings of the city. These contracts were 
made to run for five years, and a material decrease in the cost of 
lighting was anticipated. This department has not been disap- 
pointed in the showing which has been made thus far in this 
account. 

The total amount for electric lighting during the year 1905 
was $4,391. For the same twelve months under the old contracts 
the amount would have been $6,300. It is, therefore, a fact that 
the new contracts show a saving to the city of $1,909 in the 
twelve months of the year 1905. 



Recommendations. 

I respectfully recommend that during the year 1906 the 
furnace systems in the Morse and Pope schools be removed and 
modern steam systems be installed. I believe that the saving of 
fuel would pay the interest on the amount requirea to make these 
changes. I would recommend that the engines in the Bell and 
Hanscom school buildings, now used to run the ventilation fans, 
be removed and the electric motors be substituted. These 
changes, I believe, will also show a material decrease in the cost 
of fuel in these buildings. 

I woidd further recommend that an appropriation be made, 
sufficiently large to make a general renovation of the Forster 
school building. This building after many years of constant ser- 
vice is badly in need of repairs, particularly on the outside. Sev- 
eral of the school buildings are without wall tinting, and inasmuch 
as the pupils of the schools are themselves purchasing pictures to 
adorn the walls of the various rooms, this department feels that 
the comparatively small amount required for such work would be 
wisely expended. ' I 



344 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Public Buildings, Care and Repair. 

It has been necessary during- the year 1905 to practice the 
strictest economy in the care of the pubHc buildings of the city, 
owing to the small amount of money available for this purpose. 
In fact the appropriation has proved inadequate for even the 
work which was necessary to be done in order to make the build- 
ings comfortable and well cared for. The following table will 
show in part the property which must be cared for and main- 
tained at all times, as well as watched carefully for defects and 
the results of wear and tear: — 

Buildings ; 43 

Steam plants 54 

Furnaces 32 

Classrooms (schools) 270 

Sets of school furniture 12,407 

Teachers' desks 804 

Visitors' chairs 608 

Electric motors 2 

Motor generators 1 

Sanitary systems 44 

The steam and furnace plants and sanitary systems require 
the most diligent attention, and must be watched carefully at all 
times for weak parts and defects. The perfect working of the 
steam and furnace plants is absolutely necessary in order to have 
the buildings comfortable and safe to occupy during the cold 
weather. This condition also applies to the sanitary systems, 
which must be at all times kept in good working condition and 
in repair. The appropriation recommended at the beginning of 
each year for the maintenance of the above-named items cannot 
be estimated accurately in advance, and often the expense in- 
curred during the year is in excess of the amount anticipated. 

In addition to the work already mentioned, there is a large 
amount of general repairs required on the buildings, such as car- 
penter work, mason work, roofing, glass breakage, painting, 
blackboard repairing, repairing fences, care of grounds, concret- 
ing, and general repairs of all kinds which must be attended to. 

In view of the work which should be performed this year in 
order to have the buildings in proper condition, I have in my 
recommendation for the appropriation for 1906 included a 
larger amount than usual and respectfully request that the same 
may be furnished as recommended. 

The following figures give the expenditures for the items of 
repairs and the care of the buildings for the year 1905 : — 

BAXTER SCHOOL. 

Janitor . $598 00 

Fuel 285 47 

Light, gas 22 80 

Repairs 125 33 

Supplies 11 48 

$1,043 OS 



COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



34:5 



Janitor 
Fuel . 

Light, electric 
Light, gas . 
Repairs 
Supplies 
Telephone 



BELL 


SCHOOL. 






$992 00 






702 20 






197 18 






141 74 






380 48 






47 05 






32 75 



$2,493 40 



BENNETT SCHOOL. 

Janitor 

Fuel 

Light, gas . . . . . 

Repairs * . 

Supplies 



$884 00 


638 77 


35 20 


39 71 


8 85 



1,606 53 



BINGHAM SCHOOL. 



Janitor 
Fuel . 
Light, gas . 
Light, electric 
Repairs 
Supplies 
Telephone 
Insurance 



$910 00 

929 36 

5 70 

22 99 

356 92 

29 36 

24 63 

50 00 





BROWN SCHOOL. 




Janitor 




$598 00 


Fuel . 




390 98 


Light, gas 




30 60 


Repairs 




65 42 


Supplies 




1 50 



2,328 96 



1,086 50 



BURNS SCHOOL. 



Janitor 
Fuel . 
Light, gas 
Repairs 
Supplies 



Janitor 
Fuel . 
Light, gas 
Repairs 
Supplies 
Telephone 





$663 00 




478 17 




38 80 




300 35 




6 35 


CARR SCHOOL. 






$1,144 00 




963 60 




23 20 




126 87 




8 18 




26 73 



1,486 47 



2,292 58 



346 



ANNUAL EEPOllTS. 



Janitor 
Fuel . 
Light, gas 
Repairs 
Supplies 



CUMMINGS SCHOOL. 



$494 00 

287 20 

2 55 

345 53 

41 12 



$1,170 40 



DAVIS SCHOOL. 

Janitor . . 

Fuel 

Light, gas 

Repairs 

Supplies • . 



$494 00 
304 83 

30 50 
379 31 

18 43 



1,227 07 



DURELL SCHOOL. 

Janitor 

Fuel 

Repairs 

Supplies 



$520 00 

228 92 

71 52 

26 69 



847 13 



EDQERLY SCHOOL. 



Janitor .... 


. ' . . . $832 00 


Fuel .... 


537 69 


Light, gas . 


83 20 


Repairs .... 


430 49 


Supplies .... 


22 34 


Telephone 


28 20 



1,933 9- 



FORSTER SCHOOL. 



Janitors 
Fuel . 

Light, electric 
Light, gas . 
Repairs 
Supplies 
Telephone 



$1,812 


00 


890 


70 


157 


28 


190 


70 


890 


62 


222 


29 


28 98 



4,192 57 



GLINES SCHOOL. 



Janitor 
Fuel . 

Light, electric 
Light, gas . 
Repairs 
Supplies 
Telephone . 
Furniture . 



$949 00 


535 11 


914 84 


24 10 


147 13 


10 82 


24 43. 


195 00 



2,800 43 



COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



;i7 



HANSCOn SCHOOL. 



Janitor 
Fuel . 
Light, gas 
Repairs 
Supplies 



$598 00 

364 60 

15 70 

143 85 

7 88 



$1,130 03 



ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL. 



Janitor 

Light, electric 

Light, gas . 

Repairs 

Supplies 

Telephone 

Furniture 



$1,356 00 


1,897 06 


98 90 


200 09 


55 40 


118 34 


242 50 



3,968 29 



LATIN HIGH SCHOOL. 



Janitor 

Fuel . 

Light, gas 

Repairs 

Supplies 

Telephone 

Furniture 



$1,764 50 


1,620 31 


15 70 


502 25 


87 26 


31 26 


17 50 



4,038 78 



HIGHLAND SCHOOL. 



Janitor 
Fuel . 
Light, gas . ^ 
Light, electric 
Repairs 
Supplies 
Telephone 
Furniture . 



$896 


00 


1,056 


28 


26 


50 


58 


55 


236 37 


22 


02 


27 


18 


16 81 



2.339 71 



HODGKINS SCHOOL. 



Janitor 

Fuel . 

Light, gas 

Repairs 

Supplies 

Telephone 

I'-urniture 






$884 00 


656 10 


27 00 


310 64 


78 87 


25 23 


25 25 



2,007 09 



348 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



KNAPP SCHOOL. 



Janitor 

Fuel . 

Light, gas 

Repairs 

Supplies 

Telephone 

Furniture 



$884 00 


675 78 


68 20 


277 37 


18 20 


35 10 


16 32 



$1,974 97 



LINCOLN SCHOOL. 

Janitor 

Fuel 

Repairs 

Light, gas 

Supplies 



$494 00 

186 81 

160 97 

5 48 

44 25 



891 51 



LOWE SCHOOL. 

Janitor ' . 

Fuel . . . . . 
Light, gas . . .- . 

Repairs 

Supplies 



663 00 


365 61 


48 80 


215 27 


14 82 



1,307 50 



PROSPECT HILL SCHOOL. 



Repairs 
Supplies 



Janitor 

Fuel . 

Light, gas 

Repairs 

Supplies 

Telephone 

Furniture 



Janitor 
Fuel . 
Light, gas 
Repairs 
Supplies 
Furniture 



$22 25 
6 39 



nORSE SCHOOL 






$884 00 




880 00 




25 70 




210 31 




12 48 




25 13 




109 15 


PERRY SCHOOL. 






$598 00 




451 72 




16 10 




103 96 




29 25 




13 41 



28 64 



2,146 77 



1,212 44 



COMMTSSTONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



149 





POPE SCHOOL. 




Janitor 




$884 00 


Fuel . 


/ 


865 98 


Light, gas . 




39 68 


Re'pairs 




359 69 


Supplies 




2 60 


Telephone 




27 59 



$2,179 54 



PRESCOTT SCHOOL. 



Janitor .... 


$912 00 


Fuel 


786 54 


Light, gas .... 


80 20 


Repairs .... 


. ... 198 32 


Supplies 1 . . . 


1 90 


Telephone 


26 71 



2,005 67 



PROCTOR SCHOOL. 



Janitor 


$242 25 


Fuel . 


83 70 


Light 


00 


Repairs 


136 85 


Supplies 


99 00 



561 80 



CENTRAL FIRE STATION. 



Fuel 


$452 89 


Light, gas . 


77 20 


Light, electric . 


514 54 


Repairs .... 


179 20 


Supplies 


95 07 


Furniture .... 


31 50 



1,350 40 



STEAflER NUMBER TWO. 



Fuel 


$243 28 


Light, gas 


188 92 


Light, electric . 


26 10 


Repairs .... 


73 55 


Supplies .... 


31 35 



563 20 



STEAriER NUriBER FOUR. 



Fuel 


162 49 


Light, gas . . . 


2 60 


Light, electric . 


110 04 


Repairs .... 


41 15 


Supplies .... 


9 80 



326 08 



350 



AKNUAL REPORTS. 



HOSE NUMBER TWO. 

Fuel . 

Light, gas . . . . 

Light, electric 

Supplies 



$182 57 

31 30 

87 95 

7 11 



$308 "93 



HOSE NUMBER THREE. 



Fuel .... 


$193 15 


Light, gas . 


3 92 


Light, electric . 


304 48 


Repairs .... 


1,022 32 


Supplies .... 

. 1 f 


440 72 



1,964 59 



HOSE NUMBER FIVE. 



Fuel 


$122 89 


Light, gas . 


3 00 


Light, electric . 


172 15 


Kepairs .... 


10 00 


Supplies .... 


30 



308 34 



HOSE NUMBER SIX. 



Fuel 


$136 70 


Light, gas .... 


9 80 


Light, electric . 


129 32 


Repairs .... 


17 60 


Supplies ; . . . 


17 81 



311 23 



HOSE NUriBER SEVEN. 



Fuel . 
Light, gas . 
Light, electric 
Repairs 
Supplies 



$1 



o9 37 
1 40 

74 75 
85 27 
50 61 



351 40 



CITY HALL. 



Janitor 
Fuel . 
Light, electric 
Light, gas . 
Repairs 
Supplies 
Furniture 



$1,645 00 


266 28 


1.022 36 


10 48 


602 07 


592 00 


151 70 



4,289 89 



OOlUMISSIONER OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



351 



CITY HALL ANNEX. 



Janitor . 
Fuel . 

Light, electric 
Repairs 
Supplies 
Insurance . 



$420 


00 


170 


08 


66 


74 


m 


41 


26 87 


50 


00 



$911 10 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Janitor 


$1,014 00 


Fuel 


448 94 


Light, electric . . . . 


1,675 15 


Light, gas 


• 37 90 


Repairs 


935 80 


Supplies 


91 43 



4,203 22 



POLICE STATION. 



Janitor .... 


$845 


00 


Fuel 


445 


17 


Light, electric . 


113 89 


Light, gas .... 


346 


00 


Repairs .... 


173 89 


Supplies .... 


88 


13 



2,012 08 



HEALTH DEPARTHENT. 

Fuel ^ . 

Light, electric 

Repairs 

Supplies : . . . 



$128 26 


103 67 


198 37 


14 00 



444 30 



HIGHWAYS DEPARTMENT. 



Fuel 


$61 78 


Light, electric .... 


104 66 


Light, gas .... 


00 


Repairs 


228 33 


Supplies 


35 17 



429 94 



PUBLIC GROUNDS. 

Fuel . $22 40 

Repairs 13 60 

Supplies 64 



36 64 



ro^ 



ANNtTAL REPORTS. 



SEWER DEPARTriENT. 



Fuel . 
Repairs 
Supplies 



$25 17 
4 50 
1 55 



$31 22 



SUPPORT OF POOR. 

Fuel $549 20 

Light, electric 81 01 

Light, gas 6 60 

Repairs 660 73 

Supplies ........ 21 82 



1,319 30 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



Fuel 

Light, electric 

Light, gas . 

Supplies 

Repairs 



$99 16 

98 67 

3 11 

69 30 

36 27 



306 51 



Conclusion. 

The foregoing brief review of the work which has been ac- 
complished during the year 1905, as well as the statistics given, 
will, I trust, convey some idea as to the work of the department 
of public buildings. In some instances it is possible that re- 
quests have been filed, instead of being attended to at once, 
owing to the utter impossibility of accomplishing everything 
needed in the line of improvement of existing conditions in the 
public buildings. 

The various items of work which have been thus filed, how- 
ever, are those which could be best postponed to some future 
date, when either a sufficient appropriation will be available or a 
better opportunity presents itself for doing the work. 

In closing I wish to express my sincere appreciation of the 
valuable help and advice which I have received from the board 
of aldermen, as a body, and as individual members. 

I desire, also, to gratefully acknowledge the continued sup- 
port of his honor, the mayor, in everything which has helped to 
make the department efficient, and to mention again, as in my 
last report, my appreciation of his interest in the work and his 
sound and wise advice. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter T. Littlefield, 

Commissioner of Public Buildings. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF ELECTRIC LINES AND 

LIGHTS. 



} 



OmCE OF COMMISSIONEK OF ElECTRIC LiNES AND LiGHTS, 

City Hall, January 1, 1906. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen : — 

Gentlemen, — I herewith submit my tenth annual report, for 
the year ending December 31, 1905. 



Electrical Department, 

This department has supervision of the fire alarm and police 
signal systems, which have received the necessary attention dur- 
ing the year. 

Under this department also comes the inspection of all build- 
ings equipped with electric light service, also all poles and wires 
in the city streets. 

All electric lights and private telephones, bells, etc., in all 
the public buildings have been maintained and kept in perfect 
order by this department. 

During the year 170 permits were issued for attachments of 
wires in buildings for electric light service, after careful inspec- 
tion of the same by this department. Also 154 poles have been 
replaced by new ones divided as follows : The Edison Electric 
Illuminating Company of Boston, 126 ; the New England Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Company of Massachusetts, 28 ; and 27 
new poles have been set as follows : The Edison Electric Illumin- 
ating Company of Boston, 13 ; the New England Telephone and 
Telegraph Company of Massachusetts, 14. 

Fire Alarm. 

TwO' new fire alarm boxes have been added during the year, 
located as follows : box 233, corner of Somerville avenue and 
Mystic street; box 238, American Tube Works, Church street, 
making a total of 108 boxes. 

There have been no large fires during the year, as all alarms 
have been given promptly and correctly, and the fire department 
was thus enabled to respond quickly. 

A portion of the boxes have been changed from 3 and 4- 
round to 2-round boxes, which has greatly reduced the number 
of blows on the bells and the whistle, and I would recommend 
that this work be still further extended. 



554 ANNUAL REPORa:S. 

The equipment of this department consists of the following: 
108 signal boxes, one eight-circuit repeater, one eighteen-circuit 
fuse board, eight tower strikers, thirty-three gongs, eight indi- 
cators, twenty small tappers, forty open circuit tappers, one auto- 
matic steam whistle, 392 cells storage battery, and 130 miles of 
wire. 

Twelve miles of old wire have been replaced by new. 

During the year this department has been called upon to 
answer fifty-one emergency calls to pick up dangerous wires. 

Owing to the large number of new buildings that have been 
erected in the western portion of the city, I would recommend 
that new signal boxes be added in this section in order to further 
protect the property. 



Police Signal. 

The usual careful attention has been given tO' the police sig- 
nal system, and it is in a good working condition. During the 
past year several miles of old wire have been replaced with new. 
Several of the telephones in the signal boxes have been repaired, 
and in some cases new ones installed in place of the old. 

I would recommend that two new boxes be added this year, 
and some of the instruments at the police station be replaced by 
new ones, as some of them have been in constant service for 
seventeen years. 



Underground Wires. 

An act was passed by the legislature and approved April 10, 
1905, to provide for the placing of wires underground in certain 
streets in this city, such streets being designated in the said act. 
The Edison Electric Illuminating Company of Boston has laid 
conduits in Broadway from the Charlestown line to Edmands 
street, and The New England Telephone and Telegraph Company 
of Massachusetts has laid conduits from the Charlestown line to 
Willow bridge. These companies will probably place their wires 
in said conduits and remove their poles and wires from the 
streets. The city has made arrangements for placing its wires 
underground in Broadway and has purchased the necessary iron 
posts for the fire alarm and police boxes. As the act calls for an 
expenditure of $20,000 each year by each corporation, our streets 
will present a very dififerent aspect in two or three years. Owing 
to the fact that the telephone company has several miles of 
underground pipes, one duct of which is for the use of the city, 
free of expense, it would seem good policy on the part of the city 
to place as much wire underground as possible each year, thus 
lessening the danger from high tension wires. 



COMMISSIONER OF ELECTRIC LINES AND LIGHTS. 



355 



Street Lights. 

There are at present 478 arc lights and 519 incandescent 
lights in service in the city. 

Owing to the laying out of new streets in the western part 
of the city, several new lights will be needed during the coming 
year. 

During the past year a number of arc lights have been dis- 
continued on side streets and two or more incandescent lights in- 
stalled in place of each arc light so' removed, and as three incan- 
descents can be maintained at a less cost than one arc light, it re- 
duces the cost very materially. 

The lighting service of the city will compare very favorably 
with that of the surrounding municipalities. 



Financial Statement. 

ELECTRICAL DEPARTHENT. 



CREDIT. 



Appropriation .... 

Transferred from Sewer Department 

Receipts: — 

D. F. McNeil, removing wire 
Welch & Hall Co., horse . 



Total credit 



$7,000 00 
700 00 

12 00 
40 61 



$7,752 61 



■ DEBIT. 

Expenditures: — 

Salaries $5,149 88 

Wires, insulators, etc 1,035 00 

Wagon repairs 103 70 

Harnesses and repairing same ... 79 05 

Fire alarm boxes 944 80 

Board of horses 300 00 

Incidentals . . . . . . . 477 98 

Total debit 

Amount overdrawn 



$8,090 36 

$337 75 



STREET LIGHTS. 

CREDIT. 

Appropriation $66,000 00 

Received from sundry persons for lighting 
Westwood road" with Welsbach lights, 
1904 39 60 

Total credit 



$66,039 60 



356 ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



DEBIT. 

Expenditures: — 

Electric lighting $65,885 49 

Changing location of poles and lights . 37 00 

Incidentals 8 00 

Total debit $65,930 49 



Balance unexpended $109 11 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edward Backus, 
Commissioner of Electric Lines and Lights. 



SOMERVILLE WATER WORKS. 



SOMERVILLE. MIDDLESEX CO., MASSACHUSETTS. 



Area of city, including land and water, about 4,22 square miles. 
Population, estimated, 71,000. 
Entire population on line of pipe and supplied witli water. 



Water works owned by City of Somerville. 

Construction commenced in 1868. 

Source of supply : Metropolitan system, taking water of the 

Nashua river at Clinton, Mass. 



Mayor 

Hon. Leonard B. Chandler. 

Water Commissioner 

Frank E. Merrill. 



Office of the Water Department, 

Room 10, City Hall. 



Department Buildings and Yard, 

Cedar street, near Broadway. 



REPORT OF THE WATER COMMISSIONER. 



} 



Office of the Water Commissioner, 
January, 1906. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen: — 

I present herewith my report for the year ending December 
31, 1905, this being the thirty-second annual report made by the 
water department : — 



Receipts and Expenditures. 

Water bills have been issued as follows : — 

"Annual" water charges, amounting to *. . . . 

"Additional" water charges, amounting to . 

"Metered" water charges, amounting to ... . 

Abatements made on the above charges .... 

Amount credited to Water Income account .... 

The account has credit for the amount received from the 
commonwealth of Massachusetts, distribution of 
entrance fees, water supplied outside of district, and 
water furnished water companies, 1905, under sec- 
tion 3, chapter 488, Acts 1895 

Amount received from water service assessments 

Amount received from costs . . . . . 

Amount received from labor and materials sold . 



$142,763 80 

5,096 16 

73,837 64 

$221,697 60 
$4,735 95 

$216,961 65 



Total 



809 65 
4,456 58 

299 00 
2,011 30 


$224,538 


18 



This amount was used under appropriation orders of the 
board of aldermen as follows : — 

For water works purposes : — 

Water works maintenance 
Water works extension . 

Refunds 

Abatements on water charges of 1904 
Miscellaneous accounts . 
Interest on water loan bonds . 
Maturing water loan bonds . 
Metropolitan water works assessment 

Amount carried forward $148,664 31 



$28,327 91 
16,796 18 




487 20 




30 99 




2,011 30 




4,450 00 

6,000 00 




90,560 73 


$148,664 31 





WATER DEPARTMENT. 359 

Amount brought forward ........ $148,604 31 

For other municipal purposes : — 

Sewers, maintenance $12,000 00 

Fire department 61,465 00 

Reduction of funded debt .... 2,408 87 



75,873 87 
$224,538 18 

In addition to the appropriations from water income to other 
municipal purposes enumerated above, water has been furnished 
without charge to all the city departments that have required its 
use. The value of this water, based on the charges of the year 
1899, is about $13,000. 

Department Receipts and Disbursements. 

water maintenance account. 

Dr. . Cr. 

Amount appropriated by board of aldermen 

from water income . ■ . . . $25,500 00 

Sundry receipts for labor and materials sold, 1,961 53 

Receipts from other sources .... 299 00 

Transfer from Water Works Extension ac- 
count . . . „ . . . 2,660 40 

Materials used in extension of the water 

works 11,937 67 

Amount expended for labor and materials 
for maintenance of the water works 
and renewals of pipe .... $28,327 91 

Amount expended for materials used in ex- 
tension of the water works . . . 11,937 67 

Miscellaneous accounts 1,961 53 

Unexpended balance 131 49 



$42,358 60 $42,358 60 

water works extension account. 

Dr. Cr. 

Amount appropriated by board of aldermen 

from water income .... $15,000 00 

Receipts from 220 water service assessments, 4,456 58 

Sundry receipts for labor and materials sold. 49 77 

Labor and materials used in extension of 

the water works $16,796 18 

Miscellaneous accounts 49 77 

Transfer to Water Maintenance account . 2,660 40 



$19,506 35 $19 506 35 

Cost of Water Works. 

The total cost of the water works on December 31, 1904, 
as represented by the expenditures from appropria- 
tions for water works extension was .... $838,706 95 

Expended during the year 1905, on extension account . 16,796 18 

Total expenditures, December 31, 1905 .... $855,503 13 



360 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Water Debt. 

Water loan bonds have been issued on funded debt account 
to the amount of $1,017,000; this has been reduced by $915,000, 
leaving the water debt on December 31, 1905, $102,000. 

The outstanding bonds mature as follows : — 



Year. 


Amount. 


Year. 


Amount. 


1906 


$16,000 


1914 


$6,000 


1907 


17,000 


1915 


5,000 


1908 


7,000 


1916 


5,000 


1909 


6,000 


1917 


5,000 


1910 


6,000 


1918 


5,000 


1911 


6,000 


1919 


4,0CO 


1912 


6.000 


1920 


2;ooo 


1913 


6,000 







Extension of Water Distribution System. 

The accompanying table gives the location and description of 
new water mains laid during the year, number and size of gates 
set, number and kind of hydrants, blow-offs, and waterposts con- 
structed. To obtain a circulation of water through Delaware 
street, the main in that street was extended to a connection with 
Pearl street, thus removing an old "dead end." Pipes were laid 
and extended in the other streets shown in the table, for house 
requirements. The total number of feet of new mains laid, includ- 
ing hydrant, blow-ofif, and waterpost branches, was 4,047, making 
the water pipe mileage of the city approximately ninety miles, 
1,574 feet. Fifteen fire hydrants and fifteen water-gates have 
been added to the system during the year ; one blow-off has been 
constructed in Pearl street, and one waterpost, for the use of the 
street watering department, has been set on Packard avenue, 
near the boulevard. 

The water service system has been extended by making 220 
house connections, for which 9,155 feet of pipe was laid, with 
necessary corporation, curb and cellar cocks and fittings. The 
cost of these connections, including materials, labor,^ teams, and 
tools, has averaged $21.13, and the average amount received 
therefor in water service assessments has been $20.26. 

One eight-inch fire service was laid for the box mill of John 
P. Squire & Co., on Somerville avenue, at their expense, and two 
private fire hvdrants were set by that company in their yard. 

The following table gives a summary of the pipes and fix- 
tures of the water system, December 31, 1905: — 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 361 

Summary of Pipes and Fixtures. 

Feet of main pipe (approximately) . . . 476,774 

Feet of service pipe (approximately) . . . 382,460 

Service connections (approximately) . . . 11,279 

Public fire hydrants . . . . . . 1,001 

Private fire hydrants 49 

Gates 1,358 

Check valve? 7 

Meters 2,092 

Waterposts 73 

Blow-offs . 136 

Drinking fountains and troughs .... 10 

Maintenance and Renewals. 

A new sixteen-inch iron water main has been laid in Pearl 
street, from Cross street to a connection with the metropolitan 
main near Walnut street, in place of the old six-inch iron and 
cement-lmed main, and all the side street connections therewith 
have been renewed, and hydrants and gates reset. This pipe line 
now furnishes an abundant supply of water direct from the metro- 
politan main to the lEast Sonierville district. 

The hydrant formerly standing on Pearl street, near Dana, 
was moved to Dana street, near the corner of Pearl street, and a 
stop-gate was placed so as to permit its service on either the 
Pearl-street or the Dana-street main. , The hydrant formerly on 
Pearl street, near Wigglesv\^orth street, was moved around the 
corner on Wigglesworth street, and the hydrant near Delaware 
street was moved to three feet east from Pearl terrace. 

This work practically concludes the renewal of the water 
distribution system, which was commenced in 1884 by the sub- 
stitution of iron for cement-lined water pipes. As evidence that 
we now have a substantially constructed and practically tight 
main distribution system, we record that there have been no 
breaks in the mains and but eight joint leaks discovered during 
the year, and the cost of repairs per mile of pipe has been but 
eighty-seven cents. 

In addition to the general renewal work in connection 
with Pearl street, fire hydrants have been set in Arthur street, 
Cottage avenue. Oak street, and Webster avenue, in place of de- 
fective ones removed, and the hydrant formerly on Main street, 
corner of Moreland, has been reset five feet from the corner of 
the street. 

The twelve-inch gate in Medford street, formerly 100 feet 
west from Chester avenue, was moved to the west line of Chester 
avenue, on account of changes in the location of the street car 
tracks, and the cost was paid by the Boston Elevated Railway 
Company. 

On account of the erection of a dwelling house, the water- 
post formerly standing on Holland street, near Elmwood street, 
was moved to a more favorable location on Paulina street, oppo- 
site the Hodgkins school. ! 

The drinking fountains at Oilman square and Union square 
have been supplied, with ice during the summer months. The 



362 . ANNUAL EEPORTS. 

Franklin park fountain, which was frequently damaged by those 
for whose benefit it was intended, was removed for repairs, and 
has not been reset. The horse troughs have been regularly and 
thoroughly cleaned, the practice being to wash them twice a week 
during the summer and once a week during the winter season. 
The base of the ornamental trough in Oilman square has been 
again broken by the pole of some heavy team ; this trough would 
do well on a boulevard, or in a district where light teaming pre- 
vails, but is not substantial enough for use by heavy teams and 
careless drivers. The old pipe connection to this fountain was 
abandoned and a new one made in another location, previous to 
the laying of the bitulithic pavement in the square. 

The blow-ofifs in various sections of the city have been used 
frequently to clear the pipes of sediment and dead water. 

The maintenance of our fire hydrant system requires a con- 
stant inspection during the winter months and careful oversight 
at all times to ensure its efficiency. The severity of the past two 
winters, when, in some places, the frost went intO' the ground to a 
depth of five feet, has heavily taxed this branch of our work, but 
in no case has a hydrant been out of order when it has been 
needed for use by the firemen. Hydrants and gates have been 
renewed, packed, and oiled, gate boxes raised and lowered to 
grade of streets, and incidental repairs made wherever necessary. 

Service pipes, on account of their small size, wear out by 
corrosion and other causes much quicker than the large mains, 
and the maintenance of this department of the water works re- 
quires a considerable outlay. Several years ago the rule was es- 
tablished that the city would bear the expense of necessary re- 
newal of service pipe and fittings within the street lines, but that 
the cost of renewals in private grounds should be paid by the 
property owner ; this has led to a better care and protection of 
the water fixtures on the part of the owner. It is found necessary 
to set many curb-cocks on the older services, where it was the 
custom of earlier times to lay the pipes without them, and to 
raise to grade many service boxes that have been carelessly cov- 
ered over in the building of sidewalks ; iron boxes have to be set, 
also, to replace old wooden ones and others that have become 
damaged. Forty-five service pipes have been renewed, and 167 
leaks from various causes have been repaired. Much trouble is 
experienced with services in a cold winter, and it frequently be- 
comes necessary to thaw those in which the water becomes frozen, 
sometimes, as during the past winter, from the house clear to the 
street main. The service department of the work is a busy one, 
and its labors and expenses are unlikely to grow less with ad- 
vancing age of the pipes and fixtures with which it has to do. 

Inventory. 

The annual inventory of stock on hand, tools and machinery, 
teams and stable equipment, pumping apparatus, and furniture 



WATEK DEPAKTMENT. 363 

shows a valuation of $22,980.41 ; the land and buildings of the 
department are valued at $32,100, and the distribution system 
of the water works has an estimated valuation of $8G5,000. 

Water Consumption. 

The necessity of restricting our water consumption again 
becomes apparent from a recent estimate of the metropolitan 
water and sewerage board, showing an increase of $2,700, or 
about three per cent., in our annual water assessment, based on 
the "valuation and consumption" apportionment. Acts of 1904, 
over the estimated "valuation and population" apportionment 
which has heretofore been in effect under Acts of 1895. The ad- 
vantage of having a metered system at the present time is illus- 
trated in the case of a neighboring city, which is largely metered, 
where it is estimated that the state water assessment will be about 
thirty per cent, less this year, on the present consumption basis 
of apportionment, than it would have been on the former basis of 
population. The tendency of unmetered cities is to an increas- 
ing per capita consumption of water, and while the average of 
eighty-nine gallons daily for Somerville, as shown by the Metro- 
politan meters in 1905, is not as low as it might or should be, 
it is gratifying to note that there has been no increase over the 
previous year. This is imdoubtedly due, in a measure, to the 
extension of our local meter system, and as this system grows 
and is extended to cover in the more wasteful class of property, 
it should show not merely a restriction of the consumption to the 
present figure, but a material reduction, with its subsequent 
benefits. 

At the present time less than twenty per cent, of our ser- 
vices are metered, and if we should proceed to install meters at 
the rate of 1,000 per year, it would then require about twelve 
years to complete the work. Somerville should be willing to do 
its part in the work of restricting water waste, to the end that 
further extension of the metropolitan works, with the large ex- 
penditures that will be required therefor, may be postponed as 
long as possible. I recommend, therefore, that the water works 
appropriation for the coming year be made sufficiently large to 
provide for the installation of 1,000 meters. 

It is sometimes remarked that the installation of a meter 
system will reduce the water income ; this may or may not be the 
result. Many consumers are finding their rates much lower by 
the use of meters, others are paying more than under the old 
"annual" rates, on account of having defective plum'bing in their 
houses, with its consequent waste of water. A certain class of 
property which has been rated relatively high will undoubtedly 
pay less under the meter schedule, and another class which has 
been rated disproportionately low will pay more than heretofore. 
Whatever the result may be with regard to the income, the ad- 



364 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



vantage will be gained of the establishment of rates on an equi- 
table basis and the reduction of water waste, and if in the future 
it should be deemed necessary or advisable to increase the rates, 
the method would be simple and within the statutory powers of 
the mayor. Notwithstanding the large increase in the number 
of meters, the income from water rates in 1905 showed a gain of 
nearly $1,000 over the previous year. 

Eight hundred and thirty-four meters were set during the 
year, including 123 to commence operation January 1, 1906 ; of 
this number, the use of fourteen has been discontinued for non- 
occupancy of premises and other causes, making a net increase 
of 820. The total number now in the system is 2,092, as shown 
in the following table : — 

HETERS DECEMBER 31, 1905. 











Size 










Kind 


















TotaL 


%" 


%" 


1" 


IVa" 


2" 


3" 


4" 


6" 


Nash . . . 


172 
















172 


Empire . . 


1 
















1 


Crown . . . 


5 


6 


3 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


20 


Gem . . . 














1 




1 


Hersey . . 






5 


1 


2 


3 






11 


Hersey Disc 


215 


16 


5 


1 


3 








240 


Torrent . . 
















1 


1 


Trident . . 


165 


45 


23 


6 


6 


1 


1 




247 


Crest . . . 










1 








1 


Union . . . 


18 


11 


7 


1 


5 


1 


1 




44 


Union Special 




15 


4 


2 










21 


Columbia . . 


93 
















93 


King . . . 


60 
















66 


Lambert . . 


971 


106 


9 












1,086 


Worthington 




















Disc . . . 


78 
















78 


Totals . . 


1,784 


199 


56 


13 


18 


6 


4 


2 


2,082 


Motor and ele- 




















vator registers 


















10 




2,092 



rietropolitan Water. 



The annual assessments paid by 
part of the cost and operation of th 
are given below : — 



this city as its proportionate 
e metropolitan water works 



Year. 

1898 
1899 
1900 
J901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1D05 



Sinking Fund. 
No division made 



Maintenance. 



$1-2.491 73 
19.014 85 
15,748 5G 
16,404 42 
21,358 11 



$12,033 79 
12,955 64 
12,768 10 
15,393 87 
13,666 71 



Interest. 



^32,291 24 
30,427 40 
48,776 77 
54,938 64 
55,535 91 



Total. 
$14,250 19 
20.975 58 



28,689 
56,816 
62,397 
77,288 
86,736 98 
90,560 73 



24 
76 
89 
43 



$437,715 75 



iVATEK BEPARTMENT. 365 

There has been credited to the city by the commonweaUh 
as its proportion of the amounts received from entrance fees^ 
water suppHed outside the district, and water furnished to water 
companies the sum of $8,355.80. 

The daily consumption of water in Somerville, as recorded 
by the Venturi meters, operated by the metropohtan water and 
sewerage board, is shown below by months for the year 1905 : — 

Month. Gallons. Month. Gallons. 

January 6.622,600 July 6,806.700 

February 7,565,000 August 6,240.100 

March 5,935,600 September 5,951.400 

A.pril 5,485,300 October 5,813,600 

May 5,896,300 November 5,538.000 

June -. 6,077,100 December 5,965,700 

The total consumption for the year is 2,248,741,000 gallons, 
making an average daily consumption of 6,160,900 gallons. 

The following table shows the daily per capita consumption 
of water in the cities and towns in the metropolitan water district 
for the year 1905, as registered by the metropolitan meters : — 

For 
the 
Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Year 

Boston 158 168 146 134 137 140 144 148 147 145 144 153 151 

Somerville 92 105 82 76 81 84^ 93 90 85 83 80 85 80 

Maiden 46 49 46 44 46 47 50 53 54 54 52 54 53 

Chelsea 150 168 126 99 93 96 97 93 91 88 88 99 110 

Everett 104 114 93 87 88 84 81 77 77 79 79 82 89 

Quincy 97 106 101 99 105 107 118 118 112 111 113 102 109 

Medford 80 88 79 76 86 90 98 102 99 94 89 90 97 

Melrose 102 113 106 101 107 109 117 109 114 108 109 118 112 

Revere 77 91 69 m 67 71 80 84 77 65 61 67 78 

Watertown 57 62 64 59 68 72 80 82 79 73 67 65 70 

Arlington 71 79 70 65 80 84 107 87 78 73 65 69 81 

Milton 34 35.35 36 46 41 51 45 41 44 36 37 43 

Winthrop 96 110 91 94 99 103 124 135 114 94 87 97 113 

Stoneham 80 97 84 82 93 89 93 80 81 71 64 64 81 

Belmont 34 50 50 47 60 55 75 87 58 51 48 37 61 

Swampscott 74 79 70 70 73 86 113 112 83 74 73 92 88 

Lexington 77 80 76 75 80 81 105 88 76 74 65 54 74 

Nahant 49 63 41 49 60 62 87 77 62 47 71 Q6 74 

Total 134 144 124 114 118 120 125 128 126 123 122 129 129 

The district, in order of per capita consumption, beginning 
with the lowest, stands as follows : — i 

1 Milton 43 8 — Swampscott 88 

2 M alden 53 9 — Somerville 89 

3— Belmont 61 9— Everett 89 

4_Watertown "0 10— Medford 97 

5_Lexington 74 H— Quincy 109 

5— Nahant "74 12— Chelsea 110 

0_Revere 78 13— Melrose 112 

7— Arlington 81 14— Winthrop 113 

7— Stoneham 81 15— Boston 151 



oGC AJ^NtJAL EEPORTS. 

About fifteen gallons per capita per day of Somerville's con- 
sumption is for commercial purposes, leaving seventy-four gal- 
lons per capita for public and domestic use and waste. Of the 
ten cities and towns standing lower in consumption than Somer- 
ville, two are entirely metered, two are very largely metered, and 
the remainder are residential towns, with very little or no manu- 
facturing. 

The metropolitan meter at Webster avenue has been en- 
larged to one of twenty-four-inch diameter, with a throat of eight 
inches. The meter at Broadway, near Marshall street, and 
that at Willow avenue, near Elm street, have been closed during 
the year, the city being now supplied through four meters in the 
low-service district and two in the high-service system. The 
water furnished by the metropolitan works has continued of good 
quality throughout the year. The great dam at Clinton has been 
completed, and the Wachusett reservoir is practically finished, 
and is now filling with water. 

Appendix. 

Appended hereto are tables giving further information and 
details concerning the work of the* department during the year; 
also locations of hydrants and other fixtures connected with the 
water works. 

Feank E. Merrill, 
Water Commissioner. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



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Description of Work. 


Street main; from point 346' south from Broadway to 200' south from south 

line Mallett street. 
Street main; from point near Pearson avenue to 10' east from east line Pritchard 

avenue. 
Street main; from point 137' north from Morrison avenue to point 237' north 

from Morrison avenue. 
Street main; from connection with old main to ponit 264' west from Central 

street. 
Street main; from 269' north from Professors' row to 516' north from soutli line 

Professors' row. 
Gate— 20' north from north line Pearl street. 
Street main; from main in Pearl street to connection with old main 9' west from 

angle of street. 
Street main; from main in Broadway to point 145' north from north line Broad- 
way. 
Street main; from point 92' west from Concord avenue to point 267' west from 

Concord avenue. 
Street main; from connection with main in Frederick avenue to connection witli 

main at south line Boston avenue. 
Street main; from point 12' south from south line Broadway to point 4' north 

from north line Mallett street. 
Hydrants. 
Waterpost. 

Blow-off — 10' east from west line Delaware street. 
Gate -11' east from west line Pearl terrace on hydrant branch. 
Hydrants. 
Street main; from main in Warner street to point 61' north from north line 

Warner street. 


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Cleveland street 

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Dana street 
Delaware street 

Dickson street 


Dimick street 

Highland road 

Lowden avenue 

Ossipee road 
Packard avenue 
Pearl street 
Pearl street 
Pearson avenue 
Pearson road 





368 



AKKUAL REPORTS. 






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Washington sf] 





WATER DEPARTMENT. 



369 





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370 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Hydrants — Construction Account. 

New hydrants have been set in the following locations : — 

Bay State avenue, 7 feet south from Mallett street, 6-inch Mathews. 
Bay State avenue. 39 feet south from Broadway, G-inch Mathews. 
Boston avenue, 11 feet east from Pearson avenue, G-inch Mathews. 
Delaware street, 8 feet south from Pearl street, 6-inch Mathews. 
Highland road, 83 feet south from Frederick avenue, 6-inch Mathews. 
Highland road, 175 feet north from Frederick avenue, 6-inch Mathews. 
Highland road, 221 feet south from Boston avenue, 6-inch Corey. 
Ossipee road, 177 feet east from Curtis street, 6-inch Holyoke. 
Ossipee road, 139 feet west from Packard avenue, 6-inch Holyoke. 
Pearson avenue, 44 feet south from Frederick avenue, 6-inch Holyoke. 
Pearson avenue, 308 feet north from Frederick avenue, 6-inch Holyoke. 
Pritchard avenue, 46 feet north from Frederick avenue, 6-inch Holyoke. 
Pritchard avenue, l(i8 feet south from Boston avenue, 6-inch Holyoke. 
Russell road, 312 feet north from' Broadway, 6-inch Corey. 
Washington street, 15 feet east from Perry street, 6-inch Holyoke. 

Hydrants — Renewal Account. 

The following changes have been made in the kind and loca- 
tion of hydrants : — 

Arthur street, 6-inch Mathews hydrant, set 29 feet south from Broadway, 
and 6-inch Holyoke hydrant removed from same location. 

Cottage avenue, G-inch Holyoke hydrant, set 206 feet west from Russell 
street, and G-inch Chapman hydrant removed from same location. 

Dana street. 6-inch Chapman hydrant, set 18 feet north from Pearl street, 
and 6-inch Chapman hydrant removed from Pearl street, 30 feet west 
from Dana street. 

Main street, 6-inch Holyoke hydrant, set 5 feet west from Moreland 
street, and G-inch Holyoke hydrant removed from west corner of 
Moreland street. 

Oak street, 6- inch Pratt & Cady hydrant, set 315 feet north from Hough- 
ton street, and 6-inch Chapman hydrant removed from same location. 

Pearl street, 6-inch Mathews hj^drant, set 3 feet east from Pearl terrace, 
and 6-inch Mathews hydrant removed from 15 feet east from Dela- 
ware street. 

Webster avenue, 6-inch Holyoke hydrant, set 25 feet north from Newton 
street, and 6-inch Pratt & Cady hydrant removed from same location. 

Wigglesworth street, 6-inch Mathews hydrant, set 14 feet north from 
Pearl street, and 4-inch Holyoke hydrant removed from Pearl street, 
1 foot west from Wigglesworth street. 



Hydrants — Recapitulation. 

Number of public hydrants set in 1905 
private 

Total number of hydrants set in 1905 

Number of hydrants removed in 1905 

Net increase in number of public hydrants, 1905 
u <. u pi-i^.^^te 

Total net increase in number of hydrants, 1905 
Total number of public hydrants in the city . 
" " " private hydrants . . . . 



28 

9 



8 



15 



1.001 
49 



Total number of all hydrants in the city December 31, 1905 . 1,050 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 371 

Locations of Hydrants. 

Adams street, 1] feet south from Broadway. 

Adams street, 221 feet south from Broadway. 

Adams street, 266 feet north from Medford street. 

Adams street, 10 feet north from Medford street. 

Adrian street, 93 feet east from Marion street. 

Adrian street, 220 feet south from Joseph street. 

Allen street, 9 feet north from Charlestown street. 

Allen street, 45 feet west from Somerville avenue. 

Allen street, 323 feet west from Somerville avenue. 

Albion street, 396 feet west from Central street. 

Albion street, 15 feet west from Centre street. 

Albion street, 217 feet east from Lowell street. 

Albion street, 7 feet west from 110 Albion street. 

Albion street. 444 feet east from Cedar street. 

Aldersey street, 276 feet west from Walnut street. 

Alpine street, 280 feet east from Cedar street. 

Alpine street, 76 feet west from Princeton street. 

Alpine street, 298 feet west from Lowell street. 

Alston street, 212 feet east from Cross street. 

Alston street, 10 feet west from Shawmut place. 

Ames street, 123 feet west from Central street. 

Appleton street, 3 feet east from Clifton street. 

Appleton street, 41 feet west from Willow avenue. 

Arlington street, 36 feet east from Hathorn street. 

Arthur street, 29 feet south from Broadway. 

Ash avenue, 300 feet north from Meacham street. 

Ashland street, 268 feet south from Summer street. 

Auburn avenue, 239 feet west from Cross street. 

Auburn avenue, 481 feet west from Cross street. 

Austin street, 81 feet south from Mystic avenue. 

Austin street, Q(S feet north from Benedict street. 

Austin street, 2 feet north from Broadway. 

Avon street, 233 feet east from Central street. 

Avon street, 572 feet west from School street. 

Avon street. 270 feet west from School street. 

Banks street, 310 feet south from Summer street. 

Bartlett street (Ward 1), 130 feet south from Washington street. 

Bartlett street (Ward 5), 230 feet south from Broadway. 

Bartlett street (Ward 5), 223 feet north from Medford street. 

Bartlett street (Ward 5), 15 feet south from Ames street. 

Bartlett street (Ward 5), 10 feet south from Robinson street. 

Bay State avenue, 7 feet south from Mallett street. 

Bay State avenue. 39 feet south from Broadway. 

Beacon street, 316 feet west from Greenwood terrace. 

Beacon street, 10 feet east from Stanford terrace. 

Beacon street, 46 feet west from Sacramento street. 

Beacon street, south side Beacon street, 40 feet east from Sacramento 

street. 
Beacon street, south side Beacon street, 2 feet west from Beckwith circle. 
Beacon street, 15 feet west from Kent street. 
Beacon street, 4 feet west from Ivaloo street. 
Beacon street, 68 feet east from Park street. 
Beacon street, 18 feet east from Durham street. 
Beacon street, 26 feet east from Washington street. 
Beacon street, 90 feet east from Calvin street. 
Beacon street, 194 feet east from Calvin street. 
Beacon street, 28 feet west from Buckingham street. 
Beacon street, 208 feet east from Buckingham street. 
Beacon street, 6 feet east from Concord avenue. 



372 ANNUAL EEPOKTS. 

Beech street, 4 feet south from Atherton street. 

Beech street, 31 feet east from Spring street. 

Belmont street, 206 feet north from Spring Hill terrace. 

Belmont street, 241 feet north from Summer street. 

Belmont street, 243 feet south from Summer street. 

Belmont street, 10 feet north from Belmont place. 

Belmont street, 222 feet south from Belmont place. 

Belmont street, 185 feet north from Somerville avenue. 

Benedict street, 33 feet east from Mystic street. 

Bennett street, 166 feet east from Prospect street. 

Benton road, 2 feet north from Cambria street. 

Benton road, 28 feet south from Highland avenue. 

Berkeley street, 8 feet east from Central street. 

Berkeley street, 150 feet east from Hersey street. 

Berkeley street, 28 feet west from School street. 

Berkeley street, 212 feet west from Hersey street. 

Billingham street, 126 feet north from William street. 

Bolton street, 203 feet north from Houghton street. 

Bolton street, 3 feet south from Oak street. 

Bonair street, 26 feet west from Cross street. 

Bonair street, 90 feet east from Autumn street. . 

Bonair street, 121 feet east from Arthur street. 

Bonair street, 67 feet east from Dana street. 

Bonair street, opposite Melvin street. 

Bonair street, 117 feet east from Walnut street. 

Bond street, 63 feet south from Jaques street. 

Bonner avenue, 171 feet north from Washington street. 

Boston avenue, 110 feet south from bridge over Mystic river. 

Boston avenue, 492 feet north from Gove street. 

Boston avenue, 65 feet north from Highland road. 

Boston avenue, H feet east from Pearson avenue. 

Boston street, 11 feet west from Prospect Hill avenue. 

Boston street, 207 feet west from Bigelow street. 

Boston street, 87 feet east from Bigelow street. 

Boston street, 6 feet north from Munroe street. 

Bow street, 102 feet north from Warren avenue. 

Bow street, 23 feet west from Wesley park. 

Bow street, 25 feet east from Bow-street place. 

Bow street, 74 feet north from Walnut street. 

Bow-street place, 193 feet west from Bow street. 

Bowdoin street, 65 feet north from Fremont avenue, 

Bradley street, 26 feet south from Veazie street. 

Brastow avenue, 202 feet east from Porter street. 

Brastow avenue, 115 feet west from Lowell street. 

Broadway, 50 feet east from Mt. Pleasant street. 

Broadway, 20 feet west from George street. 

Broadway, 21 feet west from Broadway place. 

Broadway, 83 feet east from Cutter street. 

Broadway, 7 feet east from Glen street. 

Broadway, 21 feet east from Rush street. 

Broadway, 15 feet west from Cross street. 

Broadway, 7 feet west from Autumn street. 

Broadway, 6 feet west from Montgomery avenue. 

Broadway, 33 feet west from Walnut street. 

Broadway, 4 feet east from Sargent avenue. 

Broadway, 3 feet west from Melvin street. 

Broadway, 157 feet west from Grant street. 

Broadway, 117 feet east from Marshall street. 

Broadway, 62 feet west from Marshall street. 

Broadway, 4 feet west from School street. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 373 



Broadway, 10 feet west from Thurston street. 
Broadway, 209 feet east from Central street. 
Broadway, 104 feet west from Norwood avenue. 
Broadway, 288 feet east from Cedar street. 
Broadway, opposite Cedar street. 
Broadway, 5 feet east from Wilson avenue. 
Broadway, 252 feet west from Wilson avenue. 
Broadway, 115 feet west from Rogers avenue. 
Broadway, 236 feet west from Liberty avenue. 
Broadway, 175 feet west from College avenue. 
Broadway, 6 feet west from Billingham street. 
Broadway, 9 feet west from Packard avenue. 
Broadway, 32 feet east from Westminster street. 
Broadway, 237 feet east from Endicott avenue. 
Broadway, 6 feet west from Endicott avenue. 
Broadway, 9 feet west from Garrison avenue. 
Broadway. 330 feet west from Waterhouse street. 
Broadway park, near the pond. 
Brook street, 18 feet v/est from Rush street. 
Browning road, 302 feet west from Sycamore street. 
Browning road, 186 feet east from Central street. 
Buckingham street, 2 feet south from Dimick street. 
Burnside avenue, 259 feet north from Elm street. 
Burnside avenue, 120 feet south from Summer street. 
Calvin street, 186 feet south from Beacon street. 
Cambria street, 131 feet west from Central street. 
Cameron avenue, 166 feet south from Holland street. 
Cameron avenue, opposite Mead street. 
Cameron avenue, 26 feet south from Glendale avenue. 
Campbell park, 258 feet west from Meacham road. 
Cedar street, 226 feet south from Sartwell avenue. 
Cedar street, 98 feet north from Sartwell avenue. 
Cedar street, 61 feet north from Hall street. 
Cedar street, 22 feet south from Highland avenue. 
Cedar street, 12 feet north from Highland avenue. 
Cedar street, 10 feet north from Albion street. 
Cedar street, 124 feet south from Warwick street. 
Cedar street, 50 feet north from Clyde street. 
Cedar street, 24 feet south from Murdock street. 
Cedar street, 270 feet south from Broadway. 
Central street, 50 feet south from Broadway. 
Central street, 6 feet north from Forster street. 
Central street, 5 feet north from Pembroke street. 
Central street, 187 feet south from Vernon street. 
Central street, 9 feet north from Willoughby street. 
Central street, 92 feet north from Highland avenue. 
Central street, 9 feet south from Highland avenue. 
Central street, 6 feet north from Oxford street. 
Central street, 23 feet south from Avon street. 
Central street, 14 feet south from Summer street. 
Chandler street, 16 feet south from Broadway. 
Chandler street, 206 feet north from Park avenue. 
Chapel street, 14 feet east from Chandler street. 
Charles street, 183 feet south from Washington street. 
Charnwood road, 79 feet west from H^ancock street. 
Cherry street, 7 feet south from Sartwell avenue. 
Cherry street, 254 feet north from Sartwell avenue. 
Cherry street, 252 feet north from Summer street. 
Cherry street, 26 feet south from Highland avenue. 
Chester street, 15 feet north from Chester place. 



374 ANNUAL EEPORTS. 

Chestnut street, 480 feet south from Poplar street. 
Chestnut street, 24G feet south from Poplar street. 
Church street, 9 feet south from Summer street. 
Church street, 800 feet south from Summer street. 
Church street, 16 feet south from Somerville avenue. 
Church street, 29 feet north from Somerville avenue. 
Church street, 12 feet north from Lake street. 
Claremon street, 255 feet south from Holland street. 
Clarendon avenue, 253 feet south from Broadway. 
Clarendon avenue, opposite house No. 66. 
Clarendon avenue, near Cambridge line. 
Clark street, 200 feet west from Newton street. 
Clark street, 412 feet west from Newton street. 
Cleveland street, 192 feet west from Central street. 
Clyde street, 250 feet east from Cedar street. 
Clyde street, opposite Murdock street. 
Columbia street, 3 feet south from Beach avenue. 
Columbia street, 8 feet south from Columbia court. 
College avenue, 12 feet north from Winter street. 
College avenue, 6 feet south from Morrison avenue. 
College avenue, 8 feet south from Hall avenue. 
College avenue, 53 feet west from Francesca avenue. 
College avenue, opposite Kenwood street. 
College avenue, 100 feet west from Broadway. 
College avenue, 405 feet north from Broadway. 
College avenue, 720 feet north from Broadway. 
Columbus avenue, 7 feet north from Washington street. 
Columbus avenue, 150 feet east from Bonner avenue. 
^Jolumbus avenue, 118 feet west from Bonner avenue. 
Columbus avenue, 35 feet west from Stone avenue. 
Columbus avenue, 8 feet east from Walnut street. 
Concord avenue, 154 feet west from Prospect street. 
Concord avenue, 76 feet east from Concord square. 
Concord avenue, on east line of Knapp school. 
Concord avenue, 313 feet east from Springfield street. 
Concord avenue, 24 feet east from Springfield street. 
Concord avenue, 7 feet east from Marion street. 
Concord avenue, 6 feet south from Hammond street. 
Concord avenue, 20 feet east from Wyatt street. 
Conwell avenue, 20 feet west from Curtis street. 
Conwell avenue, 460 feet west from Curtis street. 
Conwell street, 6 feet south from Highland avenue. 
Conwell street, 3 feet north from Francis street. 
Cooney street, 98 feet north from Line street. 
Cottage avenue, 206 feet west from Russell street. 
Craigie street, 216 feet south from Summer street. 
Craigie street, 232 feet north from Kimball street. 
Craigie street, 77 feet south from Kimball street. 
Craigie street, 126 feet north from Somerville avenue. 
Crescent street, 80 feet south from Hadley place. 
Crocker street, 4 feet south from Highland avenue. 
Crocker street, 8 feet north from Crown street. 
Cross street, 6 feet north from Pearl street. 
"Cross street, 32 feet north from Cross-street place. 
Cross street, 62 feet north from Flint street. 
Cross street, 16 feet north from Oilman street. 
Cross street, 13 feet south from Auburn avenue. 
Cross street, 39 feet north from Alston street. 
Curtis avenue, 206 feet west from Curtis street. 
Curtis street, 6 feet north from Broadway. 
Curtis street, 3 feet south from Electric avenue. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 375 

Curtis street, 137 feet north from Ware street. 
Curtis street, 3 feet south from Raymond avenue. 

Curtis street, 34 feet south from Professors row. 

Curtis street, 225 feet north from Professors row. 

Cutter avenue, 11 feet south from Highland avenue. ,. ._, .. 

Cutter square, 95 feet west from Cutter avenue. 

Cutter street, 95 feet south from Broadway. 

Cutter street, 444 feet south from Broadway. 

Dana street, 18 feet north from Pearl street. 

Dane avenue, 162 feet west from Leland street. 

Dane avenue, 169 feet east from Dane street. 

Dane street, 9 feet north from Tyler street. 

Dane street, 260 feet south from Skehan street. 

Dane street, 55 feet north from Skehan street. 

Dartmouth street, 184 feet south from Broadway. 

Dartmouth street, 200 feet north from Evergreen avenue. 

Dartmouth street, 53 feet south from Evergreen avenue, 

Dartmouth street, 171 feet north from Medford street. 

Davis square, 45 feet east from Day street. 

Day street, 10 feet south from Davis square. 

Day street, opposite Herbert street. 

Day street, 195 feet south from Herbert street. 

Day street, 4 feet north from Orchard street. 

Dell street, 255 feet west from Glen street. 

Delaware street, 246 feet east from Aldrich street. 

Delaware street. 8 feet south from Pearl street. 

Derby street, 400 feet east from Temple street. 

Dickinson street, 20 feet east from Beacon street. 

Dickinson street, 7 feet north from Leon street. 

Dover street, 22 feet south from Davis square. 

Dover street, 203 feet south from Davis square. 

Dover street, 312 feet north from Orchard street. 

Dover street, 3 feet north from Orchard street. 

Durham street, opposite Skehan street. 

Durham street, 5 feet west from Hanson street. 

Earle street, 4 feet east from Ward street. 

Eastman place, 279 feet south from Highland avenue. 

Edmands street, 15 feet south from Broadway. 

Ellsworth street, 7 feet west from Rush street. 

Elm street, 59 feet west from Craigie street. 

Elm street, 17 feet west from Porter street. 

Elm street, 28 feet east from Linden avenue. 

Elm street, 11 feet east from Mossland street. 

Elm street, 9 feet west from Cedar street. 

Elm street, 153 feet east from Cherry street. 

Elm street, 110 feet west from Cherry street. 

Elm street, 14 feet east from Burnside avenue. 

Elm street, 104 feet east from Willow avenue. 

Elm street, 20 feet east from St. James avenue. 

Elm street, 9 feet west from Elston street. 

Elm street, 90 feet west from Windom street. 

Elm street, 30 feet west from Russell street. 

Elm street, 11 feet west from Grove street. 

Elm street, 82 feet west from Chester street. 

Elmwood street, 9 feet south from Holland' street. 

Elmwood street, 300 feet east from' Harrison street. 

Elmwood street, 85 feet west from Harrison street.* 

Eliot street, 3 feet east from Park street. 

Endicott avenue, 422 feet south from Broadway. 

Evergreen avenue, 8 feet east from School street. 



376 ANNUAL EEPORTS. 

Evergreen avenue, 114 feet east from Sycamore street. 
Everett avenue, 5 feet west from Cross street. 
Everett avenue, 9 feet east from Dana street. 
Everett avenue, 449 feet west from Cross street. 
Everett street, opposite Emerson street. 
Fairlee street, 134 feet west from Cherry street. 
Fairmount avenue, 280, feet west from Curtis street. 
Fairmount avenue^ opposite Watson street. 
Farm lane, 70 feet north from Sumner street. 
Farm lane, 67 feet south from Roberts street. 
Farragut avenue, 258 feet south from Broadway. 
Farragut avenue, 537 feet south from Broadway. 
Fellsway East, 7 feet north from Broadway. 
Fellsway West, 11 feet north from Broadway. 
Fellsway West, ^37 feet south from Mystic avenue. 
Fenwick street, 40 feet north from Broadway. 
Fiske avenue, 120 feet east from Hinckley street. 
Fitchburg street, 395 feet east from Linwood street. 
Flint street, 18 feet east from Flint avenue. 
Flint street, 59 feet east from Cross street. 
Flint street, 30 feet west from Franklin street. 
Florence street, 206 feet south from Perkins street. 
Florence street, 7 feet south from Pearl street. 
Florence street, 453 feet north from Washington street. 
Forster street, opposite Tennyson street, 
Fosket street, 6 feet west from Bay State avenue. 
Francesca avenue, 305 feet east from College avenue. 
Francesca avenue, 7 feet west from Liberty avenue. 
Franklin street, 14 feet north from Arlington street. 
Franklin street, 55 feet north from Perkins street. 
Franklin street, 76 feet south from Webster street. 
Franklin street, 156 feet south from Pearl street. 
Franklin street, 80 feet south from Oliver street. 
Franklin street, 87 feet south from Palmer avenue. 
Franklin street, 29 feet north from Washington street. 
Fremont street, 82 feet north from Main street. 
Fremont street, 343 feet north from Main street. 
Fremont street, opposite Meacham street. 
Fremont street, 287 feet north from Meacham street. 
Fremont street, 25 feet north from East Albion street. 
Frost avenue, 75 feet east from Sherman street. 
Fountain avenue, 280 feet west from Glen street. 
Garden court, 357 feet south from Somerville avenue. 
Garfield avenue, 7 feet north from Broadway. 
Garfield avenue, 24 feet south from Mystic avenue. 
Garrison avenue, 235 feet south from Broadway. 
Gibbens street, 202 feet west from Central street. 
Gibbens street, 129 feet west from Benton road. 
Gilman square, opposite Marshall street. 
Gilman street, 103 feet east from Walnut street. 
Gilman street, 143 feet east from Jasper street. 
Gilman street, 8 feet west from Aldrich street. 
Gilman street, 176 feet east from Aldrich street. 
Gilman street, 295 feet west from Cross street. 
Glass-house court, 360 feet ^vest from Water street. 
Glen street, 147 feet south from Broadway. 
Glen street, 8 feet north from Brook street. 
Glen street, 6 feet north from Webster street. 
Glen street, 1 foot north from Flint street. 
Glen street, 11 feet north from Fountain avenue. 
Glendale avenue, 80 feet west from Cameron avenue. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 377 

Glendale avenue, 8 feet east from Yorktown street. 

Glenwood road, 224 feet south from Broadway. 

Glenwood road, 16 feet north from Vernon street. 

Glenwood road, 320 feet north from Vernon street. 

Glenwood road, 467 feet north from Vernon street. 

Gorham street, 310 feet south from Holland street. 

Gorham street, 67 feet north from Howard street. 

Grand View avenue, 286 feet east from Vinal avenue. 

Granite street, 178 feet north from Somerville avenue. 

Grant street, 2 feet north from Derby street. 

Greene street, 295 feet south from Summer street. 

Greenville street, 148 feet north from Boston street. 

Greenville street, 33 feet north from Munroe street. 

Grove street, 163 feet south from Highland avenue. 

Hall avenue, 310 feet east from College avenue. 

Hall avenue, 306 feet west from Liberty avenue. 

Hall avenue, 9 feet west from Liberty avenue. 

Hall street, 269 feet west from Cedar street. 

Hamlet street, 321 feet south from Highland avenue. 

Hammond street. 30 feet west from Dickinson street. 

Hancock street, 258 feet south from Summer street. 

Hanson street, 12 feet south from Village street. 

Hanson street, 9 feet south from Nevada avenue. 

Hanson street, 6 feet south from Skehan street. 

Harvard street, 13 feet north from Beech street. 

Harvard street, 23 feet north from Harvard place. 

Harrison street, 77 feet east from Kent street. 

Harrison street (Ward 7), 4 feet east from Elmwood street. 

Hathorn street, 145 feet south from Broadway. 

Hawkins street, 50 feet north from Lake street. 

Hawthorne street, 8 feet east from Cutter avenue. 

Hawthorne street, 209 feet east from West street. 

Heath street, 3 feet west from Temple street. 

Heath street, 308 feet west from West street. 

Heath street, 100 feet west from Bond street. 

Heath street, 4 feet east from Fenwick street. 

Heath street, 5 feet east from Moreland street. 

Henderson street, 107 feet north from Wilton street. 

Herbert street, 163 feet west from Chester street. 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

U 



ghland avenue, 28 feet west from Hamlet street, 
ghland avenue, 5 feet east from Walnut street, 
ghland avenue, 262 feet west from Walnut street, 
ghland avenue, 80 feet east from Vinal avenue, 
ghland avenue, 41 feet west from Putnam street, 
ghland avenue, 75 feet west from Prescott street, 
ghland avenue, 114 feet west from School street, 
ghland avenue, 410 feet west from School street, 
ghland avenue, 112 feet west from Trull lane, 
ghland avenue, 171 feet east from Central street, 
ghland avenue, 214 feet east from Spring Hill terrace, 
ghland avenue, 23 feet west from Spring Hill terrace, 
ghland avenue, 20 feet west from Belniont street, 
ghland avenue, 4 feet east from Tower street, 
ghland avenue, 2 feet east from Porter street, 
ghland avenue. 212 feet east from Cedar street, 
ghland avenue, 63 feet east from Cherry street, 
ghland avenue, 35 feet east from Hancock street, 
ghland avenue, 4 feet west from Hancock street, 
ghland avenue, 44 feet east from Willow avenue, 
ghland avenue. 3 feet west from Willow avenue, 
ghland avenue, 59 feet east from West street. 



378 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Highland avenue, 36 feet west from West street. 
Highland avenue, 36 feet east from Grove street. 
Highland avenue, 6 feet west from Grove street. 
Highland avenue, 218 feet west from Grove street. 
Highland avenue, 64 feet east from Davis square. 
Highland road, 264 feet north from Morrison avenue. 
Highland road, 83 feet south from Frederick avenue. 
Highland road, 175 feet north from Frederick avenue. 
Highland road, 221 feet south from Boston avenue. 
Hinckley street, 106 feet south from Broadway. 
Holland street, 39 feet west from Dover street. 
Holland street, 8 feet west from B. & M. R. R. crossing. 
Holland street, 23 feet south from Winter street. 
Holland street, 5 feet east from Jay street. 
Holland street, 3 feet east from Paulina street. 
Holland street, 94 feet east from Claremon street. 
Holyoke road (E.), 167 feet south from Elm street. 
Holyoke road (W.), 185 feet south from Elm street. 
Homer square, 200 feet west from Bonner avenue. 
Houghton street, 82 feet west from Prospect street. 
Houghton street, 3 feet west from Bolton street. 
Houghton street, 10 feet west from Oak street. 
Howard street, 36 feet west from Thorndike street. 
Howe street, 162 feet east from School street. 
Hudson street, 12 feet east from Waldo street. 
Hudson street, opposite Benton road. 
Pludson street, 294 feet east from Lowell street. 
Hudson street, 362 feet west from Lowell street. 
Hudson street, 675 feet west from Lowell street. 
Hudson street, 364 feet east from Cedar street. 
Hudson street, 24 feet east from Cedar street. 
Ibbetson street, 256 feet north from Somerville avenue. 
Ibbetson street, 6 feet south from Kimball street. 
Irving street, 6 feet south from Broadway. 
Irving street, 285 feet south from Broadway. 
Irving street, 542 feet north from Holland street. 
Irving street, 190 feet north from Holland street. 
James street, 100 feet north from Pearl street. 
Jaques street, 10 feet west from Fellsway West. 
Jaques street, 8 feet west from Grant street. 
Jaques street, 360 feet east from Temple street. 
Jaques street, 185 feet west from Temple street. 
Jaques street, 410 feet east from Bond street. 
Jasper street, 5 feet south from Virginia street. 
Jay street, 82 feet north from Howard street. 
Joseph street, 100 feet west from Adrian street. 
Josephine avenue, 397 feet north from Morrison avenue. 
Josephine avenue, 90 feet south from Frederick avenue. 
Josephine avenue, 129 feet north from Frederick avenue. 
Josephine avenue, 425 feet north from Frederick avenue. 
Josephine avenue, 213 feet south from Broadway. 
Joy street, 34 feet south from Washington street. 
Joy street, 502 feet south from Washington street. 
Joy street, 271 feet north from Poplar street. 
Kensington avenue. 6 feet north from Broadway. 
Kent court, 205 feet west from Kent street. 
Kent street, 38 feet south from Somerville avenue. 
Kidder avenue, 346 feet east from College avenue. 
Kingman court, 282 feet south from Washington street. 
Kingston street, 95 feet west from Thorndike street. 
Knocvlton street, opposite Morton street. 



WATEK DEPARTMENT. 379 



Lake street, 220 feet west from Hawkins street. 
Lake street, 4 feet east from Carlton street. 
Laurel street, 50 feet north from Greene street. 
Laurel street, 8 feet north from Park place, 
Lawrence street, 9 feet south from Richardson street. 
Leland street, 14 feet south from Dane avenue. 
Lexington avenue, 3 feet west from Hancock street. 
Lexington avenue, 4 feet east of Henry avenue. 
Liberty avenue, 3 feet north from Kidder avenue. 
Liberty avenue, 12 feet north from Mallett street. 
Lincoln avenue, 206 feet west from Mt. Vernon street. 
Lincoln parkway, 150 feet west from Joseph street. 
Lincoln parkway, 290 feet east from Wyatt street. 
Lincoln street, 38 feet south from Broadway. 
Lincoln street, 174 feet north from Perkins street. 
Linden avenue, 118 feet soutli from Gilson terrace. 
Linden avenue, 255 feet south from Olive avenue. 
Linden avenue, 30 feet north from Olive avenue. 
Linden street, 31 feet nortli from Charlestown street. 
Linden street. 237 feet south from Somerville avenue. 
Line street, 272 feet west from Cooney street. 
Line street, 100 feet west from Smith avenue. 
Linwood street, 385 feet south from Washington street. 
Linwood street, 12 feet north from Linwood terrace. 
Linwood street, 48 feet south from Lamson court. 
Linwood street, 125 feet north from London street. 
Linwood street, 52 feet south from London street. 
Linwood street, 2 feet south from Linwood place. 
London street, 383 feet east from Linwood street. 
Lorihg street, 276 feet north from Somerville avenue. 
Lovell street, 41 feet south from Electric avenue. 
Lowell street, 1 foot north from Fiske avenue. 
Lowell street, 50 feet north from Richardson street. 
Lowell street, 183 feet south from Richardson street. 
Lowell street, 124 feet south from Wilton street. 
Lowell street, opposite Vernon street. 
Lowell street, 3 feet south from Princeton street. 
Lowell street, 163 feet south from Highland avenue. 
Lowell street, 53 feet north from Crown street. 
Lowell street. 351 feet south from Summer street. 
Lowell street, 16 feet north from Kimball street. 
Madison street, 103 feet west from School street. 
Madison street, 467 feet west from School street. 
Main street, junction with Broadway. 
Main street, 112 feet west from Mt. Vernon avenue. 
Main street, 5 feet west from Moreland street. 
Malloy court, 16 feet south from Somerville avenue. 
Mansfield street, 190 feet north from Somerville avenue. 
Mansfield street, 189 feet south from Washington street. 
Maple avenue, 294 feet east from School street. 
Maple street, 7 feet south from Jackson street. 
Maple street, 87 feet north from Poplar street. 
Marion street, 31 feet south from Adrian street. 
Marion street, 74 feet north from Wyatt street. 
Marshall street, 80 feet south from Stickney avenue. 
Marshall street, 30 feet north from Stickney avenue. 
Marshall street, opposite Howe street. 
Marshall street, 5 feet north from Evergreen avenue. 
Marshall street, 104 feet south from Mortimer place. 
Marshall street, 109 feet north from Oakland avenue. 
Meacham ro^d, 4 feet north from Orchard street. 



380 ANNUAL KEPORTS. 

Meacham road, 97 feet north from Kingston street. 
Meacham street, 14 feet west from Moreland street. 
Mead street, 48 feet east from Claremon street. 
Medford street, 50 feet north from Hennessey court. 
Medford street, 56 feet north from Lowell street. 
Medford street, 14 feet north from Glenwood road. 
Medford street, 16 feet south from Bartlett street. 
Medford street, 6 feet north from Central street. 
Medford street, 19 feet south from Sycamore street. 
Medford street, 15 feet south from Lee street. 
Medford street, 46 feet south from Thurston street. 
Medford street, 31 feet south from Dartmouth street. 
Medford street, 5 feet north from School street. 
Medford street, 171 feet north from Marshall street. 
Medford street, 266 feet north from Walnut street. 
Medford street, 17 feet south from Walnut street. 
Medford street, 291 feet south from Walnut street. 
Medford street, 8 feet south from Greenville street. 
Medford street, 13 feet north from Prospect Hill avenue. 
Medford street, 240 feet south from Prospect Hill avenue. 
Medford street, opposite Chester avenue. 
Medford street, 216 feet south from Washington street. 
Medford street, 69 feet north from Jackson street. 
Medford street, 21 feet north from Somerville avenue. 
Medford street, 382 feet south from Somerville avenue. 
Medford street, 220 feet north from Ward street. 
Medford street, 55 feet north from Ward street. 
Medford street, 91 feet south from Ward street. 
Medford street, 46 feet south from South street. 
Medford street, 17 feet south from Warren street. 
Medford street, 220 feet south from Warren street. 
Melrose street, 610 feet north from Mystic avenue. 
Merriam street, 25 feet north from Charlestown street. 
Miller street, 300 feet west from Sacramento street. 
Miner street, 137 feet north from Vernon street. 
Mondamin court, 272 feet west from Ivaloo street. 
Monmouth street, 7 feet west from Central street. 
Monmouth street, 156 feet east from Harvard street. 
Montrose street, 10 feet east from Sycamore street. 
Montrose street, 287 feet east from Sycamore street. 
Montrose street, 259 feet west from School street. 
Moore street, 22 feet south from Holland street. 
Moore street, 335 feet south from Holland street. 
Moore street, 21 feet north from Mead street. 
Moreland street, 345 feet north from Meacham street. 
Moreland street, 2 feet south from East Albion street. 
Morgan street, 125 feet west from Park street. 
Morrison avenue, 124 feet west from Cedar street. 
Morrison avenue, 44 feet east from Pearson avenue. 
Morrison avenue, 124 feet east from Rogers avenue. 
Morrison avenue, 13 feet west from Newberne street. 
Morrison avenue, 183 feet west from Clifton street. 
Morrison avenue, 33 feet west from Grove street. 
Mossland street, 114 feet north from Somerville avenue. 
Mt. Pleasant street, 140 feet south from Broadway. 
Mt. Pleasant street, 135 feet north from Perkins street. 
Mt. Vernon avenue, 156 feet north from Heath street. 
Mt. Vernon avenue, 38 feet south from Heath street. 
Mt. Vernon street, 246 feet north from Washington street. 
Mt. Vernon street, 8 feet north from Pearl street. 
Mt. Vernon street, 7 feet south from Perkins street 



WATER DEPARTMENT. ' 08 1 

Mt. Vernon street, 11 feet south from Lincoln avenue. 

Mt. Vernon street, 5 feet south from Broadway. 

Munroe street, 203 feet east from Walnut street. 

Munroe street, 6 feet west from Bigelow street. 

Munroe street, 289 feet west from Boston street. 

Murdock street, 204 feet east from Cedar street. 

Murdock street, 610 feet east from Cedar street. 

Museum street, 174 feet west from Beacon street. 

Myrtle street, 218 feet north from Washington street. 

Myrtle street, 460 feet north from Washington street. 

Myrtle street, 74 feet south from Pearl street. 

Myrtle street, 219 feet north from Pearl street. 

Mystic avenue, 90 feet east from Union street. 

Mystic avenue, 3 feet west from Union street. 

Mystic avenue, 438 feet east from Austin street. 

Mystic avenue, 11 feet west from Fellsway West. 

Mystic avenue, 60 feet west from Temple street. 

Mystic avenue, 25 feet east from Melrose street. 

Mystic avenue, 800 feet east from Moreland street. 

Mystic avenue, 544 feet east from Moreland street. 

Mystic avenue, 241 feet east from Moreland street. 

Mystic street (Ward 1), 148 feet north from Benedict street. 

Mystic street (Ward 2), 160 feet south from Washington street. 

Nashua street, 190 feet south from Wilton street. 

Newbury street, 15 feet south from Holland street. 

Newbury street, 260 feet south from Holland street. 

Newbury street, 558 feet south from Holland street 

Newbury street, 777 feet south from Holland street 

Newbury street, 200 feet north from Cambridge line 

New Cross street, 114 feet north from Broadway. 

Newton street, 9 feet west from Joseph street. 

Newton street, 9 feet east from Clark street. 

Norfolk street, 27 feet south from Webster avenue. 

Norfolk street, 227 feet south from Webster avenue. 

North street, 18 feet north from Broadway. 

North street, 13 feet north from south line of Russell road. 

North street, 453 feet north from Raymond avenue. 

North street, 190 feet north from city bound No. 17. 

North Union street, 287 feet north from Mystic avenue. 

Oak street, 8 feet west from Prospect street. 

Oak street, 315 feet north from Houghton street. 

Oakland avenue, 109 feet west from Marshall street. 

Oliver street, 191 feet east from Cross street. 

Oliver street, 15 feet east from Glen street. 

Oliver street, 7 feet west from Franklin street. 

Orchard street, 8 feet west from Russell street. 

Orchard street, west corner Milton street. 

Orchard street, 9 feet east from Chester street. 

Ossipee road, 177 feet east from Curtis street. 

Ossipee road, 139 feet west from Packard avenue, 

Otis street, 12 feet west from Cross street, 

Otis street, 440 feet west from Cross street. 

Otis street, 9 feet east from Dana street. 

Otis street, 6 feet east from Wigglesworth street. 

Oxford street, 280 feet west from School street. 

Oxford street, 46 feet east from Trull lane. 

Oxford street. 237 feet west from Hersey street. 

Park avenue, 83 feet west from College avenue. 

Park avenue, 10 feet west from Chandler street. 

Park street, opposite Allen court. 



383 AXXUAL EEi>OETS. 

Park street, 187 feet north from Beacon street. 

Park street, 69 feet south from Somerville avenue. 

Partridge avenue, 5 feet south from Broadway. 

Partridge avenue, 2(3 feet north iroin Medford street. 

Partridge avenue, 117 feet south from Medford street. 

Partridge avenue. 421 feet south from Medford street. 

Partridge avenue, 27G feet north from Vernon street. 

PauHna street.. 184 feet north from Holland street. 

Paulina street, 288 feet south from Broadway. 

Paulina street. 5 feet south from Broadway. 

Pearl street, 50 feet west from Crescent street. 

Pearl street,. 7 feet north from Pinckney street. 

Pearl street, 29 feet east from Franklin street. 

Pearl street, opposite Hillside avenue. 

Pearl street, 15 feet west from Glen street. 

Pearl street, 90 feet east from Cross street. 

Pearl street, 3 feet east from Pearl terrace. 

Pearl street, 6 feet west from Walnut street. 

Pearl street, 72 feet east from Bradley street. ' 

Pearl street, 110 feet east from Marshall street. 

Pearson avenue, 309 feet north from Morrison avenue. 

Pearson avenue, 44 feet south from Frederick avenue. 

Pearson avenue, 308 feet nortii from Frederick avenue. 

Pearson road, 127 feet north from Broadway. 

Pembroke street, 14 feet east from Tennyson street. 

Perkins street, opposite Myrtle street. 

Perkins street, 78 feet east from Florence street. 

Perkins street, 24 feet east from Pinckney street. 

Perkins street, 56 feet east from Perkins place. 

Perkins street, 21 feet east from Mt. Pleasant street. 

Perry street, 324 feet south from Washington street. 

Pinckney street, 11 feet north from Washington street. ^ 

Pinckney street, 330 feet south from Pearl street. 

Pinckney street, 71 feet south from Pearl street. 

Pinckney street, 203 feet north from Pearl street. 

Pitman street, 180 feet west from Beech street. 

Pleasant avenue, 256 feet west from Walnut street. 

Poplar street, 21 feet west from Joy street. 

Poplar street, 22 feet east from Linwood street. 

Porter street, 1 foot north from Mountain avenue. 

Porter street, 282 feet south from Summer street. 

Porter street, 24 feet north from Williams court. 

Porter street, 8 feet north from Parker place. 

Powder House boulevard, 191 feet west from Packard avenue. 

Powder House boulevard, 172 feet east from Curtis street. 

Powder House boulevard, 197 feet west from Curtis street. 

Powder House boulevard, 528 feet west from Curtis street. 

Prescott street, 330 feet south from Highland avenue. 

Prescott street, 586 feet south from Highland avenue. 

Prescott street, 257 feet north from Summer street. 

Preston road, 269 feet west from School street. 

Preston road, 166 feet south from Summer street. 

Pritchard avenue, 255 feet north from Morrison avenue. 

Pritchard avenue. 46 feet north from Frederick avenue. 

Pritchard avenue, 168 feet south from Boston avenue. 

Professors row, 39 feet east from College avenue. 

Professors row, 158 feet west from Boston avenue. 

Professors row, 126 feet west from College avenue. 

Professors row, 291 feet west from College avenue. 

Professors row, 548 feet east from Packard avenue. 

Professors row, 156 feet east from Packard avenue. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. ^ 3 



Professors row, 3 feet west from Packard avenue. 
Professors row, 296 feet west from Packard avenue. 
Professors row, 113 feet east from Curtis street. 
Prospect Hill avenue, 10 feet north from Munroe street. 
Prospect street, 135 feet north from Bennett street. 
Prospect street, 35 feet south from Concord avenue. 
Prospect street, 185 feet south from Oak street. 
Prospect street, 403 feet south from Oak street. 
Prospect street, 63 feet north from Houghton street. 
Putnam street, 116 feet south from Highland avenue. 
Putnam street, 420 feet south from Highland avenue. 
Putnam street, 612 feet north from Summer street. 
Putnam street, 308 feet north from Summer street. 
Putnam street, 46 feet north from Summer street. 
Quincy street, 91 feet north from Somerville avenue. 
Quincy street, 381 feet north from Somerville avenue. 
Quincy street, 26 feet south from Summer street. 
Raymond avenue, 728 feet west from Curtis street. 
Richardson street, 11 feet west from Nashua street. 
Richdale avenue, opposite Thurston street. 
Robinson street, 325 feet west from Central street. 
Rogers avenue, 369 feet south from Broadway. 
Rogers avenue, 257 feet north from Frederick avenue. 
Rogers avenue, 88 feet south from Frederick avenue. 
Rogers avenue, 255 feet north from Morrison avenue. 
Rossmore street, 244 feet south from Washington street, 
Rush street, 84 feet south from Pearl street. 
Rush street, H feet north from Pearl street. 
/Rush street, 128 feet north from Brook street. 
Russell road, 11 feet north from Broadway. 
Russell road, 312 feet north from Broadway. 
Sacramento street, 5 feet south from Miller street. 
Sacramento street, 142 feet south from Beacon street. 
Sanborn avenue, 55 feet east from Walnut street. 
Sargent avenue, 474 feet south from Broadway. 
Sargent avenue, 361 feet west from Walnut street. 
Sargent avenue, 95 feet west from Walnut street. 
School street, 31 feet south from Oakland avenue. 
School street, 100 feet south from Maple avenue. 
School street, 6 feet south from Montrose street. 
School street, 128 feet north from Highland avenue. 
School street, 88 feet north from Oxford street. 
School street, 15 feet north from Avon street. 
School street, 100 feet south from Summer street. 
School street, 93 feet south from Preston road. 
School street, 61 feet north from Knapp street. 
Sewall street, 311 feet west from Grant street. 
Shawmut street, 9 feet west from Washington street. 
Shawmut street, 153 feet west from Shawmut place. 
Simpson avenue, 272 feet south from Broadway. 
Simpson avenue, 142 feet north from Holland street. 
Skehan street, 110 feet east from Hanson street. 
Somerville avenue, 188 feet west from Mossland street. 
Somerville avenue, 308 feet east from Mossland street. 
Somerville avenue, 600 feet east from Mossland street. 
Somerville avenue, 116 feet west from Elm street. 
Somerville avenue, 9 feet east from Ibbetson street. 
Somerville avenue, 77 feet east from Belmont street. 
Somerville avenue, 14 feet west from Garden court. 
Somerville avenue, 133 feet west from Kent street. 
Somerville avenue, 13 feet west from Beech street. 



384 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Somerville avenue, 11 feet east from Central street. 
Somerville avenue, 2 feet west from Abdell street. 
Somerville avenue, 15 feet west from Laurel street. 
Somerville avenue, 86 feet west from Granite street. 
Somerville avenue, 38 feet west from Sherman street. 
Somerville avenue, 76 feet east from Hawkins street. 
Somerville avenue, 185 feet west from Hawkins street. 
Somerville avenue, 88 feet west from Quincy street. 
Somerville avenue, 105 feet east from Carlton street. 
Somerville avenue, 90 feet west from Prospect street. 
Somerville avenue, 28 feet west from Linden street. 
Somerville avenue, 9 feet east from Mystic street. 
Somerville avenue, 94 feet west from Mansfield street. 
Somerville avenue, 126 feet east from Medford street. 
Somerville avenue, 88 feet east from Poplar street. 
Somerville avenue, 464 feet east from Poplar street. 
Somerville avenue, 153 feet west from Linwood street. 
Somerville avenue, 20 feet east from F. R. R. crossing. 
Somerville avenue, 368 feet west from Franklin court. 
Somerville avenue, 262 feet west from Franklin court. 
Somerville avenue, 23 feet east from F^ranklin court. 
Somerville avenue, 100 feet west from Cambridge line. 
South street, 97 feet west from Bedford street. 
South street, 2 feet east from Harding street. 
South street, 25 feet west from Hunting street. 
South street, 80 feet west from Willow place. 
Spencer avenue, 290 feet west from Cedar street. 
Spencer avenue, 63 feet east from Hancock street. 
Spring street, 10 feet south from Pitman street. 
Spring street, 184 feet north from Beech street. 
Springfield street, 140 feet south from Concord avenue. 
Springfield street, 21 feet south from Dickinson street. 
Springfield street, 177 feet south from Houghton street. 
Spring Hill terrace, 333 feet south from Highland avenue. 
Stickney avenue, 212 feet west from Marshall street. 
Stone avenue, 120 feet north from Union square. 
Stone avenue, 275 feet south from Columbus avenue. 
Summer street, 148 feet east from Cutter avenue. 
Summer street, opposite Elston street. 
Summer street, west corner Hancock street. 
Summer street, 34 feet east from Banks street. 
Summer street, 6 feet east from Cherry street. 
Summer street, 6 feet east from Cedar street. 
Summer street, 24 feet east from Linden avenue. 
Summer street, opposite Craigie street. 
Summer street, 35 feet east from Porter street. 
Summer street, 4 feet east from Lowell street. 
Summer street, 3 feet east from Belmont street. 
Summer street, 1 foot west from Spring street. 
Summer street, 53 feet west from Harvard street. 
Summer street, 215 feet east from Harvard street. 
Summer street, 59 feet east from Central street. 
Summer street, 19 feet west from Laurel street. 
Summer street, 52 feet west from Preston road. 
Summer street, 191 feet west from School street. 
Summer street, 8 feet east from School street. 
Summit avenue, 231 feet east from Vinal avenue. 
Sunnyside avenue, 99 feet west from Wigglesworth street. 
Sycamore street, 18 feet south from Broadway. 
Sycamore street, 62 feet south from Browning road. 
Sycamore street, 1 foot south from Forster street. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 385 



Sycamore street, 200 feet north from Medford street. 
Sycamore street, 174 feet south from Medford street. 
Sydney street, 418 feet east from Temple street. 
Talbot avenue, 488 feet east from Packard avenue. 
Temple street, 4 feet north from Broadway. 
Temple street, 123 feet south from Sewall street. 
Temple street, 11 feet north from Jaques street. 
Temple street, 6 feet south from Derby street. 
Temple street, 5 feet south from Sydney street. 
Tenney court, 306 feet north from Mystic avenue. 
Tennyson street, 4 feet south from Medford street. 
Tennyson street, 117 feet north from Pembroke street. 
Thorndike street, 4 feet south from Holland street. 
Thorndike street, 82 feet north from Kingston street. 
Thorpe place, 269 feet south from Highland avenue. 
Thurston street, 187 feet north from Medford street. 
Thurston street, 160 feet south from Evergreen avenue. 
Thurston street, 6 feet north from Evergreen avenue. 
Thurston street, 348 feet north from Evergreen avenue. 
Tower street, 18 feet north from Crown street. 
Tremont street, 9 feet south from Webster avenue. 
Tremont street, 454 feet south from Webster avenue. 
Trull street, 3 feet south from Medford street. 
Trull street, 276 feet south from Medford street. 
Trull street, 522 feet north from Vernon street. 
Trull street, 270 feet north from Vernon street. 
Tufts street, 51 feet north from Washington street. 
Tufts street, 150 feet south from Glen street. 
Tufts street, 43 feet north from Glen street. 
Tufts street, 53 feet south from Dell street. 
Tufts street, 45 feet south from Cross street. 
Tyler street, 31 feet east from Vine street. 
Union square, 267 feet east from Webster avenue. 
Union square, 15 feet east from Stone avenue. 
Union square, 3 feet west from Bow street. 
Union square, centre of square. 
Union street, 3 feet north from Broadway. 
Union street, 123 feet south from Mystic avenue. 
Veazie street, 1 foot west from James street. 
Vernon street, 72 feet west from Partridge avenue. 
Vernon street, 1 foot east from Bartlett street. 
Vernon street, 2 feet east from Miner street. 
Victoria street, 255 feet south from Broadway. 
Victoria street, 506 feet south from Broadway. 
Victoria street, 151 feet north from Woodstock street. 
Villa avenue, 121 feet south from Winslow avenue. 
Vinal avenue, 6 feet south from Highland avenue. 
Vinal avenue, 10 feet north from Pleasant avenue. 
Vinal avenue, 129 feet north from Aldersey street. 
Vinal avenue, 206 feet north from Summer street. 
Vinal avenue, 15 feet north from Summer street. 
Vine street, 15 feet north from Beacon street. 
Vine street, opposite Eliot street. 
Vine street, 121 feet south from Tyler street. 
Vine street, 32 feet south from So'merville avenue. 
Virginia street, 45 feet west from Aldrich street. 
Waldo street, 6 feet north from Highland avenue. 
Wallace street, 37 feet south from Broadway. 
Wallace street, 395 feet south from Broadway. 
Wallace street, 483 feet north from Park avenue. 



oS6 ANi^tJAL EEPOETS. 

Wallace street, 166 feet north from Park avenue. 
Wallace street, 10 feet north from Holland street. 
Walnut street, 88 feet south from Wellington avenue. 
Walnut street, opposite Veazie street. 
Walnut street, 87 feet north from Oilman street. 
Walnut street, 31 feet north from Pleasant avenue. 
Walnut street, 12 feet south from Boston street. 
Walter street, 28 feet west from Walnut street. 
Walter street, 50 feet west from Bradley street. 
Ward street, 104 feet west from Medford street. 
Ward street, 3 feet east from Emery street. 
Ware street, 258 feet west from Curtis street. 
Ware street, 638 feet west from Curtis street, 
Warner street, 60 feet north from Broadway. 
Warren avenue, 5 feet north from Sanborn avenue. 
Warren avenue, 48 feet north from Bow street. 
Warren avenue, 7 feet south from Columbus avenue. 
Warwick place, 142 feet north from Warwick street. 
Warwick street, 426 feet east from Cedar street. 
Washington street, 69 feet west from Crescent street. 
W^ashington street, 3 feet west from Waverley street. 
Washington street, west corner Mt. Vernon street. 
Washington street, 3 feet west from Murray street. 
Washington street, 2 feet east from Bartlett street. 
Washington street, 6 feet west from Florence street. 
Washington street, 15 feet west from Myrtle street. 
Washington street, 18 feet east from Franklin avenue. 
Washington street, 160 feet east from Franklin street. 
Washington street, 50 feet east from Shawmut street. 
Washington street, 37 feet east from Rossmore street. 
Washington street, 78 feet east from Boston street. 
Washington street. 28 feet west from Mystic street. 
Washington street, 6 feet west from Clark place. 
Washington street, 156 feet west from Bonner avenue. 
Washington street, 6 feet east from Kingman court. 
Washington street, 243 feet east from Parker street. 
Washington street, 50 feet east from Bowdoin street. 
Washington street, 15 feet east from Perry street. 
Washington street, 9 feet east from Leland street. 
Washington street, 112 feet east from Dane street. 
Washington street, 175 feet west from Dane street. 
Washington street, 45 feet east from Beacon street. 
Washington street, 62 feet east from Line street. 
Water street, 91 feet north from South street. 
Water street, 254 feet north from South street. 
Water street, 354 feet north from South street. 
Waterhouse street, 24 feet south from Broadway. 
Waterhouse street. 326 feet south from Broadway. 
Waterhouse street, 630 feet south from Broadway. 
Webster avenue, 93 feet south from Washington street. 
Webster avenue, 12 feet south from Everett street. 
Webster avenue, 25 feet north from Newton street. 
Webster avenue, 63 feet north from Prospect street. 
Webster avenue, 18 feet south from Prospect street. 
Webster avenue, 78 feet north from Tremont street. 
Webster avenue, 3 feet north from Beach avenue. 
Webster avenue, 1 foot south from Columbia court. 
Webster street, 25 feet east from Cross street. 
Webster street, 9 feet east from Rush street. 
Webster street, opposite Cutter street. 
Wellington avenue, 15 feet west from Montgomery avenue. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 387 

Wesley street, 200 feet north from Pearl street. 
Wesley park, 16 feet north from Bow street. 
Wesley park, 335 feet north from Bow street. 
West street, 2 feet north from Broadway. 
West street (Ward 7), 92 feet south from Highland avenue. 
West street (Ward 7), 140 feet north from Highland avenue. 
Westminster street, 156 feet south from Electric avenue. 
Westwood road, 90 feet west from Central street. 
Westwood road, 58 feet east from Benton road. 
Wheatland street, 129 feet north from Broadway. 
Wheatland street, 9 feet south from Jaques street. 
Wheatland street, 78 feet south from Mystic avenue. 
Whipple street, 101 feet north from Highland avenue. 
Wigglesworth street, 14 feet north from Pearl street. 
William street, 8 feet east from Chandler street. 
Willoughby street, 146 feet west from Sycamore street. 
Willow avenue, 14 feet north from Summer street. 
Willow avenue, 3 feet north from Lexington avenue. 
Willow avenue, 46 feet south from Morrison avenue. 
Willow avenue, 42 feet south from Fosket street. 
Willow avenue, opposite Mallett street. 
Wilton street, 6 feet east from Nashua street. 
Wilton street, 10 feet east from Lawrence street. 
Windom street, 7 feet south from Summer street. 
Windsor road, 86 feet east from Willow avenue. 
Windsor road, 45 feet west from Hancock street. 
Winslow avenue, 145 feet east from College avenue. 
Winslow avenue, 5 feet west from Grove street. 
Winslow avenue, 8 feet west from Clifton street. 
Winter street, 130 feet east from Holland street. 
Winter-hill circle, 178 feet north from Broadway. 
Woodbine street, 222 feet west from Centre street. 
Wyatt street, 8 feet south from Taunton street. 

List of Private Hydrants Supplied from the City 
of Somerville Mains. 

John P. Squire & Co 10 

North Packing and Provision Co. 10 

New England Dressed Meat and Wool Co. 5 

Boston & Maine Railroad 7 

Union Glass Works . . .1 

Fresh Pond Ice Co. _ 1 

American Tube Works . I 

Middlesex Bleachery 3 

Boston Elevated Railway Co. 1 

Metropolitan Sewerage Pumping Station 1 

Tufts College 4 

Middlesex Paper Co. 2 

Derby Desk Co. 1 

M. W. Carr & Co [ 2 

Gates— Construction Account, 

New gates have been set In the following locations: — 

Dana street. 6-inch gate, 14 feet out from east line, and 20 feet north 
from north line of Pearl street; to control hydrant supply. 

Delaware street, 6-inch gate, 13 feet 4 inches out from west line, and 10 
feet south from south line of Pearl street; to control hydrant supply. 



;8§ 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Delaware street, 6-inch gate, 13 feet 4 inches out from west line, on south 

line of Pearl street. 
Delaware street, 6-inch gate, 12 feet 6 inches east from west line, and 

19 feet south from north line of Pearl street; to control blow-off. 
Dickson street, 6-inch gate, 13 feet 4 inches out from west line, on north 

line of Broadway. 
Plighland road, 10-inch gate, 23 feet out from east line, on north line of 

Frederick avenue. 
Packard avenue, 2-inch gate, 8 feet 'out from waterpost located 55 feet 

southwest from Powder House boulevard. 
Pearl street, 6-inch gate, 10 feet out from north line, and 11 feet east 

from west line of Pearl terrace; on hydrant branch. 
Pearl street, 6-inch gate, 20 feet south from north line, and 10 feet east 

from west line of Delaware street: for blow-off. 
Pearson road, 8- inch gate, 13 feet 4 inches out from west line, on north 

line of Warner street. 
Pritchard avenue, 6-inch gate^^ 13 feet 4 

north line of Frederick avenue. 
Pritchard avenue, 6-inch gate, 13 feet 4 

south line of Boston avenue. 
Skilton avenue, 6-inch gate, 13 feet 4 inches out from east line, on south 

line of Pearl street. 
Ware street, 6-inch gate, 13 feet 4 inches out from west line, 

line of old Ware street. 
Ware street, 6-inch gate, 13 feet 4 inches out from west line, 

line of Powder House boulevard. 



inches out from east line, on 
inches out from east line, on 



on north 
on south 



Gates — Renewal Account. 

The following changes have been made in the size and loca- 
tion of main gates : — 

Aldrich street, 6-inch gate, set 13 feet 4 inches out from west line, on 
south line of Pearl street, and 4-inch gate removed from 12 feet out 
from west line, on south Hue of Pearl street. 

Medford street, r2-inch gate, set 19 feet 6 inches out from south line, on 
west line of Chester avenue, and 12-inch gate removed from Med- 
ford street, 18 feet out from south line and 100 feet west from west 
line of Chester avenue. 

Paulina street, 2-inch gate, set 3 feet out from waterpost located 26 feet 
east from Holland street, and 2-inch gate removed from old water- 
post location on Holland street, 30 feet west from Elmwood street. 

Pearl place, 2-inch gate, set 9 feet 6 inches out from east line, on north 
line of Pearl street, and service gate removed from same location. 

Pearl street, 16-inch gate, set 15 feet out from north line, and 52 feet east 
from east line of Walnut street, and 6-inch gate removed from same 
location. 

Pearl street, 16-inch gate, set 15 feet out from north line, on west line of 
Aldrich street, and 6-inch gate removed from 15 feet out from north 
line and 10 feet vrest from east line of Dana street. 

GATES— RECAPITULATION. 



Gates. 


114" 


lii" 


2" 


3" 


4" 

1 


6" 


8" 


10" 


12" 


16" 


Total. 


Set 

Removed . . . 


1 


— 


3 
1 


— 


13 
2 


1 


1 


1 
1 


2 


21 
6 



Net increase in number of gates in 1905 .... 15 
Total number of gates in the city December 31, 1905 . 1,358 



WATER DEPARTMENT. , 389 



Locations of Water Posts. 

Albion street, 83 feet west from Centre street. 

Appleton street, 49 feet west from Willow avenue. 

Bartlett street, 26 feet south from Broadway. 

Beacon street, 33 feet north from Concord avenue. 

Beacon street, 33 feet west from Vine street. 

Beacon street, 94 feet east from Sacramento street. 

Bolton street, opposite Baxter school. , 

Bonair street, 19 feet west from Wigglesworth street. 

Bond street, 14 feet north from Broadway. 

Boston street, 107 feet west from Greenville street. 

Broadway, 75 feet west from Winthrop avenue. 

Broadway, 6 feet west from Farm lane. 

Broadway, 6 feet west from Irving street. 

Broadway, 120 feet west from Clarendon avenue. 

Broadway, 20 feet west from North street. 

Cedar street, 96 feet south from Morrison avenue. 

Cherry street, 161 feet south from Fairlee street. 

College avenue, opposite Morrison avenue. 

College avenue, 5 feet south from Kenwood street. 

Columbus avenue, 54 feet east from Walnut street. 

Concord avenue, opposite Knapp school. 

Curtis street, 50 feet east from Professors row. 

Dana street, 30 feet east from Pearl street. 

Elm street, 25 feet west from Burnside avenue. 

Flint street, 47 feet east from Cross street. 

Franklin street, 127 feet south from Broadway. 

Oilman street, 63 feet east from Walnut street. 

Grove street, 19 feet south from Highland avenue. 

Highland avenue, 44 feet west from Hamlet street. 

Highland avenue, 50 feet west from Putnam street. 

Highland avenue, 15 feet west from Central street. 

Jaques street, 159 feet west from Grant street. 

Laurel street, 20 feet south from Summer street. 

Liberty avenue, 46 feet south from Broadway. 

Linwood street, 70 feet west from Poplar street. 

Lowell street, opposite Crown street. 

Lowell street, 34 feet north from Highland avenue. 

Medford street, 35 feet east from Ward street. 

Medford street, at Gilman square. 

Medford street, 19 feet east from Glenwood road. / 

Montrose street, 204 feet west from School street. 

Mt. Vernon street, 71 feet south from Broadway. 

Mystic avenue, 33 feet west from Union street. 

Orchard street, 107 feet west from Dover street. 

Otis street, 127 feet west from Cross street. 

Packard avenue, 55 feet southwest from Powder House boulevard. 

Paulina street, 26 feet east from Holland street. 

Pearl street, 28 feet east from Myrtle street. 

Pleasant avenue, 104 feet west from Walnut street. 

Putnam street, 96 feet north from Summer street. 

School street, 116 feet south from Broadway. 

School street, 50 feet north from Berkeley street. 

Shawmut street, 74 feet north from Shawmut place. 

Somerville avenue, 175 feet east from Fitchburg R. R. crossing. 

Somerville avenue, 246 feet east from Poplar street. 

Somerville avenue, 89 feet east from Mystic street. 

Somerville avenue, 119 feet west from School street. 

Somerville avenue, 92 feet west from Kent street. 

Somerville avenue, 120 feet west from Oak square. 



390 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Somervllle avenue, 42 feet east from Mossland street. 
Summer street, 14 feet east from Belmont street. 
Summer street, 32 feet east from Cedar street. 
Summer street, 35 feet east from Cutter avenue. 
Sj'camore street, 28 feet west from Medford street. 
Temple street, 124 feet south from Heath street. 
Tremont street, 120 feet south from Webster avenue. 
Tufts street, 114 feet east from Cross street. 
Vernon street, 45 feet west from Central street. 
Washington street, 96 feet west from Myrtle street. 
Washington street, 7 feet west from Boston street. 
Washington street, 34 feet west from Union square. 
Washington street, opposite Leland street. 
Wheatland street, 30 feet south from Mystic avenue. 



Locations of Drinking Fountains. 

Belmont park D 

Broadway, opposite park, near Winthrop avenue . H 
Union square, junction Somerville avenue and 

Washington street H 

Union square, in front of Hill building . . . D I 

Lincoln park D 

Oilman square H 

Oilman square D I 

Cutter square . . C 

Davis square, in front of Medina building . . D I 

Teele square H 

H, horse trough; D, drinking fountain; I, ice water; C, combination trough and drinking 
fountain. 



, AVATEE DEPARTMENT. 391 

Summary of Statistics 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1905. 

In form recommended by the New England Water Works Association. 

SOMERVILLE WATER WORKS. 

SOMERVILLE, MIDDLESEX COUNTY, MASS. 

GENERAL STATISTICS. 

Population by census of 1905, 69,272, 
Date of construction: commenced in 1868. 
By whom owned: City of Somerville. 
Source of supply: Metropolitan water system. 

Mode of supply: water is delivered into the city's mains, under both 
high and low pressures, by the Metropolitan Water Works. 

STATISTICS OF CONSUMPTION OF WATER. 

1. Estimated total population at date, 71,000. 

2. Estimated population on lines of pipe, 71,000. 

3. Estimated population supplied, 71,000. 

4. Total consumption for the year, 2.248,741,000 gallons. 

7. Average daily consumption, 6,160,900 gallons. 

8. Gallons per day to each inhabitant, 89. 

STATISTICS RELATING TO DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM. 

MAINS. 

1. Kind of pipe, cast-iron. 

2. Sizes, from 4-inch to 20-inch. 

3. Extended 4,047 feet during year. 

5. Total now in use, 90.3 miles. 

6. Cost of repairs per mile, $.87. 

7. Number of leaks per mile, .09. 

9. Number of hydrants added during year (public and private), 17. 

10. Number of hydrants (public and private) now in use, 1,050. 

11. Number of stop gates added during year, 15. 

12. Number of stop gates now in use, 1,348. 

14. Number of blow-offs, 136. 

15. Range of pressure on mains, 35 pounds to 100 pounds. 

SERVICES. 

16. Kind of pipe: Lead; wrought iron — lead-lined; wrought iron — 
cement-lined; cast-iron. 

17. Sizes, one-half to six inches. 



18 
20 
21 
22 
24 
25 
2<) 
27 
28 
29 
30 



Extended 9,155 feet. 

Total now in use, 72.43 miles. 

Number of service taps added during the year, 220. 

Number now in use, 11,279. 

Average cost of service for the 3^ear, $21.13. 

Number of meters added. 834; discontinued, 14. 

Number now in use, 2,092. 

Percentage of services metered, 18.59. 

Percentage of receipts from metered water. 34.03. 

Number of motors and elevators added, 0. 

Number now in use, 10 (included in number of meters), 



392 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTriENT. 



Office of Chief Engineer of Fire Department, 

January 1, 1906. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen :: — 

I present herewith the annual report of the fire department 
for the year ending December 31, 1905 : — 



Fires. 



Number of bell alarms 
Number of still alarms 



Total alarms 

Value of buildings at risk 
Damage to same 
Insurance on same 
Value of contents 
Damage to same 
Insurance on same 
Total value at risk 
Total damage . 
Total insurance 



246 


175 


421 


$280,200 00 


42,466 00 


166,804 00 


109.183 00 


31,016 00 


58,631 63 


389,383 00 


73,482 00 


225,435 63 



The departinent has maintained its reputation for efficiency. 
While the number of fire alarms was greater by 112 than during 
the year 1904, yet in only eight cases was a second alarm neces- 
sary to bring the fire under control. 



Manual Force. 

The manual force of the department consists of thirty-seven 

permanent men and eighty callmen, making a total of 117 men, 
divided as follows : — 

Chief engineer 1 

Assistant engineer 1 

Three engine companies ......... 40 

Two hook and ladder companies 29 

Three hose companies ......... 23 

Two combination chemical and hose companies .... 14 

One chemical engine company 3 

One chemical and ladder apparatus 

One driver for chief . 1 

Total 117 



394: ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Equipment. 



The apparatus of the department consists of three steam fire 
engines in service, one steam fire engine in reserve, two ladder 
trucks, one chemical engine, two combination chemical and hose 
wagons, three hose wagons, and one combination ladder truck, 
chemical, and hose vehicle. 

The apparatus is in good condition except the boiler of en- 
gine No. 4, This boiler has been in service sixteen years, and 
by reason of its weakness, only a small amount of steam pressure 
is permitted. A new boiler should be provided at once, as it 
costs as much to maintain this engine, of a limited power, as one 
in first-class condition. 

There are forty-one horses belonging tO' the department, 
which are apportioned as follows : — 

Central station 10 

Engine 2 6 

Engine 4 5 

Union-square station 5 

Ladder 2 5 

Hose 2 2 

Hose 5 . . . . 2 

Hose 6 4 

Spare 2 

Total ......... 41 

Recotninendations. 

I recommend that the hose wagon located in the station at 
Broadway and Cross street (engine house No. 2) be placed in 
service. 

That a steam fire engine be placed in service in the Union- 
square fire station. 

That a fire station be built on land owned by the city on the 
corner of Broadway and Cedar street. This new station is made 
necessary by the construction 'of inflammable buildings in this 
vicinity to the value of nearly $2,000,000. 

Tn the absence of any deterrent action by the authorities to 
prevent fire, or to cause buildings to be constructed so as to be 
slow to burn, the cost of maintaining the fire-extinguishing de- 
partment must be annually increased in order to meet the added 

liability. 

It is not the fault of this department that shmgles are so 
commonlv used to cover roofs, as it has frequently been stated 
that this type of roof covering was a menace to the city in time 

of fire. . 

Much could be said of the danger of constructmg buildings 
with hollow floors, walls, and shingle roofs. Every observing 
citizen must be impressed with the dangerous risk of erecting 
buildings of this character in close proximity to each other. 



CHIEF ENGINEEK, FIRE DEPAETMENT. 



395 



When shingle roofs are dry, sparks from the first fire drop- 
ping on them are Hable to kindle more lires than the fire depart- 
ment can reach and extinguish before a conflagration is created. 

If buildings were constructed in accordance with rules es- 
tablished by the London Fire Protective Association, it would 
promote the interests of all the people, give to them better se- 
curity of life and property, lessen the cost of insurance, and 
greatly reduce the expense of maintaining the fire department. 

A table is here presented giving the cost of fire department 
maintenance in certain cities of England, Ireland, and Scotland, 
as compared with certain cities of Massachusetts (the data for 
cities of Massachusetts being from the United States census of 
1900):— 

Name. 

Boston 

Worcester 

Fall River 

Lowell 

Cambridge 

Springfield 

Newton 

Somerville 

Name. 

Liverpool 

Southampton 

Oldham 

Northampton 

Leith 

Glasgow . 

Edinburgh 

Dublin 

This difiFerence in the cost of fire department maintenance is 
made possible by fire preventive construction of buildings. 



Population, 


Cost Per Capita 


560,885 


$2.24 


118,421 


1.38 


108,863 


1.15 


94,699 


1.25 


91,866 


1.37 


62,059 


1.55 


33,597 


1.55 


61,643 


1.02 


Population. 


Cost Per Capita 


668,645 


$0.1256 


107,103 


0.056 


153,297 


0.1062 


95,000 


0.0542 


77,885 


0.1545 


755,730 


0.1117 


302,269 


0.1353 


265,000 


0.1161 



Causes of Bell Alarms. 



Accidental 

Automobile overheated 
Bonfires 

Boiling over of fat 
Burning of rubbish 
Breaking of kerosene lamp 
Boiling over of tar kettle . 
Children playing with matches 
Clothing in contact with lamp 
Clothing cleaning with naphtha 
Clothing in contact with stove 
Curtain in contact with gas jet 
Curtain in contact with lamp 
Cigarette smoking 
Chimney fire 
Campaign banner 

■ Number carried forward 



2 
2 
2 
2 
8 
5 
. 1 
16 
2 
1 
2 
3 
3 
3 
6 
2 



60 



396 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



Number brought forward 








60 


Defective chimney 








6 


Defective gas pipe 








2 


Dump fires 








14 


Drying wood in stove 








1 


Explosion of kerosene stove 








2 


Explosion of lamp 








2 


Explosion of gas 








2 


Explosion of gasolene 








1 


Electric car 








4 


Electric wires in trees 








3 


Electric wires .... 








1 


Fire crackers .... 








2 


Fireworks on roof 








2 


Fire in Medford . . . . 








4 


Fire in Cambridge 








1 


False alarms .... 








37 


Furqigating house 








1 


Grass fire 








9 


Hot ashes in a wooden receptacle 








6 


Heat from adjoining fire . 








4 


Incendiary 








5 


Light mistaken for nre 








2 


Leaking gas jet . 








1 


Lim.e slacking .... 








1 


Overheated coal stove 








4 


Overheated oil stove . 








2 


Overheated furnace 








1 


Overheated boiler room 








1 


Overheated baker's oven . 








2 


Plumber's torch .... 








2 


Rats and matches 








4 


Smoke mistaken for fire . 








1 


Sparks from chimney on roof . 








12 


Sparks from under boiler . 








2 


Sparks from railroad engine . 








5 


Sparks from snap match . 








2 


Sparks from tobacco pipe . 








4 


Sparks from plumber's furnace 








1 


Sparks from stove . . . . 








4 


Sparks from rubbish fire . 








4 


Spontaneous combustion . 








5 


Smoke from stove . . . . 








3 


Smoke from furnace . . . . 








1 


Sparks from fire box of engine . 








1 


Salamander stove . . . . 








3 


Unknown 








6 


Wooden cuspidor . . . . 








2 


Wood in contact with chimney . 

• 








2 


Total 








240 



Fire Department Account. 

CREDIT. 

$65,000 00 



Appropriation . . ... 
Receipts: — 
Electrical Department, board of horses 



300 00 



Total credit 



Amount carried forward 



$65,300 00 
$65,300 00 



CillEF EN'GTNEER, FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Amount brought forward 



DEBIT. 



Salaries of permanent men and substitute 

drivers 
Salaries of callmen . 
Improvements and repairs of apparatus and 

vehicles . . . 
Hose and repairing same 
Horses .... 
Grain and feed . 
Hay and straw . 
Washing and ironing- 
Harnesses and repairing same 
Horseshoeing . 

Ice 

Fire extinguishers . 

Horse medicine and doctorin 

Telephones 

Assistant chief's carriage 

Supplies .... 

Incidentals 

Total debit . 

x\mount overdrawn . 



$39,823 09 


14,194 02 


3.261 59 


1,050 82 


1,617 61 


1,450 37 


2,613 32 


453 54 


363 80 


1,196 20 


89 12 


57 50 


252 50 


225 73 


188 00 


893 01 


393 65 



3^r 

$65,300 00 



$68,123 87 
$2,823 87 



398 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



James R. Hopkins 
Edward W. Ring 



Roster of Department. 

Chief Engineer 
Assistant Engineer . 



27 Summit ave 
Medford st. 



ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 



Name. 

Wilfred Young, 
Frank Langer, 
John W. Bartlett, 
Percival L. Lowell, 
George F. Bixby, 
Lyle Sterling, 
Fred S. Young, 
Oscar J. Lingley, 
Benjamin F. Johnson, 
Sewall M. Rich, 
Joseph W. Mess, 
Melvin F. Underwood, 
Frank R. Rametti, 
Everett W. Bray, 



Born. 

Aug. 7, 1874, 
July 4, 1854, 
Feb. 22, 1862, 
July 1, 1877, 
March 27, 1869, 
Feb. 28, 1867, 
Feb.l, 1867, 
April 5, 1860, 
Nov. 20, 1864, 
Nov. 6, 1866, 
Sept. 25, 1863, 
Nov. 28, 1873, 
Dec. 26, 1873, 
Feb. 17, 1872, 



Rank. 

Captain, 

Lieutenant, 

Engineman, 

Asst. Engineman, 

Driver, 

Driver, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 



Occupation. 
Fireman, 
Wood Moulder, 
Fireman, 
Fireman, 
Fireman, 
Fireman, 
Water Dept., 
Milkman, 
R. R. Yard Man, 
Merchant, 
Milkman, 
Electrician, 
Lineman, 
Prov. Clerk, 



Rhsidhncb. 

Highland ave. 
Trull St. 
Lowell St. 
Marshall st. 
Highland ave. 
Summer st. 
Oxford St. 
Avon St. 
Medford st. 
Medford st. 
Chester ave. 
Medford st. 
Pearl st. 
Alston St. 



ENGINE COMPANY NO. 2. 



Name. 

Benjamin H. Pond, 

Lewis E. Seymour, 

Clarence V. Cook, 
Walter H. Young, 
Charles Spike, 
Robert Geaton, 
Cornelius A. Doherty, 
Edward W. Burgess, 
Frederick W. Kimball, 
Charles T. Garland, 
Thomas E. Nagle, 
Robert F. Garland, 
Charles M. Craig, 
David L. Stevens, 



Born. 

Oct. 25, 1867, 

March 25, 1873, 

Oct. 1, 1858, 
Dec. 25, 1869, 
Feb. 8, 1875, 
Feb. 22, 1861, 
April 30, 1873, 
Aug. 3, 1859, 
Aug. 11, 1866, 
Nov. 15, 1871, 
Nov. 7, 1869, 
June 23, 1866, 
Nov. 4, 1878, 
March 17, 1873, 



Rank. 

Captain, 
( Lieutenant, 
( Driver, 

Engineman, 

Asst. Engineman, 

Driver, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 



Occupation. 

Fireman, 

Fireman, 

Fireman, 

Fireman, 

Fireman, 

Painter, 

Milk Dealer, 

Vegetable Dealer, 

Woodworker, 

Coal Dealer, 

Teamster, 

Laundryman, 

Teamster, 

Blacksmith, 



Residence. 

Columbus ave. 

New Cross St. 

Maple ave. 
Fountain ave. 
Grant st. 
Bradley st. 
Cross St. 
Otis St. 
Brook St. 
Pearl st. 
Oliver st. 
Cross St. 
Highland ave. 
Brook St. 



ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 



Name. 

John Gillooly, 
Danforth S. Steele, 
Lindorf D. Bixby, 
George H. Crosby, 
Charles F. Hathaway, 
Robert W. Jesson, 
John F. Berton, 
James L King, 
Eugene H. Jones, 
John B. Rufer, 
Chatles A. Frink, 
George H. Keay, 



Born. 

June 9, 1856, 
Sept. 9, 1850, 
Jan. 31, 1841, 
Sept. 14, 1881, 
Feb. 11, 1876, 
May 10, 1873, 
Feb. 14, 1857, 
March 30, 1865, 
June 17, 1864, 
March 16, 1869, 
April 23, 1873, 
Sept. 23, 1868, 



Rank. 

Captain, 

Lieutenant, 

Engineman, 

Asst. Engineman, 

Driver, 

Driver, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 



Occupation. 

Fireman, 

foreman. 

Fireman, 

Fireman, 

Fireman, 

Fireman, 

Painter, 

Painter, 

Lineman, 

Blacksmith, 

Undertaker, 

Fish Dealer, 



Residence. 

Winslow ave. 
Leslie pi. 
Highland ave. 
Cross St. 
Grove st. 
Pitman st. 
College ave. 
Elm ct. 
Morrison ave. 
Chandler st. 
Irving St. 
Winslow ave. 



CHIEF exgineeh, fire department. 



399 



Name, 

Francis W. Ring, 
Daniel R. Spike, 
Henry A. Angier, 
Harry V. Spike, 
Charles A. Woodbury, 
Frederic E. Gushing, 
Benjamin Marble, 
J. Walter Holmes, 
Charles P. Fowler, 
Fred E. Knowles, 



HOSE COMPANY NO. 

Born. Rank. 

Captain, 



Aug. 7, 1854, 
March 22, 1844, 
April 3J, 1838, 
Aug. 2, 1874, 
Jan. 31, 1859, 
Dec. 20, 1845, 
May 1, 1870, 
Sept. 8, 1875, 
May 24, 1879, 
Jan. 14, 1878, 



Lieutenant, 

Driver, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 



3. 

Occupation. 

Fireman, 

Janitor, 

Fireman, 

Clerk. 

Milk Dealer, 

Painter, 

Fish Dealer, 

Victualler, 

Clerk, 

Milk Dealer, 



Rksidencb. 
Wheatland st. 
Marshall st. 
Jaques st. 
Grant st. 
Sargent ave. 
Marshall st. 
Sargent ave. 
Marshall st. 
Hamlet st. 
Jaques st. 



HOSE COnPANY NO. 3. 



Name. 

Henry J. Turner, 
Alfred R. Higgins, 
Joseph F. Green, 
Thomas W. Joy, 
Edward A. Parker, 
Francis S. Brown, 
I Walter J. Green, 
Peter J. Kelley, 
Thomas L. Deegan, 



Born. 
Feb. 24, 18G5, 
Feb. 25, 1849, 
Aug. 9, 1878, 
Feb. 22, 1850, 
Oct. 29, 1851, 
Feb. 4, 1845, 
Oct. 25, 18G8. 
March 29, 1879, 
Oct. 15, 1877, 



Rank. 

Captain, 

Lieutenant, 

Driver, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 



CCCUPATICN. 

Fireman, 

Park Laborer, 

Fireman, 

Cooper, 

Park Laborer, 

Watchman, 

Florist, 

Teamster, 

Blacksmith, 



Residence. 

Somerville ave. 
Prospect St. 
Mystic St. 
Hawkins st. 
Prescott St. 
Columbus ave. 
Somerville ave. 
Fountain ave. 
Mystic St. 



Name. 
Edwin F. Trefren, 
William J. Blaisdell, 
Abner Peterson, 
Martin E. Driscoll, 
Horace L. Dunklee, 
George R. Green, 
Albert F. McGrath, 
Frederick G. Jones, 
Adam H. Gibby, Jr., 



Name. 

Joseph A. Cribby, 
Arthur M. Oilman, 
Elmer C. Shiere, 
Charles H. Bridges, 
Homer A. White, 
William Stern, 



Name. 

George W. Bridges, 
Arthur C. Sellon, 
George R. Dale, 
Harry G. White, 
Charles W. Hughes, 
Alfred M. Pride, 
William P. Young, 
Frederick L. Jensen, 



HOSE COnPANY NO. 

Born. Rank. 



March 28, 1858, 
May 16, 1846, 
Feb. 28, 1879, 
Dec. 21, 1872, 
Dec. 12, 1854, 
Feb. 27, 186G, 
July 14, 1877, 
Nov. 26, 1866, 
Sept. 2, 1874, 



Captain, 

Lieutenant, 

Driver, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 



5. 

Occupation. 
Fireman, 
Painter, 
Fireman, 
Painter, 
Fireman, 
Florist, 
Butcher, 
Patrol Driver, 
Electrician, 



HOSE AND CHEniCAL COflPANY NO. 6. 



BOKN. 

Aug. 22, 1864, 
Aug. 19, 1866, 
Apr. 29, 1878, 
Nov. 29, 184S, 
July 27, 1865, 



Rank. 

Captain, 

Lieutenant, 

Driver, 

Hoseman, 

Hoseman, 



Sept. 19, 1873, Hoseman, 



Occupation. 

Fireman, 

Fireman, 

Fireman, 

Machinist, 

Painter, 

Paperhanger, 



HOSE AND CHEniCAL COnPANY NO. 7. 



Born. Rank. 

March 22, 1876, Lieutenant, 

July 16, 1863, Driver, 

June 22, 1871, Hoseman, 

June 14, 1S70, Hoseman, 

March 26, 1876, Hoseman, 

Apr. 6, 1869, Hoseman, 

Jan. 24, 1877, Hoseman, 

July 2, 1872, Hoseman, 



Occupation. 

Fireman, 

Fireman, 

Fireman, 

Electrician, 

Painter, 

Carpenter, 

Plumber, 

Painter, 



Residence. 

Lowell St. 
Summer st. 
Porter st. 
Miller st. 
Somerville ave, 
Somerville ave. 
Elm. place. 
Somerville ave. 
Summer st. 



Residence. 

Newbury st. 
College ave. 
Elm St. 

Westminster st. 
Newbury st. 
Newbury st. 



Residence, 
Newbury st, 
Hancock st. 
Josephine ave. 
Hudson St. 
Highland ave. 
Hudson st. 
Cedar st. 
Highland ave. 



400 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 







CHEHICAL 


A. 






Name. 


Born. 


Rank. 




Occupation. 


Residence 


trank L. Draper, 


July 3 1, 1852, 


Lieutenant, 




Fireman, 


Chester ave. 


Charles H. Timson, 


May 27, 1859, 


Driver, 




J'ireman, 


Highland ave, 


John T. Coneeny, 


Nov. 2, 1876, 


Operator, 




Fireman, 


Ellsworth St. 



HOOK AND LADDER COHPANY NO. 1, 



Name. 
Melvin B. Ricker, 
Herbert L. Webber, 
Richard F. Clarkson, 
Joseph A. Sander, 
William A McLane, 
Patrick J. FoUon, 
James D. Perkins, 
James E. Thompson, 
John H. Ford, 
Frank H. Eaton, 
Charles A. Caswell, 
John H. Koy, 
Charles M. Davis, 
George A. Row, 
Israel Y. Hall, 



Born. 
Aug. 30, 1841, 
Nov. 9 1869, 
May 18, 1859, 
Apr. 28, 1868, 
Jan. 7, 1860, 
March 3, 1859, 
Nov. 25, 1858, 
Sept. 1, 1869, 
July 16, 1859, 
Feb. 1, 1855, 
Jan. 18, 1870, 
May 16, 1867, 
Dec. 5, 1878, 
Jan. 19, 1867, 
June 24, 1878, 



Rank. 
Captain, 
Lieutenant, 
Driver, 
Fireman, 
Ladderman, 
Ladderman, 
Ladderman, 
Ladderman, 
Ladderman, 
Ladderman, 
Ladderman, 
Ladderman, 
Ladderman, 
Ladderman, 
Ladderman, 



Occupation. 

Fireman, 

Painter, 

Fireman, 

Fireman, 

Engineer, 

Laborer, 

Paperhanger, 

Laborer, 

Painter, 

Laborer, 

Laborer, 

Painter, 

Mason, 

Teamster, 

Laborer, 



Residence, 
Prospect St. 
Columbus ave. 
Homer sq. 
Grove st. 
Clark St. 
School St. 
Bow-st. pi. 
Broadway. 
Oak St. 
Prospect pL 
Webster ave. 
Somerville ave. 
Washington st. 
Somerville ave. 
Homer sq. 



Name. 

Horace W. Hutchins, 
Charles E. Shaw, 
Harry F. Bucknam, 
John E. Hill, 
Clarence T. Conant, 
William J. Kennedy, 
Le Baron Emery, 
John H. Givan, 
Charles F. Mills, 
Joseph E. E nery, 
David B. Nixon, 
James A. Fiutler, 
George A. Givan, 
Walter H. Thomas, 



HOOK AND LADDER COHPANY NO. 2 

Born. Rank. 



Aug. 26, 1866, 
Oct. 13, 1857, 
Sept. 21, 1872, 
Dec. 25, 1845, 
Dec. 10, 1868, 
March 19, 1863, 
May 11, 1859, 
June 9, 1865, 
Aug. 26, 1876, 
Aug. 2, 1870, 
March 4, 1869, 
Oct. 29, 1881, 
Oct. 8, 1863, 
Nov. 12, 1850, 



Captain, 

Lieutenant, 

Driver, 

Ladderman, 

Ladderman, 

Ladderman, 

Ladderman, 

Ladderman, 

Ladderman, 

Ladderman, 

Ladderman, 

Ladderman, 

Ladderman, 

Ladderman, 



Occupation. 


Residence, 


Fireman, 


Hancock st. 


Paperhanger, 


Eastman rd. 


Fireman, 


Highland ave. 


Salesman, 


Cherry st. 


Milkman, 


Hudson St. 


Plumber, 


Woodbine st. 


Painter, 


Alpine st. 


Grocer, 


Highland ave. 


Carpenter, 


Alpine st. 


Painter, 


Alpine st. 


Painter, 


Cedar st. 


Clerk, 


Lowell St. 


Clerk, 


Eastman rd. 


Janitor, 


Highland ave. 



I desire to thank his honor the mayor and the board of 
aldermen for their support in all measures conducive to the 
interests of the department and the members of the depart- 
ment for their loyal service in carrying on its successful work. 

I am not unmindful of the aid rendered by many citizens 
in an emergency, and to each I return my grateful apprecia- 
tion of their services. 

Respectfully submitted, 

James R. Hopkins, 

Chief Engineer. 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF POLICE. 



Office of the Chief of Police, ) 

January 1, 1906. f 

To the Honorable, the Mayor, and Board of Aldermen of the 

City of Somervnlle : — 

Gentlemen, — T respectfully submit a report of the doings of 
the police department for the- year ending December 31, 1905, 
with suggestions and recommendations for your consideration : — 

Arrests. 

Whole number of arrests made 1 714 

Males *. ' 1 617 ' 

Females *.*.'.*.'.' 97 

Americans .* .' ] 877 

Foreign born '.*.'. 837 

Residents .' .* 1 054 

Non-residents ', '^ 'qqq 

Number held for trial for following offences ...'.* .1 658 

Adultery 2 ' 

Assault and battery * ! 168 

Assault, felonious 9 

Bastardy 6 

Breaking and entering 45 

Contempt of court 3 

Cruelty to animals . . . . ' . , . . . 2 

Drunkenness 881 

Disturbing the peace 17 

Evading railroad fare ........ 1 

Fraud 5 

Keeping for sale adulterated food ...... 18 

Keeping unlicensed dog 1 

Larceny 177 

Malicious mischief 60 

Murder 1 

Neglected children 23 

Neglect to support family 40 

Peddling without license 8 

Receiving stolen property 3 

Stubborn child 12 

Threats 4 

Vagrancy 23 

Violation of election laws ...'.... 8 

Violation of city ordinances 65 

Violation of liquor law 6 

Violation of Lord's day 33 

Walking on railroad track 15 

Wilful trespass 27 

1,658 



402 ANNIJAL REPORTS. 

Miscellaneous. 

Buildings found open and secured 601 

Defective streets reported 455 

Obstructions in streets reported 54 

Larcenies reported 257 

Amount reported stolen $G,556 

Amount recovered . . $3,700 

Number of street light reports 1,857 

Water pipes reported leaking 61 



Police Signal, Patrol Wagon, and Ambulance Service. 

Whole number of on duty reports made by the patrolmen 
W^hole number of runs made with wagon 
Whole number of prisoners conveyed to station . 
Whole number of miles run with wagon .... 
Whole number of telephone calls 



. 232,335 

991 

1,074 

1,508 

9,361 

Whole number of persons carried in ambulance .... 340 

Suggestions and Recommendations. 

By an arrangement with Ernest W. Bailey, city engineer, 
the regular police officers have performed police duty on the 
public parks, but the expense has been paid from the appropria- 
tion for public grounds. 

This system has been tried for two years, and if the service 
is to be continued, I would suggest that the expense be provided 
for and paid from the police account, and that additional patrol- 
men be appointed upon the force, so that the regular police offi- 
cers would be relieved from doing extra duty on the parks. 
Such a change would place the responsibility for the police ser- 
vice upon one head and one department. I would recommend 
that ten patrolmen of the reserve force be promoted to the rank 
of regular police officers, and that ten new reserve 'officers be 
appointed to fill the reserve force to its maximum number, they 
to be temporarily instead of permanently employed to police the 
parks and to cover vacant routes while officers are on their vaca- 
tions, and to be a reserve force in fact as well as in name. 

The increased expense of maintaining this additional number 
of reserve officers to perform such work would be but a tritle 
more than has been expended by the two departments this year. 
The department as at present organized is large enough to police 
the city during the fall and winter months. 

I suggest for your respective consideration a growing neces- 
sity for ways and means to keep pace w^ith the up-to-date methods 
of criminals in pursuing their calling. First, horses, as well as 
human beings, are too slow in their movements to overtake 
thieves in automobiles; to equip this department with an auto- 
mobile to make it more efYective would be a trifling expense 
compared to the value it would be many times for dispatchmg 
officers upon call to remote sections of the city quickly. The 
signal system was for a number of years a terror to criminals, 



CHIEF OF POLICE. 403 

but within a few years incendiaries, housebreakers, and highway- 
men have been known to operate and get away quickly and suc- 
cessfully upon a wheel or power vehicle. 

Also, for the use of the department, to increase the efificiency 
of the street patrol, one or two mounted officers could find 
enough to do six months of the year to patrol sections where 
licensed automobilists defy the speed laws, not so much for the 
purpose of making arrests, but to have a general supervision over 
and caution such ofifenders, and command 'a respect for the laws 
and ordinances, which a police officer on foot cannot do. 

Also', the feasibility of building a police station in the vicinity 
of Davis square, on College avenue. This improvement has been 
agitated for a number of years; in fact, the late Hon. Mark F. 
Burns, mayor of Somerville A. D. 1887, said in his inaugural 
address as follows : — 

''One serious defect in our 'police arrangements, and one 
which should be remedied in the near future^ is lack of station 
houses in East Somerville, Winter hill, and Davis square. One 
station house for so large a territory is not sufficient." But the 
police signal was established in 1888, the next year, and for a time 
provided a relief and better police protection for West Somerville, 
so called, but that section of the city has more than trebled in 
population and valuation in property since that date. The de- 
partment's total membership in 1888 was thirty men, and for sev- 
eral years I have anticipated recommending the erection of a sta- 
tion in the place designated. It would relieve the Bow-street 
station from sending men and wagons two and one-half miles 
upon every emergency call. Many times they are called to other 
sections of the city While the wagon is out, and the officers have 
to wait for it to return. To maintain an up-to-date police service, 
one or more stations should be erected very soon. The police 
signal register records the calls at present, but with more street 
signal boxes and more patrolmen the system will have to be 
divided, also. 

In General. 

The force was not increased in number during 1905. There 
was one death. Patrolman George E. Reece died April 17, 1905, 
havin«- served since September 16, 1902. Two patrolmen were 
retired upon half pay at their own request on account of dis- 
ability March 23, 1905, namely, Phineas W. Skinner and Albion 
L. Staples. 

Promotions to the regular from the reserve force were : 
James M. Lynch and Martin Sharry, April 5, and Henry Y. Gil- 
son, May 11 ; and to fill vacancies in the reserve force, Denis 
Neylon, John J. Cummings, and Denis Downey were appointed 
April 13, 1905, and Edward M. Davies May 25, 1905. 

The force consists of a chief of police, one captain, three lieu- 



404 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

tenants, four sergeants, one inspector, forty-four regular and ten 
reserve patrolmen permanently employed ; total, sixty-four. 
With our present population, it cannot be said the department is 
too large. 



1Fn /iDemoriam 

PATROLMAN GEORGE E. REECE. 
Died April 17, 1905. 



CHIEF OF POLICE. 



405 



Official Roster of Department. 

Melville C. Parkhurst, Chief. 

Robert R. Perry, Captain. Dennis Kelley, Lieutenant. 

Eugene A. Carter, Lieutenant. Charles E, Woodman, Lieutenant. 

Edward McGarr, Sergeant. George H. Carleton, Sergeant. 

Eugene H. Gammon, Sergeant. James M. Harmon, Sergeant. 

Thomas Damery, Inspector. 



PATROLMEN. 



Allen, Charles W. 
Allen, Harry L. 
Arnold, Louis F, 
Balconi, Frederick J. 
Bolton, David A. 
Burns, Samuel 
Byrnes, Charles E. 
Carleton. Ira S. 
Carter, Edward M. 
Chisholm, Jotham 
Dadmun, John A. 
Davidson, William J. 
Dodge, Ezra A. 
Drew, Eimer E. 
Fuller, Harvey R. 
Fuller, John E. 
Gilson, Henry Y. 
Goff, Ernest S. 
Googins. Frederick H. 
Gott, Myron S. 
Graves, Frank H. 
Heron, Theodore E. 



Hilton, Herbert 
Hopkins, Frank C. 
Howe, Hudson M. 
Johnston, Charles S. 
Johnston, William H. 
Kennedy, Michael T. 
Lewis, Sanford S. 
Lynch, James M. 
McNamara, Thomas F. 
Perkins, Francis A. 
Pollard, James J. 
Ray, John A. 
Reick, Charles W. 
Rice, George L. 
Sharry, Martin 
Simons, Daniel G. 
Skinner, Jacob W. 
Smith, George L. 
Stevens, Charles W. 
Sudbey, Henry A. 
Sutherland, William J. 
Woodsum, Eugene A. 



RESERVE POLICE FORCE. 



Blair, Robert T. 
Grossman, Claude L. 
Cummings, John J. 
Davies, Edward M. 
Downey, Denis 



Howard, Ernest 
Kcane, Edmund J. 
Neylon, Denis 
Peters, George A. C. 
Simons, Lemuel J. 



In conclusion, I wish to thank all who have assisted the 
police force in the performance of their duty. To my officers 
and other subordinates, I extend my -heartfelt thanks for their 
support daring the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Melville C. Paekhurst, 

Chief of Police. 



REPORT OF SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND riEASURES. 



Office of Sealer of WEicnTS and Measures^ ") 
City Hall Annex, Somerville^ January 6, 1906. | 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen : — 

The following report of the sealer of weights and measures 
for the year 1905 is respectfully submitted : — 

Section 21, chapter 62, of the Revised Laws provides that 
sealers of w^eights and measures shall annually give public notice, 
by advertisement or by posting, in one or more public places in 
their respective cities and towns, notices to all inhabitants or per- 
sons having usual places of business therein who use weights, 
measures, or balances for the purpose of selling goods, wares, 
merchandise, or other commodities, or for public weighing, to 
bring in their weights, measures, and balances to be adjusted and 
sealed. Such sealers shall attend in one or more convenient 
places, and shall adjust, seal, and record all weights, measures, 
and balances so brought in. 

Section 34 of the same chapter provides that each sealer of 
weights and measures, including the county treasurers, shall re- 
ceive a fee of one dollar for sealing each platform balance if 
weighing five thousand pounds or more, and fifty cents if weigh- 
ing less than that amount, and three cents each for sealing all 
other weights, measures, scales, beams, or balances. He shall 
also have a reasonable compensation for all necessary repairs, 
alterations, and adjustments made by him. 

Where weights, measures^ and balances are sealed as pro- 
vided in wSection 21 (that is, brought to the ofifice), no fee is 
charged for sealing. 

In compliance with the foregoing Section 21, the customary 
notice was given by advertising in the Somerville Journal in 
March, 1905. 

During the year the sealer visited all places in the city where 
goods were bought or sold, tested all scales, weights, and meas- 
ures, sealed those which were found correct, and condemned all 
found beyond repair and useless. 

One hundred and fifty-six scales, weights, and measures 
were adjusted before sealing, seven scales were tagged for repairs, 
four of which were repaired as ordered, and the remaining three 
put out of use. Four coal bins were measured during the year. 



SEALEE OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



Work done in the office during the year 1905 

Number of scales sealed 
Number of weights sealed . 
Number of dry measures sealed . 
Number of tin cans and measures sealed 
Number of glass milk jars sealed 
Number of yard sticks sealed 
Number of coal baskets sealed . 

Total number sealed 
Number of scales adjusted and sealed 
Number of weights adjusted and sealed 
Number of dry measures adjusted and sealed 

Total number adjusted and sealed 
Number of scales tagged for repairs . 
Number of scales repaired as ordered 

Total number tagged and repaired 
Number of scales tested and condemned . 
Number of dry measures tested and condemned 
Number of liquid measures tested and condemned 
Number of coal baskets tested and condemned 

Total number condemned .... 

Total number of tests made in the office . 



is as follows 

247 

204 

684 

1,335 

93,701 

2 

87 



407 



46 
4 
1 



12 
15 

8,422 
1 



96,210 



51 



8,450 



104,715 



Work done outside of the office: — 

Number of scales tested and sealed . 
Number of weights tested and sealed 
Number of dry measures tested and sealed 
Number of liquid measures tested and sealed 
Number of yard sticks tested and sealed . 
Number of coal baskets and bins tested and sealed 

Total number sealed 

Number of scales adjusted and sealed 
Number of weights adjusted and sealed . 
Number of dry measures adjusted and sealed . 
Number of liquid measures adjusted and sealed 

Total number adjusted and sealed 
Number of scales tagged for repairs . 
Number of scales repaired as ordered 

Total number tagged and repaired 
Number of scales tested and condemned . 
Number of dry measures tested and condemned 
Number of liquid measures tested and condemned 
Number of yard sticks tested and condemned . 

Total number condemned .... 

Total number of tests outside of office 

Total number of tests in and out of office . 



1,174 
3,763 
1,054 
1,384 
111 
10 



77 

21 

4 

3 



5 

62 

12 

1 



7,496 



105 



80 



7,688 



112,403 



408 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Receipts for the year 1905 : — 

Appropriation . • $1,050 00 

Received as fees for sealing .... 424 72 

Received as fee for adjusting .... 5 35 

Total receipts $1,480 07 

Expenditures for the year 1905: — 

Printing, books and supplies .... $76 59 

Amount paid to helper 154 00 

Amount paid for team 242 50 

Salary of sealer 1,000 00 

Total expenditures for year 1905 . . 1,473 09 



Unexpended balance .... $6 98 

John H. Dusseault, 
Sealer of Weights and Measures. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



Somerville, January 8, 19()G. 
To the Honorable, the Mayor, and Board of Aldermen of the 
City of Somerville: — 

The following is mv report as city solicitor for the year 
1905:— 

Wellington Bridge. Under chapter 491 of the acts of the 
legislature for the year 1901, the metropolitan park commission 
constructed a new bridge over the Mystic river at Middlesex 
avenue, costing $181,261.61. Commissioners appointed by the 
supreme court, under the provisions of the same chapter, made 
an apportionment of the expense of construction and mainte- 
nance, putting one-eighth of each upon the city of Somerville. 
For about thirty years the city had been sharing equally with 
Medford the entire cost of maintaining the former bridge. 

Metropolitan Park District. The regular five yearly appor- 
tionment of the expenses of the metropolitan park district, 
under chapter 419 of the acts of the legislature for the year 1899, 
was made this year, being the second actual apportionment since 
the district was established. Under the apportionment of the 
year 1900, Somerville paid as its proportion for parks and bou- 
levards .03472, and for Nantasket beach, .0340305. Under the 
apportionment of this year, Somerville is required to pay during 
'the next five years as its proportion for parks .02866 ; for boule- 
vards, .02994; and for Nantasket beach, .02855. The decrease 
is due principally to the fact that Boston, which formerly paid 
fiity per cent, under a special provision of the statute, is required 
by this apportionment to pay more than sixty-two per cent, for 
parks and for Nantasket beach. 

Abolition of Grade Crossings. On petitions of the mayor and 
aldermen, which had been pending in the superior court some 
five years, and which I was directed early this year by the city 
government to take up in earnest, the superior court in June, 
notwithstanding opposition by the railroad corporations, ap- 
pointed a commission, in the manner provided by law, to inves- 
tigate the situation, and, if it should decide in favor of the aboli- 
tion of the crossings, tO' determine in what manner the work 
shall be done. The absence of the chairman of the commission 
has caused much delay ; but a meeting was finally arranged be- 
tween him and our city engineer, and the latter is now engaged 
in the preparation of plans to be presented before the commission. 
The petitions relate to all five crossings of the Fitchburg division 
of the Boston & Maine railroad, namely, vSomerville avenue, 



410 ANNUAL EEPOETS. 

Medford street, Webster avenue, Dane street, and Park street, 
and to the crossing at Somerville avenue of the Boston & Albany 
railroad company 

Lowell-street Bridge. In accordance with additional authority 
given this year by the city government, petitions were tiled with 
the county commissioners for the construction of bridges at 
Lowell street, over the main line and the branch line of the Bos- 
ton & Lowell railroad corporation now leased to the Boston & 
Maine railroad. The railroad corporations opposed the petitions ; 
but, after many hearings, decrees have recently been issued by 
the county commissioners ordering the construction of the 
bridges. It is not disputed that public convenience and neces- 
sity require bridges at that place ; but the railroad corporations 
contend that the city should lay out a public way in the usual 
manner, thereby giving them a claim against the city for dam- 
ages, and freeing them from the obligation of making payments 
toward the expense of constructing and maintaining the bridges. 
Further proceedings in the superior court are necessary upon the 
decree relating to the bridge over the main line, in order to deter- 
mine who shall do the w^ork and by whom the expense shall be 
paid. 

By chapter 278 of the acts of the legislature for the year 1905, 
provision was made for the burial of wires in certain streets of 
the city. The act is in nearly all respects like those passed in the 
years 1900 and 1902, relating to the burial of w^ires in Springfield 
and Worcester. The legislature refused to pass a similar act for 
another city adjoining Boston. 

Cases in courts have been disposed of as follows: — 

Two actions in the superior court for injuries claimed to 
have been received by reason of defects in highways were settled 
for $75 and $250, respectively. 

Three actions in the police court ior injuries claimed to have 
been received bv reason of defects in highways were tried and 
judgments given in favor of the city, from which the plaintiffs 
have appealed to the superior court. 

An action for $5,000 on account of damages to property oti 
Hall street, claimed to be due to the filling of a water course with 
ashes and other refuse by the health department, w^as tried before 
a jury in the superior court, and a verdict was given against the 
city for $400. The case will be reported to the supreme court by 
the justice before whom it was tried. 

In an action brought against the city in the name of Michael 
O'Keeffe to test the constitutionality of the trading stamp act, 
chapter 403 of the acts of the year 1004, the supreme court has 
given an opinion in favor of the plaintiff. 

At the request of the mayor and tlie chief of police, I took 
part in the trial of several cases in the police court, brouglit 
against four election officers of precinct 1, in ward 6, for neglect 
of duty at the state election, two of the defendants, who had 



/ ! CITY SOLICITOR. 411 

sent substitutes, were foimd guilty and sentenced to imprison- 
ment and the payment of fines. On appeal to the superior court, 
the complaints under which they were sentenced to imprisonment 
were nol prossed, and to the other complaint they pleaded guilty 
and paid the fines. A third defendant,, who failed to send a sub- 
stitute, and reported for duty about forty minutes after the time 
for opening the polls, was found guilty, received sentences like 
those of the other defendants, and appealed. His appeal is now 
pending. The fourth defendant, who neither served nor sent a 
substitute, claimed that he was not an election officer, but he was 
held by the court for the grand jury. 

An action brought in the name of the collector of taxes to 
recover a personal property tax from Greenleaf W. Simpson, who 
claimed that he was not a resident of this city at the time of the 
assessment, was tried before a jury in Suffolk county, and a ver- 
dict was given in favor of the defendant. Another action brought 
by trustee process in the Suffolk superior court to recover a per- 
sonal property tax from a resident of New York was settled by 
payment in full without trial. 

Very respectfully, 

; Feank W. Kaan, 

City Solicitor. 



REPORT OF THE CITY CLERK. 



Office of the City Clekk, ) 
January 1, 1906. j 

To the Honorable, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen : — 

Gentlemen, — The following is respectfully submitted as the 
thirty-fourth annual report of the city clerk of the city of Somer- 
ville, and is for the year ending December 31, 1905 : — 

The receipts and payments were as follows : — 



Receipts. 

Balance from year 1904, being for dog li- 
censes issued in December, 1904: — 

35 males at $2.00 

9 females at $5.00 



Less city clerk's fees paid to the treasurer 
in December, 1904, 44 at $.20 

For dog licenses issued in 1905: — 

1,583 males at $2.00 

312 females at $5.00 

6Q spayed at $2.00 

4 breeders' licenses at $25.00 

Recording mortgages, assignments, etc., 

908 papers 

Certificates of marriage intentions, 727 

at $.50 . ^ 

Furnishing copies of records 
Licenses : 

To collect junk, 33 at $10.00 . 

1 license refused, but money not called 
for 

For junk shop, 2 at $25.00 . . . 

For billiard and pool tables and bowling 
alleys, 17 licenses for 58 tables and 12 
alleys, at $2.00 

To private detectives, 2 at $10.00 . 

To auctioneers, 23 at $2.00 

To sell fireworks, 49 at $1.00 . 

To keep intelligence offices, 11 at $2.00 . 

For amusements, 41 at $1.00 . 

To street musicians, 24 persons at $.50 . 

4 persons refused licenses, but money 
not called for 

Amounts carried forward . . . . 



$70 00 
45 00 


$115 00 


8 80 


$3,166 00 

1,560 00 

132 00 

100 00 


$523 25 


363 60 
52 25 


330 00 


10 00 
50 00 


140 00 
20 00 
46 00 
49 00 
22 00 
41 00 
12 00 


2 00 



$100 20 



4,958 00 



.,661 00 $5,064 20 



CTit CLERK. 



413 



Amounts brought forward .... .|1,601 00 

To slaughter cattle, 5 at $1.00 ... 5 00 

1 refused, but money not called for . 1 00 

To keep roller skating rink, 2 at $25.00 . 50 00 

Recording and issuing liquor licenses, 3-1 

at $1.00 34 00 

Interest on deposits 12 38 



Total receipts 



$5,064 20 



1,763 38 



$6,827 58 



Payments. 

To Joseph O. JIayden. county treasurer, 
June 1 and December 1, receipts for 
dog licenses from December 1, 1904, to 
November 30, 1905, both inclusive: — 

1,615 males at $2.00 

319 females at $5.00 

m spayed at $2.00 

4 breeders' licenses at $25.00 



Less city clerk's fees, 2,004 at $.20 . 

To the city treasurer, monthly: — 

City clerk's fees for issuing and recording- 
dog licenses, 1,965 at $.20 
All the receipts above specified, except for 
dog licenses 



Total payments 

Balance January 1, 1906, being for dog li- 
censes issued in December: — 

3 males at $2.00 

2 females at $5.00 



Less city clerk's fees paid to the city 
treasurer, 5 at $.20 



$3,230 00 

1.595 00 

132 00 

100 00 

$5,057 00 
400 80 



$393 00 
1,763 38 



$4,656 20 



2.156 



$6,812 58 



$6 00 
10 00 



$16 00 
1 00 



$15 00 



Licenses and Permits. 

Besides the licenses mentioned in the foregoing list of re- 
ceipts, licenses and permits have been granted and issued without 
charge, as follows: — 

Amusements, Somerville High School Athletic Association, foot- 
ball games ffees remitted) 14 

Innholders 3 

Common victuallers 43 

Auctioneers (to veterans of the Civil War) 4 

Drain layers 12 

Drain layer's license granted, but bond not filed .... 1 

Newsboys . . 323 



414 



AJ^^KrAL llEPORTg. 



Newsboys' licenses revoked 

Jiink collectors, to cry calling in streets 

To cry goods in streets 

Number in addition granted but not called for .' 
To ring bell in streets: — 

Ice cream venders 

Number in addition granted but not called for 

Scissors' sharpeners 

Umbrella menders 

To Socialist party to hold series of outdoor meetings 
To set up and use engines: 

gas engines . 

steam engine 

electric engine 
To blast rock or stone . 
To maintain projections over 

signs 

lights attached to buildings 

barber s pole .... 

awnings 

chutes over sidewalk . 

gas light and sign corner of street 
To set and maintain hitching posts 
To place and maintain stepping block 
To construct coal holes in sidewalk 
To move buildings through streets 
To Somerville Fourth of July Associ 

grounds for the purpose of the celebration 
To use storage tank for kerosene oil . 
To use building for keeping, storage, and sale of gasolene 
To keep lying-in hospital ....... 

To lay iron pipe in street 




sidewalk 






on outer 



edge of sidewalk 



ation to use certain public 



10 
33 
38 
15 

1 

7 
4 
3 
1 

9 
1 
1 
{) 

25 
4 
1 
4 
1 
1 

r? 
I 

2 

2 

15 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



Gas and Pole Locations. 

The Cambridge Gas Light Company and the Charlestown 
Gas and Electric Company have been granted permission to lay 
gas mains in sundry streets. 

Permission has also been given The New England Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Company of Massachusetts and The Edison 
Electric Illuminating Company of Boston to erect poles for the 
support of wires in various streets. 

In every case of such permission to use the streets, a suitable 
agreement for the protection of the interests of the city must be 
filed with the city clerk before the order can become operative. 



Births. 



Number of births (exclusive of still-births) in Somerville 

in 1905 registered . . . 1,570 

Less than previous vear 

Males ... * 796 

Females 774 

1,570 



CITY CLERK. 



41i 



Born of American parents 

Born of foreign parents . . . . . 

Born of American father and foreign mother 

Born of foreign father and American mother . 

Born of American mother and father of unknown 
nationaHty ........ 

Born of foreign mother and father of unknown nation- 
ality 

Number of still-births in Somerville in 1005 registered . 

Number of births in other places in 1905 registered in 

Somerville 



Number reported by both canvasser and physician or 
midwife ......... 

Number reported by canvasser alone .... 

Number reported by physician or midwife 

Number reported by clerk or registrar of other place 
and canvasser 

Number reported by clerk or registrar of other place 
and physician ........ 

Number .reported by clerk or registrar of other place, 
canvasser and physician 

Number reported by clerk or registrar of other place . 

Number of still-births taken from death records . 

Number of births found in death records and not other- 
wise reported 

Number of cases of twins 

Number of cases of triplets 



5G1 
G4-1 
172 
181 

8 



1,173 
391 

156 

24 

23 

7 

2G 

9 

18 



1,570 

58 

190 



1,827 



1,827 

21 

1 



riarriages. 



Number of intention certificates "issued in 1905 
More than previous year .... 
Marriages registered .... 
More than previous year .... 
Both parties American .... 

Both parties foreign 

American groom and foreign bride 
Foreign groom and American bride 

First marriage of 

Second marriage of . 

Third marriage of 



CI I 



. . . 


28 


. . . 


778 


. 


42 


411 




178 




98 




91 






778 couples 




1,398 




148 




10 






778 .couples 



Deaths, 

(Exclusive of still-births.) 



Number of deaths in Somerville in 1905 
More than previous year 

Males 

Females 



453 
515 



968 
4 



%8 



416 



A:Nr^UAL REPORTS. 



Under ten years of age ." 
10 and under 20 years of age 
20 and under 30 years of age 
30 and under 40 years of age 
40 and under 50 years of age 
50 and under 60 years of age 
60 and under 70 years of age 
70 and under 80 years of age 
80 and under 90 years of age 
90 years of age and over 

Age of oldest person deceased 

Born in Somerville 

Born in other places in the United 

Of foreign birth 

Birthplace unknown 



slumber 


of deaths 


in January 


'' 




February 


<< 




March 


(( 




April , 


ii 




May . 


a 




June 


a 




July . 


it 




August 


(( 




September 


ii 




October 


u 




November 


a 




December 



States 



96 yrs 



243 

26 
67 
68 
80 
98 
132 
172 
74 



968 

mos. 14 dys. 

233 

433 

300 

2 



dm 



90 

82 

107 

80 

76 

57 
86 
82 
72 
71 
88 
77 



968 



The number of still-births recorded during the year was fifty- 
eight. 

In addition to the above, 126 deaths which occurred else- 
where v/ere recorded in Somerville, almost the entire number of 
persons deceased having been residents of this city. 



CITY CLERK. 



417 



Assessed Polls and Registered Voters. 

MEN'S LISTS. 







Precinct. 


As- 
sessed 
Polls, 
May 

1, 
1905. 


Registered Voters. 


Ward. 


Dec. 
1, 

1904. 


Re- 
vised 
Lists 

of 

Aug. 

1, 


Added 

in 

Sept. 

and 

Oct., 

1905. 


Oct. 

18, 

1905. 


Added 

in 
Nov., 
1905. 


Nov. 

23, 

1905. 


Voted 

Nov. 

7, 
1905. 


Voted 

Dec. 

12, 

1905. 










1905. 














Ward 1 . . 
" 1 . . 
" 1 . . 
" 1 . . 


Precinct 1 ... 

2 . . . 

3 . . . 

4 . . . 


1,290 
518 

528 
684 


743 

331 
385 
390 


637 
'/86 
322 
336 


82 
37 
39 
61 


719 
323 
361 
397 


13 
6 
9 
4 


732 
329 
370 
401 


577 
265 
293 
359 


532 
214 
286 
343 




3,020 


1,849 


1,581 


219 


1,800 


32 


1,832 


1,494 


1,375 


Ward 2 . . 
" 2 . . 
" 2 . . 


Precinct 1 ... 

2 . . . 

3 . . . 


1,105 

1,296 

841 


453 

603 
461 


383 

527 
405 


14 

28 
16 


397 

555 
421 


12 

9 

14 


409 
564 
435 


257 
385 
254 


290 
368 
294 




3,242 


1,517 


1,315 


58 


1,373 


35 


1,408 


896 


952 


Ward 3 . . 
" 3 . . 


Precinct 1 ... 
2 . . . 


964 
1,191 


690 
759 


631 

697 


34 
40 


665 
737 


3 
3 


668 
740 


489 
525 


449 
503 




2,155 


1.449 


1,328 


74 


1,402 


6 


1,408 


1,014 


952 


Ward 4 . . 
" 4 . . 


Precinct 1 . . • 
2 . . . 


1,284 
849 


818 
642 


741 

554 


51 
34 


792 

588 


9 
4 


801 
592 


593 
473 


560 
421 




2,133 


1,460 


1,295 


85 


1,380 


13 


1,393 


1,066 


981 


Ward 5 . . 
•• 5 . . 
" 5 . . 


Precinct 1 . . . 

2 . . . 

" 3 . . . 


1.199 

674 
884 


822 
427 
490 


732 
366 
447 


61 
37 
30 


793 
403 
477 


12 

8 
1 


805 
.411 

478 


661 
312 
376 


595 
306 
341 




2,757 


1,739 


1,545 


128 


1,673 


21 


1,694 


1,349 


1,242 


Ward 6 . . 
'• 6 . . 
" 6 . . 


Precinct 1 ... 

2 . . . 

3 . . . 


1,421 
1,149 

807 


906 
705 
451 


817 
610 
424 


40 

57 
49 


857 
667 
473 


2 
8 
6 


859 
675 
479 


531 

483 
349 


494 
422 

277 




3,377 


2,062 


1,851 


146 


1,997 


16 


2,013 


1,363 


1,193 


Ward? . . 
•' 7 . . 


Precinct 1 ... 
2 . . . 


1,115 
1,589 


703 
903 


633 
810 


44 

75 


677 

885 


11 

19 


688 
904 


512 
654 


423 
556 




2,704 


1,606 


1,443 


119 


1,562 


30 


1,592 


1,166 


979 


City . . . 


19,388 


11,682 


10,35^ 


829 


11,187 


153 


11,340 


8,348 


7,674 



418 



ANNUAL EEPORTS. 



WOMEN*S VOTING LISTS. 



Ward. 


Precinct. 


Dec. 

1. 
1904. 


Revised 

Lists of 

Aug. 1, 

1905. 


Added in 
Sept. 

and Oct., 
1905. 


October 

18, 

1905. 


Added. 

in Nov.. 

1905. 


Nov. 

23, 

1905. 


Voted 
Decem- 
ber 12, 
1905. 


Wardl . . . 


Precinct 1 


25 


21 




21 




21 


10 


" 1 . . . 


2 . 


5 


5 


, , 


5 




5 




" 1 . . . 


3 . 


9 


i 




7 




i 


i 


1 . . . 


4 . 




•• 














39 


33 




33 




33 


11 


Ward 2 . . . 


Precinct 1 


3 


3 


.. 


3 




3 




" 2 . . . 


2 . 


5 


5 




5 




5 




«' 2 . . . 


3 


1 


1 




1 

9 




1 


• • 




9 


9 


• • 




9 


.. 


Wards . . . 


Precinct 1 


33 


27 




27 




27 


4 


" 3 . . . 


2 . 


51 

84 


50 


i 


51 




51 


8 




77 


1 


. 78 


78 


12 


Ward 4 . . . 


Precinct 1 


21 


18 




18 




18 


5 


" 4 . . . 


•' 2 . 


20 


19 


i 


20 




20 


6 






41 


37 


1 


38 




38 


11 


Ward 5 . . . 


Precinct 1 . 


48 


47 


3 


50 




50 


4 


" 5 . . . 


2 . 


11 


9 




9 




9 


3 


" 5 . . . 


" 3 . 


11 


11 




11 




11 


1 




70 


67 


3 


70 




70 


8 


Ward 6 . . . 


Precinct 1 


44 


40 


1 


41 




41 


2 


" 6 . . . 


2 . 


21 


18 




18 




18 




" 6 . 


3 . 


3 


3 


i 


4 


1 


5 


2 




68 


61 


2 


63 


1 


64 


4 


Ward? . . . 


Precinct 1 . 


95 


86 


1 


87 




87 


9 


" 7 . . . 


2 . 


111 


104 




104 


—1 


103 


10 






206 
517 


190 


1 


191 


—1 


190 
482 


19 


City . . 


474 


8 


482 




65 



CITY CLERK. 



419 



Elections. 

The following- is a statement of the votes cast, in the several 
wards of the city, for the candidates for the various offices, at the 
state election held November 7, 1905: — 



Candidatb. 


Party. 


Wards. 


■< 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


h 

o 
H 


GOVERNOR. 




















Charles W. Bartlett, 


Democratic, 


661 


578 


251 


246 


467 


407 


260 


2,870 


James F. Carey, 


Socialist, 


19 


26 


18 


18 


26 


35 


24 


166 


William H. Carroll, 


Socialist Labor, 


3 


4 


2 




7 


8 


2 


26 


Curtis Guild, Jr., 


Republican, 


750 


263 


726 


774 


829 


881 


844 


5,067 


WiUard O. Wylie, 


Prohibition, 


5 


3 


5 


11 


5 


11 


20 


60 


Blank, 




56 


22 


12 


17 


15 


21 


16 


159 


LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR. 


















Thomas F. Brennan, 


Socialist Labor, 


16 


10 




8 


6 


10 


1 


51 


Eben S. Draper, 


Republican, 


680 


239 


"640 


679 


722 


743 


731 


4,434 


Patrick Mahoney, 


Socialist, 


16 


27 


16 


21 


24 


35 


18 


157 


John H. Smith,' 


Prohibition, 


14 


3 


8 


15 


5 


16 


27 


88 


Henry M. W-kitney, 


Democratic, 


682 


594 


323 


318 


556 


526 


363 


3,362 


Blank, 




86 


23 


27 


25 


36 


33 


26 


256 


SECRETARY. 




















Charles C. Hitchcock, 


Socialist, 


17 


29 


19 


25 


33 


41 


23 


187 


Jonathan S Lewis, 


Prohibition, 


29 


5 


8 


12 


6 


18 


23 


101 


Henry B. Little, 


Democratic, 


493 


506 


162 


144 


333 


269 


173 


2,080 


William M. Olin. 


Republican, 


761 


287 


782 


836 


900 


952 


884 


5,402 


Moritz E. Riither, 


Socialist Labor, 


40 


3 


1 


1 


14 


10 


5 


74 


Blank, 




154. 


66 


42 


48 


63 


73 


58 


504 


TREASURER AND 


RECEIVER 


















GENERAL. 




















Christopher D. Albro, 


Prohibition, 


15 


6 


9 


12 


8 


17 


25 


92 


David S. Brodeur, 


Socialist, 


14 


27 


19 


25 


37 


37 


28 


187 


Arthur B. Chapin, 


Republican, 


803 


283 


788 


829 


910 


963 


922 


5,498 


Joao Claudino, 


Socialist Labor, 


10 


5 


4 


4 


9 


13 


17 


62 


Daniel F. Doherty, 


Democratic, 


500 


521 


148 


140 


306 


256 


110 


1,981 


Blank, 




152 


54 


46 


56 


79 


77 


64 


528 


AUDITOR. 




















Patrick J. Ashe, 


Democratic, 


490 


512 


156 


136 


306 


257 


118 


1,975 


Herbert B. Griffin, 


Prohibition, 


19 


3 


9 


18 


10 


22 


28 


109 


E. O. Fredrik Hansson, 


Socialist Labor, 


9 


8 


3 


2 


11 


18 


2 


53 


Ambrose Miles, 


Socialist, 


13 


24 


20 


24 


31 


33 


27 


172 


Henry E. Turner, 


Republican, 


789 


281 


772 


822 


901 


944 


919 


5,428 


Blank, 




174 


68 


54 


64 


90 


89 


72 


611 


ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 


















Allen Coffin, 


Prohibition, 


21 


3 


18 


26 


18 


29 


38 


153 


Henry C. Hess, 


Socialist Labor, 


6 


17 


2 


12 


10 


14 


2 


63 


John P. Leahy, 


Democratic, 


515 


510 


170 


179 


325 


284 


131 


2,114 


Dana Malone, 


Republican, 


758 


282 


744 


744 


882 


909 


891 


5,210 
212 


John Weaver Sherman, 


^Socialist, 


26 


27 


25 


25 


32 


42 


35 


Blank, 




168 


57 


55 


80 


82 


85 


69 


596 



420 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Candidate. 



Party. 



COUNCILLOR. 

Warren W. Rawson, 
George A. Sanderson, 
Squire Putney, 
Blank, 



SENATOR. 

Charles E. Blaisdell, 
Alvah E. Dearborn, 
Elmer A. Stevens, 
Blank, 



Republican, 
Democratic, 



Socialist, 

Democratic, 

Republican, 



REPRESENTATIVE, SIXTH DIST. 



John Diggins, 

F. DeWitt Lapham, 

Blank, 



Democratic, 
Republican, 



REPRESENTATIVES, 7TH DIST. 



Republican, 
Republican, 
Democratic, 
Republican, 
Democratic, 
Democratic, 



Charles V. Blanchard, 
Robert Luce, 
John L. Nichols, 
Arthur P. Vinal, 
Lawrence J. Ward, 
Frederick J. White, 
Warren C. Daggett, 
Squire Putney, 
F. W. Wolffe, 
Nicholas Plimpton, 
S. J. Holzwasser, 
W. H. Berry, 
Blank, 



REPRESENTATIVE, EIGHTH DIST. 



John P. Burke, 
John J. Higgins, 

Charles A. Kenneson, 

Blank, 



Democratic, 
Republican, 
Republican 
Citizens' Nom. 
Paper, 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER. 



Frederick Bancroft, 
Levi S. Gould, 
G. E. Hatch, 
Blank, 



Democratic, 
Republican, 



REGISTER OF PROBATE AND 
INSOLVENCY. 



Alfred Belanger, 
William E. Rogers, 
Blank, 



Democratic, 
Republican, 









Wards 










1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


76 


i 272 


770 


803 


871 


I 918 


895 


53 


? 530 


186 


173 


35; 


J 315 

1 


178 


19 


2 94 


58 


90 


12, 


) 129 


93 


2' 


J 33 


20 


32 


3f 


i 48 


32 


50( 


3 529 


180 


164 


31( 


5 291 


158 


79 


I 209 


709 


812 


89i 


i 935 


888 


17i 


i 65 


45 


58 


9 


89 


88 


79( 


) .... 












64 


i .... 












5 


3 .... 














266 


729 






910 


870 






265 


757 








915 


801 






461 


178 








291 


167 






274 


780 








923 


866 






479 


126 








234 


112 






493 


169 


... 






255 

1 
1 
2 

1 
1 

1 


146 






450 


303 








554 


473 








133 


32{ 


) .... 










625 


70^ 


I .... 












257 


25J 


) .... 






.... 




51 


5' 




.... 


52' 


r 518 


183 


164 


34( 


) 297 


154 


78£ 


, 275 


758 


815 


89£ 


> 939 
1 


906 


18^ 


t 103 


73 


87 


108 


126 


106 


521 


525 


162 


144 


31£ 


271 


135 


788 


! 273 


778 


8-.:9 


89f 


> 948 


923 




18£ 


> 98 


74 


93 




13£ 


) 144 


108 



5,293 

2,273 

1 

781 



228 
2,144 
5,362 

014 



790 

646 

58 



2,801 

1,097 

2,843 

951 

1,063 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1,780 



402 
1,329 

516 

108 



2,189 

5,371 

1 

787 



2,077 
5,434 

837 



CITY CLERK. 



421 



The following is a statement of the votes cast in the several 
wards of the city for the candidates for the various offtces, and on 
the questions submitted to the voters, at the city election held 
December 12, 190'5 :— 











Wards. 






< 


Candidate. Party. 


































1 


2 


S 


4 


5 


6 


7 


H 


MAYOR. 


















( Citizens' Nom. ) 
Abraham A. Elston, < Paper, [ 


665 


748 


343 


365 


489 


519 


350 


3,479 


( Democratic, ) 
Charles A. Grimmons, Republican, 
S. Holzwsser, 
James Wilson, 
Albion A. Perry, 
W. A. Chandler, 
Blank, 


672 

"38 


190 
"14 


585 

"i 

23 


585 
' 31 


731 

"22 


655 

1 
1 
1 

""16 


613 

"ie 


4,031 
1 
1 

1 

1 

160 


ALDERMAN-AT-LARGE, WARD 1. 


















John P. Rouse, Democratic, 
Elmer H. Spaulding, Republican, 
Blank, 


518 
741 
116 


537 
199 
216 


178 

676 

98 


141 

707 
133 


346 
759 
137 


278 
753 
162 


104 
723 
152 


2,102 
4,558 
1,014 


ALDERMAN-AT-LARGE, WARD 2. 














• 




William H. Smith, Republican, 

George Rand, 

Thomas Jones, 

William Kelly, 

C. A. Page, 

George L. Marshall, 

Blank, 


716 
'659 


505 

"i 

446 


744 

'208 


729 
*252 


840 

"""i 

'461 


844 

"i 

"i 

347 


740 
1 

'238 


5,118 

1 
1 
1 

1 
2,551 


ALDERMAN-AT-LARGE, WARD 3. 


















William F. Barker, Republican, 

Frank Brown, 

Blank, 


660 
715 


283 

1 

668 


704 
"248 


718 
'263 


825 
"417 


795 

. *398 


736 
'243 


4,721 
1 

2,952 


ALDERMAN-AT-LARGE, WARD 4. 


















Henry T. Gallishaw, Democratic, 
Sidney B. Keene, Republican, 
Blank, 


453 
597 
325 


487 
189 
276 


173 

&i8 
131 


169 
702 
110 


302 
759 
181 


272 
709 
212 


102 
698 
179 


1,958 
4,302 
1,414 


ALDERMAN-AT-LARGE, WARD 5. 


















Jesse S. Newcomb, Republican, 
Wm. F. McKenna, 
E. L. Jensen, 
Blank, 


660 
"715 


270 
'682 


685 
"267 


723 

'258 


912 

1 

1 

328 


778 
'415 


730 
"249 


4,758 
I 
1 

2,914 


ALDERMAN-AT-LARGE, WARD 6. 


















Frank D. Wilkins, Republican, 

William L. Waugh, 

Charles W. Eld ridge, 

David Piggott, 

John B. Rufus, 

E. A. Mahoney, 

John B. Rufer, 

J. B. Ruffer, 

Blank, 


667 

708 


255 
"697 


686 
266 


699 

'282 


820 

"i 
'421 


822 
365 


726 
"253 


4,675 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

2,992 



422 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Candidate. 



Party. 



ALDERMAN-AT-LARGE, WARD 7. 



Zebedee E. Cliff, 
John Taylor, 
Blank, 



Republican, 



WARD ALDERMEN (2) WARD 1. 

David B. Armstrong, Republican, 

Edward Coliton, Democratic, 

William F. Remnick, Democratic, 

William F. Remick, 

Thomas W. Sutherland, Republican, 

Blank, 



WARD ALDERMEN (2) WARD 2. 



William A. Flaherty, 
John M. Hanson, 
Frank J. Lane, 
Joseph P. Phillips, 
Blank, 



Democratic, 
Republican, 
Republican, 
Democratic, 



WARD ALDERMEN (2) WARD 3. 

William M'. Armstrong, Republican, 
Leonard W. Cole, Republican, 

Blank, 



WARD ALDERMEN (2) WARD 4. 



Democratic, 
Republican, 
Democratic, 
Republican, 



John Joseph Dellea, 
Charles W. Hodgdon, 
Charles S. McCarthy, 
David C. Theall, 
C. A. Kirkpatrick, 
Daniel O'Brien, 
J. H. Kimball, 
Blank, 



WARD ALDERMEN (2) WARD 5. 



Charles A. Burns, 
John T. Donovan, 
Francis Q. Harrington, 
J. Frank Mixer, 
Blank, 



Republican, 
Democratic, 
Democratic, 
Republican, 



Wards. 



653 
722 



631 
572 
636 
1 
674 
236 



WARD ALDERMEN (2) WARD 6. 

John F. Aylward, Democratic, 

Frank P. Gould, Democratic, 

Chester S. McFarland, Republican, 

Richard Van Ummersen, Republican, 
Sam Hodzwsser, 
Blank, 



WARD ALDERMEN (2) WARD 7. 

I Republican ) 

Ind. Nom. Paper, ! 
Republican, ) 

f Republican ^ 

T-j J Tj -LT- J Ind. Nom. Paper, ! 

Edward H. Kingman, -< -^s *• r 

* Democratic, ( 

(^Republican, J 

Blank, 



271 

*68i 



631 
219 
190 
607 
257 



684 
268 



694 

287 



854 

1 

387 



793 
400 



834 
'i45 



719 

704 
481 



132 

705 

112 

742 

1 

1 

1 

268 



803 
300 
306 
804 
271 



285 
270 
753 
731 
1 
346 



783 

786 
389 



4,783 
1 

2,890 



631 
572 
636 
1 
674 
236 



631 

219 
190 
607 
257 



719 
704 

481 



132 

705 

112 

742 

1 

1 

1 

268 



803 
300 
306 
804 
271 



285 
270 
753 
731 
1 
346 



783 

786 
389 



CITY CLERK. 



433 



Candidate. 



Party. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE (2yrs.) WARD 1 



Henry F. Curtis, 
John T. Quinn, 
Blank, 



Republican, 
Democratic, 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE (2yrs.) WARD 2 



Daniel H. Bradley, 
Edward F. Carl, 
Blank, 



Democratic, 
Republican, 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE (2 yrs.) WARD 3 



George E. Whitaker, 
Fred. J. White, 
Blank, 



Republican, 
Democratic, 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE (2 yrs.) WARD 4 

Douclass B. Foster, Democratic, 

Charles A. Kirkpatrick, Jr., Republican, 
Blank, 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE(2yrs.)WARD5 



Wards. 



Henry H. Folsom, 
Albert E. Hughes, 
F. H. Flynn, 
Blank, 



Republican, 
Democratic, 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE (2 yrs.) WARD 6 

Frederick A. P. Fiske, Republican, 
Joseph H. Frazer, Democratic, 

Blank, 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE (2yrs.) WARD 7 



George C. Mahoney, 
Geo. Mahoney, 
Blank, 



Republican, 
Democratic, 



SHALL LIQUOR LICENSES BE 
GRANTED ? 

Number of " Yes " votes. 
Number of " No " votes. 
Blank, 



SHALL CHAPTER 373 OF THE ACTS 
OF 1905 BE ACCEPTED? 



Number of " Yes " votes. 
Number of " No " votes. 
Blank, 



736 
538 
112 



598 
190 
164 



676 

192 

96 



520 
697 
158 



437 
341 
597 



609 

251 

92 



248 
279 
425 



254 
639 

59 



3.50 
207 
395 



402 

515 

75 



207 

722 
52 



372 
185 
424 



770 

398 

1 

81 



778 
256 
163 



348 

831 

63 



445 
292 
505 



341 

787 
65 



414 
264 
515 



77 
113 



204 

733 

42 



371 
193 
415 



736 

538 
112 



598 
190 
164 



676 

192 

96 



402 
515 

75 



770 

398 

1 

81 



778 
256 
163 



808 

77 

113 



2,483 

4,660 

531 



2,637 
1,761 
3,276 



424 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Liquor License Question. 

The statement of the votes during the several years of its 
submission to the people on the question of granting licenses for 
the sale of intoxicating liquors in this city is continued in this 
report. 

The power of the board of aldermen to grant licenses of the 
sixth and seventh classes is not affected by the vote on this ques- 
tion. In fact, the law provides that the board shall annually 
grant one or more licenses of the sixth class. These two classes 
are defined as follows : — 

Sixth Class, — Licenses to retail druggists and apothecaries to sell 
liquors of any kind for medicinal, mechanical, or chemical purposes 
only, and to such persons only as may certify in writing for what use 
they want them. 

Seventh Class, — Licenses to dealers in paints or in chemicals to sell 
alcohol for mechanical, manufacturing, or chemical purposes only. 

The following is a statement of the votes on the question, 
the number of registered voters, and the estimated population in 
the several years : — 



Year. 


Yes. 


No. 


Blank. 


Registered 
Voters. 


Estimated 
Population. 


1881 


979 


1,222 




3,678 


26,000 


1882 


627 


1,159 




3,778 


26,500 


1883 


767 


1,343 




4,407 


27,000 


1884 


806 


1,709 




4,470 


28,000 


1885 


428 


1,604 




3,969 


*29,992 


1886 


214 


1,321 




4,089 


32,000 


1887 


555 


2,427 




4,574 


34,000 


1888 


744 


2,456 




5,399 


36,000 


1889 


635 


1,706 


335 


5,286 


39,000 


1890 


999 


2,282 


409 


5,556 


♦40,117 


1891 


1,054 


2,598 


279 


5,938 


43,000 


1892 


1,427 


3,288 


347 


7,587 


46,000 


1893 


1,547 


2,654 


218 


7,943 


48,000 


1894 


1,098 


2,869 


246 


8,007 


50,000 


1895 


1,854 


4,708 


459 


8,410 


*52.200 


1896 


1,466 


3,680 


332 


9,379 


54,000 


1897 


1,626 


3,815 


486 


8,925 


56,000 


1898 


1,595 


3,501 


486 


8,657 


57,500 


1899 


1,892 


3,340 


374 


8,838 


60,000 


1900 


1,660 


3,427 


321 


9,620 


*61,643 


1901 


1,579 


3,295 


374 


9,499 


63,500 


1902 


1,645 


3,242 


360 


10,100 


65,000 


1903 


2,248 


4,410 


550 


11,346 


67,000 


1904 


2,022 


4,388 


447 


11,682 


69,500 


1905 


2,483 


4,(i60 


531 


11,3^0 


*69,272 



Census. 



CITY CLERK. 425 



GEORGE I. VINCENT. 

Early in the year the city suffered the loss of its city clerk, 
George I. Vincent. 

Mr. Vincent was born in Somerville July 6, 1851. His 
parents removed to Bangor, Me., in 185.1, where he resided until 
their return to Somerville in 1867. 

For the next seven years he was in the employ of an import- 
ing goods house in Boston as office boy, and later as entry clerk, 
which position he occupied until he entered the employ of the city 
in March, 187-i. 

His first appointment in the municipal service was by Mayor 
Furber, as clerk for the board of assessors. To this duty was 
added the clerkship of several committees, and, in 1878, that of 
the board of health. In 1882 the of^ce of clerk of assessors and 
committees was created by ordinance, and Mr. Vincent was its 
first incumbent. 

On February 28, 1888, he was unanimously elected city 
clerk, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of former City Clerk 
Charles E. Oilman, and continued in that office until his death on 
February 5, 1905. 

Beginning his service but two years after the city's incorpo- 
ration, his labor in municipal affairs, extending over a period of 
more than thirty years, had brought him into close personal re- 
lations with all who had been identified in any way with the city's 
growth and development. To them, and to the public at large, 
the announcement of his death came with the force of a great 
public calamity. 

Loyal and true to every duty, steadfast for the right, of un- 
failing courtesy, a wise counsellor, and a staunch friend, — Mr. 
Vincent was an ideal man and public servant. 

Frederic W. Cook, 

City Clerk, 



ORDINANCES. 



Somerville, February 17, 1906. 
The following ordinances have been adopted since the 
printing of the annual reports for the year 190-L. 

Fkederic W. Cook, 

City Clerk. 

No. 52. 
An Ordinance to Provide for Printing of List of City Employees. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Somerville, 
as folloz^'s: — 

Section 1. The mayor shall cause to be printed within one month 
after the first day of May and the first day of November in each year a 
list of all persons employed by the city during the whole or any portion 
of the period of six months preceding each of said days. Such list shall 
show the name, sex, age, place of residence, department, nature of posi- 
tion or service^ date of original entrance into service, date of cessation 
of service, duration of service in the six months, compensation received, 
increase or decrease of rate of compensation as compared with the pre- 
vious six months, and whether a citizen of the United States. 

Section 2. This ordinance shall take efifect upon its passage. 

At proved March jo, 7905. 

No. 53. 

An Ordinance to Amend Section Two of Cliapter Eleven of the 
Revised Ordinances of 1900, Entitled »* Board of Health." 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Somerville, 
as folloivs: — 

Section 1. Section two of chapter eleven of the Revised Ordinances of 
1900 is hereby amended by striking out the words "and may call upon 
the police department and other officers of the city to aid it in the per- 
formance of its duties," and inserting in place thereof the words, "pro- 
vided, however, that the offal shall be sold directly to the retail pur- 
chasers, and the proceeds of the sales shall be credited to the health de- 
partment account," so that said section shall read as follows: Section 2. 
The board of health shall make provision by contracts, or in such other 
manner as it shall deem expedient for the cleansing of private cesspools, 
\aults, and privies, and for the collection, carrying away, sale, and dis- 
posal of the house offal and the ashes and house dirt of the city; pro- 
vided, however, that the offal shall be sold directly to the retail pur- 
ciiasers, and the proceeds of the sales shall be credited to the health 
department account. It shall annually, in the month of January, make 
a report to the Board of Aldermen. 

Section 2. The board of health may call upon the police department 
and other officers of the city to aid it in the performance of its duties. 

Section 3. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 5, 1905. 



CITY CLEEK. 427 

No. 54. 

An Ordinance Relative to the Placing of Wires Underground. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Somerville, 
as follows: — 

Section 1. The commissioner of electric lines and lights is hereby- 
designated as the officer who shall have the authority and perform the 
duties provided for by chapter 278 of the Acts of the Legislature of Mas- 
sachusetts for the year 1905. entitled "An act relative to wires and elec- 
trical appliances in the city of Somerville." 

Section 2, This ordinance shall take eftect upon its passage. 

Approved May 2g>, 1905. 

No. 55. 

An Ordinance to Amend Chapter Twenty=seven of the Revised 

Ordinances of 1900. Entitled *' Hawkers and Pedlers." 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Somerville, 
as follozvs: — 

Section 1. Section 1 of chapter 27 of the Revised Ordinances of 
1900 is hereby amended by striking out the words "one of chapter sixty- 
eight of the public statutes," and inserting in place thereof the words, 
fifteen of chapter sixty- five of the Revised Laws as amended by chapter 
three-hundred and seventy-seven of the Acts of the Legislature of Mas- 
sachusetts, of the year nineteen hundred and five, entitled "An Act 
relative to Hawkers and Pedlers," so as to read as follows; Section 1. 
No hawker or pedler shall expose for sale or sell any of the articles 
enumerated in section fifteen of chapter sixty- five of the Revised Laws 
as amended by chapter three hundred and seventy-seven of the acts of 
the legislature of Massachusetts of the year nineteen hundred and five, 
entitled "An Act Relative to Hawkers and Pedlers," unless, within 
one year prior thereto, he shall have recorded his name and residence 
with the board of health, and been assigned a number and furnished a 
certificate of such record by said board. Said certificate shall be ex- 
hibited by him whenever requested by a police officer, or the sealer of 
weights and measures, or any agent or member of the board of health. 

Section 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved July 14, 1905. 

No. 56. 

An Ordinance to Repeal Section 6 of Chapter XXIX of the 
Revised Ordinances of 1900. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Somerville, 
as follozvs: — 
Section 1. Section 6 of chapter XXIX of the Revised Ordinances of 
1900 is hereby repealed. 

Section 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved December jo, 190^- 

No. 57. 
An Ordinance to Repeal Ordinance No. 52. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Somerville, 
as follozvs: — 
Section 1. An ordinance entitled "An Ordinance to Provide for 
Printing of LiFt of City Employees," passed by the Board of Aldermen 
March 23, 1905. and approved by the mayor March 30, 1905, is hereby 
repealed. 

Section 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved February 9, 1906. 



JURY LIST OF THE CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Prepared by the Registrars of Voters, under Chapter 176 of the 
Revised Laws, January 30, 1906. 

Posted February 13, 1906, and accepted by the Board of Aldermen 
March 9, 1906. 



Abbott, Alonzo F., 8 Concord avenue, Packing agent. 
Adams, Charles, 117 Highland avenue. Machinist. 
Adams, Charles M., 22 Highland rd.. Insurance adjuster. 
Adams, Frank H., 46 Summer street, Treasurer. 
Adcock, John H., 205 Highland avenue. Plumber. 
Albee, John G., 101 Flint street, Clerk. 
Alexander, Harrison B., 4 Highland avenue, Brakeman. 
Allen, George H., 29 Rogers avenue, Real estate dealer. 
Allison, James W., 95 Mt. Vernon street, Carpenter. 
Andrews, Francis H., 27 Knowlton street, Brakeman. 
Andrews, Horace W., 172 Broadway, Builder. 
Andrews, John, 34 Albion street, Agent. 
Armstrong, Thomas W., 39 Partridge avenue. Watchman. 
Arnold, L. Frank, 28 Vinal avenue. Treasurer. 
Attwood, J. Lorenzo, 18 Herbert street. Bookkeeper. 
Atwater, George W., 1 Avon street. Foreman. 
Atwell, Horace F., 7 Newbury street, Salesman. 



B 

Babb, Charles D., 37 Bradley street, Salesman. 
Babb, Nathaniel F., 193 School street. Salesman. 
Babbitt, Artemas B., 110 Perkins street. Machinist. 
Bacon, OHver, 19 Pembroke street. Bookkeeper. 
Baier, Fred J., 7 Shawmut place, Electrician. 
Bailey, Walter C, 72 Mt. Vernon street. Engraver. 
Baker, Jacob, 26 Trull street, Paperhanger. 
Baker, Nicholas, 9 Bedford street. Cooper. 
Baker, Roger H., 9 Bedford street, Cooper. 
Baker, Roswell F., 26 Hudson street. Salesman. 
Ball, Charles C, 122 Holland street. Clerk. 
Bancroft, Edward A., 31 School street. Barrel dealer. 
Barker, William H., 367 Summer street. Manufacturer. 
Barnes, Frank, 24 Milton street. Box manufacturer. 
Bartlett, George E., 5 North Union street. Machinist. 
Bassett, Albert H., 17 Everett street, Real estate agent. 
Bateman, Charles R., 1228 Broadway, Station master. 
Beals, William H., 27 Howe street. Clerk. 
Bean, George W., 21 Webster avenue, Retired policeman. 
Bean, John D., 3 Lincoln street, Teamster. 
Beckley, Henry F., 221 Morrison avenue. Salesman. 
Beckman, Frank W., 36 Stone avenue. Clerk. 
Beirne, Patrick H., 154 Linwood street, Brass finisher. 
Belding, Oscar H., 182 Highland avenue, Builder. 
Bennett, Dana W., 41 Putnam street, Insurance agent. 
Bennett, Daniel J., 37 Stone avenue, Harness maker. 
Bentley, George W., 19 Adams street. Com. merchant. 
Berry, Arthur W., 53 Hudson street, Builder. 



d'tlRY LIST. 409 



Berton, John R, 134 College avenue, Painter. 
Bertwell, Henry P., 20 Cameron avenue, Car conductor. 
Bilhngs, George A., 75 Willow avenue, Collector. 
Bishop, William R, 20 Wheeler street. Bookkeeper. 
Blake, Charles M., 11 Preston road, Newsdealer. 
Blake, Frank R., 21 Derby street. Machinist. 
Boodry, George R., 26 Josephine avenue, Stereotyper. 
Booker, James A., 20 Windsor road. Clerk. 
Bossey, Charles W., 22 Ashland street, Salesman. 
Bossey, Thomas R, 111 Elm street. No occupation. 
Bosworth, William H., 10 Powder House ten, Adv. mgr. 
Boutin, Abraham, 18 Park avenue. Janitor. 
Bowen, Lorenzo W., 16 Broadway, Decorator. 
Bowman, Henry R, 10 Winter-hill circle. Lithographer. 
Boyer, George R., 29 Wigglesworth street. Builder. 
Brabrook, Albert A., 126 Walnut street, Clerk. 
Brackett, Ira A., 60 Burnside avenue, Carriage dealer. 
Bradley, Daniel A., 67 Beacon street, Piano finisher. 
Bradshaw, Charles H., 7 Westwood rd.. Real estate agt. 
Brady, George E., 318 Somerville avenue. Confectioner. 
Brady, William J., 76 Rogers avenue, Clerk. 
Branagan, James, 62 Dane street. Produce. 
Bremner, John A., 40 Bow street, Picture frame mfr. 
Brett, Charles G., 50 Cedar Street, Clerk. 
Briggs, Sylvester R., 110 Pearl street, Broker. 
Brigham, Charles A., 3 Dell street, Produce salesman. 
Brine, Charles F., 36 Columbus avenue. Tailor. 
Brown, Charles E., 36 Albion street, Carpenter. 
Brown, Fred E., 311 Washington street, Bookkeeper. 
Brown, Fred R., 258 Broadway, Expressman. 
Brown, John H., 311 Washington street, Painter. 
Brown, Lyman H., 42 Columbus ave.. Livery stable kpr. 
Brown, William C, 58 Beech street. Builder. 
Buckley, Patrick W., 17 Garden court, Confec'y dealer. 
Bucknam, Davis P., 12 Vine street. Mason. 
Bullard, Walter H., 22 Stickney avenue, Grocer. 
Bunten, Frederick R., 32 Cedar St., Feather duster mfr. 
Burbank, Munroe A., 9 Autumn street. Butter dealer. 
Burgess, Edward W., 59 Otis street, Pedler. 
Burgess, William H., 38 Cambria street. Bond salesman. 
Burke, Walter W., 337 Washington street, Hatter. 
Burns, Arthur M., 20 Auburn avenue. Insurance agent. 
Bursaw, William J., 428 Broadway, Insurance agent. 
Burton, Edward H., 41 Meacham rd., Provision salesman. 
Burton, Walter, 2 Homer square. Artist. 
Bushee, Charles E., 370 Somerville avenue. Druggist. 
Butters, Charles S., 51 Church street. Provision dealer. 
Butterworth, Robert, 172 Summer street. Manufacturer. 
Buttimer, ^Maurice, 351 Lowell street, Contractor. 



Cadwallader, Thomas J., 3 Lawson terrace, Gateman. 
Cain, John, 147 Cross street. Packer. 
Caldwell, David J., 50 Preston road, Clerk. 
Cameron, William G., 5 Lester terrace, Carpenter. 
Camp, Dan M., 60 Sydney street, Salesman. 
Campbell, William J., 26 Loring street. Machinist. 
Card, Frederick L., 243 Pearl street, Provision dealer. 
Carl, Edward F., 27^/^ Rossmore street. Harness maker. 
Carpenter, Albert Q., 7 Sargent avenue, Tinsmith. 



430 ANNUAL EErOETS. 

Carr, Roy W., 130 College avenue, Confectioner. 
Carr, William R., 26 Fairmount avenue, Real estate agt. 
Carruth, Frederick J., 34 Willow avenue. Salesman. 
Cate, Nathan E., 28 Everett avenue, Freight clerk. 
Cavanaugh, Maurice F., 7 Bowdoin street, Teamster. 
Chadwick, A. LeRoy, 30 Charnwood road, Cashier, 
Chalmers, David, 9 Lincoln street, Motorman. 
Chandler, Charlie S., 7 Medina bldg.. Elm st.. Painter. 
Chapin, Hiram O., 44 Dover St., Commission merchant. 
Chase, Washington I., 85 Vine street^ Distiller. 
Cheeney, Clinton L., 38 Berkeley street. Confectioner. 
Chickering, William H., 15 Evergreen avenue. Clerk. 
Christie, Trott K., 22 Oliver street, Teamster. 
Christopher, Emerson R., 219 Summer street. Grocer. 
Clancy, Edward F., 90 Webster avenue. Candy maker. 
Clark, Charles W., 21 Westminster street, Shipper. 
Clark, George W., 65 Central street. Cruller mfr. 
Clarke, Charles E., 31 Berkeley street, Salesman. 
Clarke, George B., 31 Berkeley street, Electrotyper. 
Clement, Herman J., 35 jNIarshall street. Printer. 
Clough, Warren A., 64 Church street. Pattern maker. 
Coan, Thomas S., 18 Fremont street. Bookkeeper. 
Cochran, Orlando R., 5 Campbell park. Salesman. 
Coffin, Clarence D., 67 Hall avenue. Builder. 
Cohen, Bennett, 100 Cedar street, Advertising agent. 
Colbert, Edward, 25 INIonmouth street, Bookkeeper. 
Colby, Charles E., 5 JMorgan street, No occupation. 
Cole, Abram L., 42 Everett avenue. Provision dealer. 
Cole, Daniel H., 22 Edmands street. Clerk. 
Coliton, Edward J., 87 Linwood street. Grocer. 
Collieson, Clarence E., 19 Park avenue. Leather dealer. 
Collins, John D., 22 Vine street, Mason. 
Colman, Charles W., 151 Central street. Architect. 
Comfort, James J., 5 Taunton street. Collector. 
Conant, George H., 8 Park avenue. No occupation. 
Conant, William C, 28 Central street, Mirror mfr. 
Concannon, John H., 50 Joy street. Produce dealer. 
Concannon, William, 131 Somerville avenue. Produce.' 
Condit, Fred H., 255 Medford street. Musician. 
Condit, Sears, 255 Medford street. Real estate dealer. 
Connelly, Joseph A., 11 Craigie terrace, Sub-foreman. 
Connelly, Lawrence C, 15 Charles street. Shipper. 
Coogan, John P., 23 Dane avenue. Expressman. 
Cook, Forrest D., 301 Highland avenue. Reporter. 
Copithorne, John, 81 School street, Carpenter. 
Corliss, Charles H., 36 Greenville street, Butter dealer. 
Covle, George R., 49 IMain street. Salesman. 
Craig, John W., 97 Washington street, Blacksmith. 
Creighton, Fred'k W., 328-A Highland ave., Bookkeeper. 
Crenner, Bartlett P., 61 Adams street, Leather dealer. 
Crocker, Lands S. J.. 19 Church street, Teamster. _ ^ 
Crosbv, Clifford F., 348 Summer st., Ventilatmg engnrr. 
Cross,' John A., 104 Pearl street. Bookkeeper. 
Crotty, William B., 466 Somerville avenue, Grocer. 
Cullen, Christopher J., 11 Joy-street place. Teamster. 
Cull in, Edwin, 222 Broadway, Grocer. 
Cullis, Edwin J., 201 Pearl street, Clerk. 
Cunningham, Thomas A., 60 Beacon street. Grocer. 
Curran, Reuben L., 62 Otis street. Foreman. 
Currier, Francis E., 15 Flint street, IMason. 
Currier, William M., 9 Lesley avenue, Bookkeeper. 



JURY LIST. 431 



dishing, Frederick E,, 20 Marshall street, Painter. 
Cutler, Frank E., 70 Pearl street, Painter, 
Cutter, George B., 4 Pleasant avenue. Musician. 



D 

Dadmun, Henry H., 48 Oxford street. Salesman. 
Daggett, William H., 133 Summer street, Bookkeeper. 
Dalton, Charles X., 99 Highland avenue. Manufacturer. 
Dalton, Fred M., 330-A Highland avenue, Marketman. 
Dalton, James H., 22 Powder House terrace. Grocer. 
Damon, Ellis H., 50 Hudson street. Bookkeeper. 
Danforth, George E., 149 Lowell street, Clerk. 
Daniels, Edward S., 50 Spring street, Piano tuner. 
D'Arcy, John ]., 2 Campbell park. Photographer. 
Dardis, John F., 8 Taunton street, Polisher. 
Davenport, Foster L., 301 Summer street. Conductor. 
Davenport, Howard H., 85 Munroe street, Asst. supt. 
Davis, Albert I., 35 Fairmount avenue, Bookkeeper. 
Davis, Albert M., 16 Fellsway West, Teamster. 
Davis, Claude E., 280 Broadway, Ice cream mfr. 
Davis, Edward A., 9 Holt avenue. Sail maker. 
Davis, Fred E., 85 Pearl street. Bookkeeper. 
Davis, George E., 46 Vinal avenue. Bookkeeper. 
Davis, George M., 20 Arthur street, Mason and builder. 
Dawes, Henry L., 8 Ashland street. Salesman, 
Dawson, Howard, 70 Albion street. Clerk. 
Day, Wallace W., 263 Highland avenue. Salesman. 
Delay, James, 48 Beacon street. Florist. 
Dennett, Alexander H., 20 Monmouth St., Paperhanger. 
Dennett, John M., 23 William street. Stable keeper, 
Dennett, William H., 20 Lovell street, Clerk. 
Densmore, Charles D., 44 Porter street. Merchant, 
Densmore, Edward D., 44 Porter street. Electrician. 
Denvir, William E., 197 Summer street, Shipper. 
Dever, Neil J., 16 Maple street. Teamster. 
DeWolf, Lewis E., 334 Highland avenue. Tailor. 
Dickie, James, 91 Bay State avenue. Electrician. 
Dimick, Charles W., 122 Line street. Manager. 
Dinsmore, Fred C, 8 Arthur street. Grain dealer. 
Ditchfield. Charles L., 22 Windom street, Casket trimmer. 
Doane, Nathaniel P., 19 Grand View ave.. Tow boat agt. 
Dodge, Edwin G., 21 Benedict street, Photographer. 
Dodge, William G., 26 Virginia street. Musician. 
Doe, Freeland A,, 187 Highland avenue. Cabinet maker, 
DollofT, Frank S., 62 Cross street. Baker. 
Donaldson, Charles A., 31 Ware street. Engineer. 
Donovan, James J., 63 Webster avenue. Glass maker. 
Dooling, David H., 306 Washington street, Painter. 
Dougherty, John E., 7 Oak street. Clerk. 
Douglas, Charles E. M., 20 Stone avenue. Salesman. 
Dow, Arthur F., 6Q Putnam street. Broker. 
Dowd, Thomas, 50 Fellsway West, Plasterer. 
Downer, Frank O., 181 Medford street, Laborer. 
Downey, Dennis J., 34 Merriam street. Laborer, 
Downing, John L., 30 Burnside avenue, Shipper, 
Drinkwater, Frank M,, 872 Broadway, Clerk. 
Driscoll, James F., 17 Cambria street. Machinist. 
Dunbar, John D., 3 Mystic street, Musician. 
Duncan, John, 2 Brastow avenue. Manufacturer. 
Dunham, George J., 54 Adams street. Bicycle dealer. 



482 AN-^AL REPORTS. 

Dunham, Marshall W., 54 Adams street, Bicycle dealer. 

Dunklee, Daniel D., 109 Sycamore street, Furnace dealer. 

Dustin, Harry N., 40 Church street. Clerk. 

Dwyer, Timothy C, 25 Greene street, Clerk. 

Dyer, Josiah T., 156 School street. Men's furnishings dlr. 

Dyson, Noble, 7 Belmont place. Stone cutter. 



K 

Eager, Oliver M., 39 Warwick street. Machinist. 
Eames, Henry H., 13 Chapel street. Machinist. 
Eastman, Ulysses G., 53 Pritchard avenue. Carpenter. 
Eaton, Clifford C, 86 School street, Musician. 
Edmands, John S., 28 Sycamore street. Architect. 
Edmond, George A., 10 Wesley street, Machinist. 
Edwards, Edward H., 10 James street. Chiropodist. 
Egerton, Charles S., 63 Boston street, Cigar dealer. 
Ekiof, Emil E., 15 Morrison avenue, Designer. 
Eldridge, Charles W., 57 Columbus avenue, Tinsmith. 
Eldridge, Frank, 47 Beach street, Salesman. 
Eldridge, Howard M., 16 Gilman street, Clerk. 
Elkins, John F., 142 Medford street. Contractor. 
Ellinwood, George H., 54 Beech street, Chemist. 
Elliott, George E., 103 Glenwood road, Grocer. 
Elliott, Waldo F., 177 Walnut street, Grocer. 
Ellis, William F., 4 Quincy street. Tailor. 
Elston, Abraham A., 25 Preston road, Contractor. 
Emerson, William J., 104 Broadway, Boot & Shoe dealer. 
Emery, Allen A., 71 Gilman street. Butter salesman. 
Emery, George W., 27 Albion street, Draughtsman. 
Estey, Clarence A., 30 Tufts street, Railroad clerk. 
Estey, Joseph Hatfield, 32 Thorndike street. Grocer. 
Esty, Austin S., 203 School street. Manager. 
Everton, Elphonso I., 34 Lake street, Cigar mfr. 



Fairbanks, Henry I., 152 Walnut street. Salesman. 
Fallon, John F., 7 Beach avenue, Junk dealer. 
Farnham, Charles E., 16 Grand View avenue, Clerk. 
Farrell, Patrick S., 55 Lowell street, Painter. 
Farwell, Ruleffe H., 92 Central street. Pressman. 
Fav, William H., 127 Josephine avenue, Upholstery buyer. 
Fellows, Charles H., 30 Banks street. Accountant. 
Fellows, John H., 12 Elston street, Accountant. 
Fenno, Edwin H., 45 Hancock street. Paymaster. 
Ferguson, Herbert J., 57 Lowell street, Porter. 
Fernald, George M. D., 207 Broadway, Electrician. 
Fifield, Fenno W., 33 Bonair street. Printer. 
Finch, Alfred C, 70 North street. Newspaper shipper. 
Finney, Nathaniel G., 632 Somerville avenue, Painter. 
Fisher, Alphonso, 7 Pearl-street place. Painter. 
Fisher, Edgar M., 14 Stickney avenue, Salesman. 
Fisk, Ellsworth, 44 Heath street, Clerk. 
Fitz, Charles E., 440 Broadway, Bookkeeper. 
Flao-g, Charles A., 24 Gibbens street. Conductor. 
Flaherty, Francis E., 261 Washington street, Undertaker. 
Flahertv, James P., 45 Everett avenue. Junk dealer. 
Flaherty William H., 261 Washington street, Contractor. 



JURY LIST. 433 



Fletcher, John E., 81 Wahiut street, Bookkeeper. 

Flynn, Dennis F., 67 Dane street, Upholsterer. 

Flynn, William P., 31 Linden street, Machine helper. 

Foote, Edward H., 138 Sycamore st., Pickle mfr. 

Ford, Charles S., 124-A Cross street, Canvasser. 

Foss, Lewis T., 21 Chandler street. Dentist. 

Foster, Elmer E., 10 Broadway place. Fireman. 

Foster, George W., 7 Evergreen avenue. Insurance agt. 

Foster, John B., 66 Irving street, Artist. 

Fox, Edward W., 123 College avenue, Jeweler. 

Fox, John, 28 Linden street. Laborer. 

Foy, John H., 350 Somerville avenue, Glass worker. 

Friend, Edward, 5 Cameron avenue. Painter. 

Frink, William A., 88 Holland street, Undertaker. 

Frost, George W., 38 Laurel street, Clerk. 

Frye, Charles H., 43 Sargent avenue. Machinist. 

Fudge, Edward J., 334 Somerville avenue. Undertaker. 

Fuller, Dana L., 150 Powder House boulevard. Beef sales. 

Fuller, Walter I., 37 Hancock street, Electrician, 

Fulton, David, 599^/4 Somerville avenue, Laborer. 



O 

Gaffney, William, 14 Kingman court, Tile mason. 
Garland, John A., 76 Porter street. Publisher. 
Garrett, Edwin E., 53 Hancock street, Clerk. 
Garrity, Martin, Jr., 416 Norfolk street. Plumber. 
Gary, Joseph E., 86 Irving street, Broker. 
Gavin, Edward J., 36 Berkeley street, Brass finisher. 
Gay, Frederick, 10-R Boston street. Expressman. 
Gay, Oswald R. M., 50 Pinckney street, Carpenter. 
Geary, John J., 41 Lake street. Salesman. 
Gear}^ Patrick J., 41 Lake street. Clerk. 
Gerrish, Charles E., 70 Boston street, Fruit dealer. 
Gerrish, Theodore, 7 Greene street, Broker. 
Getchell, Albert R., 51 Flint street. Waiter. 
Gibbs, J. Edwin, 118 Josephine avenue, Manager. 
Gifford, Herbert C, 54 Preston road, Real estate. 
Gilbert, Fred W., 101 School street, Shoe dealer, 
Gilchrist, Charles T., 52 Pearl street. Accountant. 
Giles, Charles E., 24 Webster street, Real estate dealer. 
Gill, Antonio P., 202-B Washington street, Barber. 
Gill, Frank A. W., 1 Dell street, P. O. clerk. 
Gill, Martin, 72 Bonair street. Teamster, 
Gill, William T., 1 Dell street, Undertaker, 
Gillette, Hiram A., 72 College avenue. Clerk. 
Gillis, Daniel B., 38 Benton road, Builder. 
Gilman, Charles E,, 49 Dickinson street, Grocer. 
Gilman, John W,, 85 College avenue. Manager, 
Glazebrook, John G,, 65 Wheatland street, Wood worker. 
Glidden, George A,, 11 Marshall street, Salesman. 
Glines, Arthur W., 142 Powder House boul., Salesman. 
Glynn, Thomas J., 18 Bow-street place. Laborer. 
Goddard, Edward A., Jr., 64 Wallace street, Clerk. 
Godev, Frederick C, 6 Eliot street. Roofer, 
Godfrey, Alexander M., 52 Berkeley street, Carpenter. 
Godfrey, Benjamin F., 20 Avon street, Cooper. 
Coding, Eugene F., 93 Newton street. Tinsmith. 
Goldsmith, Benjamin W., 7 Jasper street. No occupation. 
Goldthwaite, Jerome I., 82 Mt. Vernon street, Clerk. 



4o-J: AXXUAL REPORTS. 

Goodspeed, William H., 37 Rush street, Cafe proprietor. 
Gordon, Arthur C., 357 Somerville avenue, Painter. 
Graham, Robert C., 29 Greene street, No occupation. 
Graham, Samuel, 299 Broadway, Machinist. 
Graves, David B., 17 Rogers avenue, Clothing dealer. 
Graves, Elmer E., 19 Cottage avenue. Manager. 
Gray, Amasa, 71 Wallace street, Carpenter. 
Gray, Frank E., 21-A Cutter avenue, Salesman. 
Gray, Levi E., 4 Wellington avenue, Carpenter. 
Green, Bernard J., 2oO-A Somerville avenue. Mason. 
Greenough, John L., 19 Vernon street, Conductor. 
Greenwood, Frank W., 402 Medford St., Advt. solicitor. 
Griffin, Augustus P., 22 Richdale avenue. Salesman. 
Griffin, Daniel J., 18 Bow street. Bookkeeper. 
Griffin, Edward B., 32 Rush street. Shipper. 
Grover, George A., 10 Belmont place, Special officer. 
Grover, George B., 21 Electric ave.. Express messenger. 
Grover, Nelson H., 2G Oxford street. Advertising agent. 
Guild, Edgar A., 28 Webster avenue. Driver. 
Guild, Julius J., 325 Washington street, Salesman. 
Gurnham, Thomas, 36 Hancock street. Newsdealer. 



Hackett, James A., 20 Atherton street. Telegrapher. 
Hadley, Freddell O., 30 Conwell avenue, Wood worker, 
Hadley, Weaker M., 24 Hathorn street, Real estate. 
Hagen, Edward A., 210 Somerville avenue. Glass maker. 
Hale, C. Warner, 144 Highland avenue, Clerk. 
Haley, Fred, 41 Greenville street. Insurance agent. 
Hall, George G., 89 Cross street. Printer. 
Hall, William A., 9 Veazie street. Teamster. 
Hall, William Franklin, 103 Thurston street. Accountant. 
Flancock, Edward, 272 Highland avenue, Butter salesman. 
Harrington, Nathan B., 7 Bolton street. Clerk. 
Hartshorn, Frank S., 96 Glen street. Clerk. 
Hartwell, Walter C, 15 Kenwood street, Bookkeeper. 
Harvey, George W., 8 Chester avenue, Salesman. 
Haskell, Otis S. M., 279 Summer street. Confectioner. 
Hatch, Arthur E., 46 Browning road, INIanager. 
Hatch, Frederick A., 77 Jaques street. Laborer. 
Hathaway, Charles L., 26 Dover street. Pattern maker. 
Hathaway, Henry C, 12 Pembroke street. Painter. 
Hawkins, Alvin C, 48 Banks street, Foreman. 
Hayes, William T., 252 Medford street. Clerk. 
Hayward, John G., 5 Windom street. Insurance agent. 
Heacox, Dwight C., 45 Springfield street. Machinist. 
Henderson, John, Jr., 75 Harris street, Wood carver 
Hepburn, James, 226 Somerville avenue. Grocer. 
Hern, John H., 97 Prospect street. Wood worker. 
Hersey, Charles H., 7 Thurston street. Clerk. 
Hicks, Carlton, 8 Charnwood road. Clerk. 
Higgens, John, 38 Linwood street. Dry goods dealer. 
Higgins, Byron E., 20 Richdale avenue. Mason. 
Higgins, Solomon S., 158 Summer street, R. E. agent. 
Hill, Arthur B., 17 Norwood avenue. Musician. 
Flines, Alfred H., 9 Preston road, Mason. 
Hodge, Charles W., 26 Billingham street, Bookkeeper. 
Hodgkins, Edward S., 139 Orchard street. Clerk. 
Hodson, Albert O., 28 Pinckney street, Driver. 



JURY LIST. 435 



Hoit, Alonzo W., 275 Highland avenue, Produce dealer. 
Hoit, Edward P., 275 Highland avenue, Produce dealer. 
Holland, Charles J., 30 Aldrich street, Paperhanger. 
Holland, William L., 30 Aldrich street. Printer. 
Holmes, Charles A., 265 Beacon street, Vinegar mfr. 
Holmes, Frank H., 29-A Veazie street. Plumber. 
Holmes, Samuel, 49 Thurston street. Poultry salesman. 
Holt, Edward M., 32 Spring street. Machinist. 
Holt, Harry, 108 Porter street, Carpenter. 
Hook, George A., 30 Chandler street. Awning mfr. 
Plopkins, J. Wesley, 27 Summit avenue, Music salesman. 
Horton, Charles H,, 101 School street. Clerk. 
Horton, Charles P., 22 Everett avenue. Inspector. 
Horton, William A., 2 Billingham street. Artist. 
Hosmer, Cyrus, 297 Summer street. Clerk, 
Houdlette, Horace A., 33 Everett avenue. Salesman. 
Plouley, Patrick F., 65 Springfield street, Prov. dealer. 
Howard, Eugene P., 11 Hall avenue. Salesman. 
Howard, J. Walter, 330 Broadway, Florist. 
Howe, Frederick F., 40 Kidder avenue. Shipper. 
Howe, Henry E., 17 Sewall street, Shoe salesman. 
Hughes, John, Jr., 13 Morton street. Brass worker, 
Hulsman, Chester R., 44 Greenville street. Salesman, 
Hunnewell, William A., 23 Milton street, Coal dealer. 
Hunt, Cassius, 218 School street, Fish dealer. 
Hunt, Charles E., 28 Brook street. Clerk. 
Hunt, John T., 28 Brook street. Clerk. 
Hunt, Warren F., 236 Highland avenue. Clerk. 
Hunter, William H., 11 Sycamore street, Glass engraver. 
Hurley, James F., 229 Tremont street, Glass blower. 



Ingham, John S., 27-B Summer street. Clerk. 
Ireland, George H., 14 Stanford terrace, Blacksmith. 
Irish, Fred D., 3 Dartmouth street. Salesman. 
Ivans, Benjamin D., 69 Elm street, Machinist. 



Jackson, Edward F., 15 Osgood street, Driver. 

Jackson, George W., 8 Hall street. Brush maker. 

Jameson, Robert, 22 Bowdoin street, Billiard room kpr. 

Jansson, Augustus L., 102 Wallace street. Illustrator. 

Jaques, Otis A., 66 Boston street, Fruit dealer. 

Jaques, William J., 57 Webster street, Teamster. 

Jennings, George W., 60 Central street, Clerk, 

Jensen, James A,, 21 Meacham street. Freight conductor. 

Jerauld, Frank, 29 Aldrich street. Artist, ^ 

Johnson, Hartley M., 10 Belleview terrace. Expressman. 

Jonah, Leonard, 48 Raymond avenue. Carpenter. 

Jones, Benjamin F., 51 Cherry street. Artist. 

Jones, Charles E., 154 Pearl street, Carriage maker. 

Jones, C, Frank, 343-A Highland ave., Private secretary. 

Jones, Thomas F., 65 Springfield street. Starter. 

Jones, Walter C, 157 Willow avenue, Artist. 

Joslyn, Will C, 37 Banks street. Salesman, 

Joy, Alden B., 7 Craigie terrace, Carpenter. 

Junkins, Leander D., 5 Billingham st., Designer & invent. 



436- ANNUAL REPORTS. 



K 

Kane, William A., 34 Ash avenue, Tinsmith. 
Kauler, Charles E., 27 Oilman St., Undertaker's assistant. 
Kearney, Edward S., 20G Somerville ave.. Sawdust dealer. 
Kearney, John J., 6 Charlestown street. Clerk. 
Keay, Fred E., 153 College avenue. Editor. 
Keefe, Albert, 97 Elm street. Produce dealer. 
Keefe, William M., 4G Kingston street. Milk dealer. 
Keegan, Dominick F., 31 Belmont street, Printer. 
Keith, Simeon C, Jr., 20 Highland avenue, Bacteriologist. 
Kelley, Edward N., 17 Merriam street, Lather. 
Kelley, Isaac S., 22 Electric avenue. Cashier. 
Kelley, John J., 12 London street, Pedler. 
Kelley, William, 15 Leland street. Janitor. 
Kelley, William M., 17 Merriam street, Clerk. 
Kelly, John G., 33 Florence street, Machinist. 
Kelly, Michael H., 12 Parker street, Carpenter. 
Kendall, Henry A., 55 Oxford street, Bookkeeper. 
Kendall, Isaac B., 33S Broadway, Insurance agent. 
Kendall, John B., 25 Russell street, Milk "dealer. 
Kendall, Jonas B., Jr., 41 Russell street. Milk dealer. 
Kendall, Phillip S., 41 Russell street, Milk dealer. 
Kenneson, Charles A., 176 Walnut St., Stor. W. H. kpr. 
Kenney, James, 4 Concord avenue. Carpenter. 
Kidder, Llerbert A., 58 Walnut street. Cashier. 
Kiley, Patrick J., 15 Mystic street, Wlieelwright. 
Kimball, Charles L., 19-A Cross street, Foreman. 
Kimball, Edward P.., 7 Richdale avenue. Lawyer. 
Kimball, Harry G., 19-A Cross street. Brass finisher. 
Kimball, Harv^ey B., 13 Herbert street. Carpenter. 
Kingston, Joseph R., 39 Crocker street. Optician. 
Kinney, Edgar L., 92 Sycamore street. Bookkeeper. 
Kinsman, Joseph H., 20 Jaques street, Salesman. 
Kirby, Michael, 315 Washington street, Laborer. 
Knapp, Samuel, 3 Lester terrace, Salesman. 
Kneeland, Sylvanus R., 7 Loring street, Reflector dealer. 
Kneeland, William B., 9 Greene street, Freight solicitor. 
Knight, George R., 158 Broadway, Retired fireman. 
Knight, William E., 493-R Columbia street. Watchman. 
Knowles, Benjamin H., 15 Parker street. Hatter. 
Knowles, Thomas, 27 Tyler street. Hay dealer. 
Knowles, Zoeth R., 52 Putnam street, Printer. 
Knowlton, Edward B., 45 Josephine avenue. Pattern mkr. 
Knox, Waldo H., 19 Hancock street, Clerk. 
Koen, Philip, 19 Adrian street. Milkman. 



Lambert, Frank S., 10 Cross street, Painter. 
Land, Lawrence P., 60 Marshall street. Carpenter. 
Landers, Arthur C, 225 Summer street, Bookkeeper. 
Lane, Eugene H., 58 Berkeley street. Butter dealer. 
Laughton, William, 42 Banks street. Bookbinder. 
Lavey, John T., 7 Belmont street. Pork packer. 
Lawrence, Bernard W., 289 Highland ave.. Produce dlr. 
Lawrence, George B., 27 Spencer avenue. Slate dealer. 
Lawson, Peter P., 101 Summer street. Machinist. 
Leavitt, Edwin, 13 Pinckney street. Collector. 
Leavitt, Frank W., 468 Somerville avenue. Carriage mfr. 



JURY LIST. 437 



LeCount, Frederick R., 7 Dartmouth street, Clerk. 
Lennan, William M., 33 Burnside avenue, Clerk, 
Leonard, Eugene C, 86 Avon street, Tailor, 
Lewis, Dennis J., 14 Benedict street. Plumber, 
Libbey, Albion H., 8 Ames street, Salesman. 
Libbey, George W., 215 Pearl street, Bookkeeper. 
Libbey, Moulton C, 7 Jay street. Jeweler. 
Libby, George H., 21 Ashland street. Upholsterer. 
Liddell, William, 130 Broadway, Pattern maker. 
Lincoln, Andrew G., 3 Lincoln avenue. Ivory worker. 
Lind, John, 38 Clark street. Marble worker. 
Liston, William F., 123 Linwood street, Teamster. 
Litchfield, Hiram J., 18 Mystic avenue. Teamster. 
Litchfield, J. Warren, 181 Broadway, Milk dealer. 
Little, John K., 93 Hudson street, Accountant. 
Littlefield, Elisha, 65 Glen street. Carpenter. 
Littlefield, Samuel T., 321 Broadway, No occupation. 
Locke, Theodore H., 53 Central street. Clerk. 
Locke, Warren E., 94 College avenue, Real estate agent. 
Lomasney, John E., 7 Maple avenue, Clerk. 
Lombard, Richard J., 16 Evergreen avenue. Teamster. 
Lord, Benjamin F., 4 Pearl street, Provision dealer. 
Lord, Frank W., 4 Pearl street. Shoe salesman. 
Lord, George T., 23 Wheeler street. Milkman. 
Lorentzen, Henry, 101 Rogers avenue. Lock expert. 
Lounsbury, George H., 46 Houghton street. Clerk. 
Loveland, Charles M. N., 898 Broadway, Stenographer. 
Lovering, Edward P., 187 Medford street. Mason, 
Lovering, Everett L., 21 Bradley street. Musician. 
Lovering, John S., 27 Flint street. Teamster. 
Lowell, George E., 46 Gilman street. Livery stable kpr. 
Lowery, Donald J., 117 School street, Butler. 
Lowry, Michael F., 6 Quincy street. Clerk. 
Lund, John C, 13 Cutter street. Shipper. 
Lundergan, James W., 40 Dickinson street. Milkman. 
Lyman, Albert C, 19 Knapp street. Upholsterer. 
Lynch, John B., 9 Cedar avenue. Bookbinder. 
Lyons, Timothy J., 14 Chestnut street, Pedler. 



M 

MacCormack, John W., 89 Cross street, Signalman. 
Macdonald, John W., 23 Elm place, Salesman. 
Maddison, Arthur N., 7 Hall avenue, Stenographer. 
Magoon, William. S., 79 Perkins street, Signal repairer, 
Maguire, John F., 21 Fountain avenue. Photo engraver, 
Makant, Robert, 40 School street. Engraver, • 
Makechnie, Ernst H., 238 Elm street, Teacher of violin, 
Mangan, William J., 3 Hawkins street. Electrician. 
Mann, Alfred E., 75 Washington street. Undertaker, 
Manning, James F., 35-R Merriam street. Driver. 
IManning, John F., 152 Medford street, Teamster, 
Manning, John J., 29 Park street. Barber. 
Manning, Joseph J., 36 Oak street, Hackman. 
Marble, Augustus B., 92 Sycamore street. Sales agent, 
Marchant, Albert L., 92 Vine street. Barber. 
Marr, George S., 37 Dover street, Carpenter. 
Marsh, William H., 27 Cutter street, Teamster. 
Marshall, Edwin A., 41 Franklin avenue. Wood carver. 
Marshall, John A., 153-A Willow avenue. Salesman. 



438 ANNUAL EEPORTS. 

Marston, Joseph N., 18 Rush street, Carnage salesman. 
Martin, George J., 16 OHver street, Moulder. 
Martin, John P., 56-S Walnut street. Salesman. 
Martin, John W., 16 Montgomery avenue. Foreman. 
Martin, Lewis R., 34 Grant street. Teamster. 
Martinson, William H., 10 Boston street, Engineer. 
Mason, Seth, 32 Madison street. Advertising agent. 
Matthews, Frank J., 7 Maple avenue. Teamster. 
Maynard, Everett A., 22 Forster street. Sexton. 
Maynard, Fred L., 30 Ames street, Provision dealer. 
Mayo, Francis L., 17 Clark street, Bill poster. 
Mayo, Wallace J., 36 Putnam street, Electrician. 
McAllister, William H., 23 Wallace street, Brush maker. 
McAskill, Scyrene B., 6 Bow street, Candy dealer. 
McAvoy, Henry, 117 Somerville avenue. Stable keeper. 
McAvoy, Henry J., Jr., 40 Lake street, Stable keeper. 
McCarthy, James F., 24 Preston road. Charcoal dealer. 
McCarty, John J., 13 Knowlton street. Charcoal dealer. 
McConnell. William N., 51-B Church street, Real estate. 
McCrillis, Melvin C, 23 Dartmouth street, Beef dealer. 
McCullough, William, 54 Dane street. Produce. 
McDonald, Wm. M., 56 Cedar street. Provision dealer. 
McGann, Thomas F., 45 Putnam street, Brass founder. 
McGovern, Lawrence J., 9 Concord avenue. Machinist. 
McGrath, Charles T., 75 Harris street, Carriage painter. 
McKenna, David W., 7 Chestnut street, Pedler. 
McKenna, George F., 292 Lowell street. Undertaker. 
McMaster, George R., 12 Park street. Armorer. 
McNamara, Eugene T., 56 Columbus avenue, R. E. agent. 
McNamara, William E., 47 Dane street. Grocer. 
McQuade, Owen A., 6 Taunton street. Polisher. 
Medina, John, 27 College avenue, Merchant. 
Melvin, Charles F., 25 Farragut avenue, Salesman. 
Mentzer, Charles A., 47 Cherry street, Com. merchant. 
Merrifield, Fred H., 6 Abdell street, Salesman. 
Merriam, George S., 6 Essex street. Warehouseman. 
Merrill, Warren A., 14 Westminster street, Salesman. 
Merritt, William, 103 Pearl street, Railroad supt. 
Messer, Melvin J., 27 Franklin street. Manager. 
Miller, William S., 255 Medford street, Cashier. 
Miner, Robert A., 56 Chester street. No occupation. 
Mink, Frank L., Jr., 85 Elm street, No occupation. 
Molineaux, Michael R., 41 Thorndike street, Clerk. 
Mongan, Manasses P., 1 Garden court. Salesman. 
Monroe, Daniel N., 47-A Franklin street, Teamster. 
Moore, Frank M., 79 Boston street. Electrician. 
Moran, Henry W., 189 Pearl street. Iron moulder. 
Moran, William J., 78 Franklin street. Driver. 
Morang, Arthur C, 157 Lowell street, Clerk. 
Morgan, Francis W., 452 Medford street, Buyer. 
Morrill, Frank A., 5 Bradley street. Photographer. 
Morrill, Fred L., 18 Arlington street, Foreman. 
Morrill, Harry V., 25 Sargent avenue, Insurance agent. 
Morrison, Frank E., 23 Brook street, Provision dealer. 
Morrow, John J., 17 Perry street, Clerk. 
Morse, Henry H., 27 Hudson street, Merchant. 
Mullanev, Michael. 11-A Dane street, Laborer. 
Mullen, James, 24 Wyatt street, Laborer. 
Mulliken, John E. A., 39 Dartmouth street, Bookkeeper. 
Mulqueeney, Lot J., 420 Norfolk street, Laborer. 
Murdock, George F., 100 Flint street, Meat cutter. 



JUEY LIST. 439 



Murphy, John F., 65 Waterhoiise street, Enghieer. 
Murphy, Stephen R, 102 College avenue. Manager. 
Muzzy, Horace T., 31 Vinal avenue. Draftsman. 
Myott, WilHam C, 54 Richdale ave., Hoisting engineer. 



Nason, Charles C, 21 Wigglesworth street. Carpenter. 
Neal, Andrew C, 40 Raymond avenue. Gilder. 
Neely, D. Wesley, 15 Melvin street, Decorator. 
Nelson, Jesse L., 17 Robinson street. Carriage salesman. 
Newell, Franklin G., 28 Grant street, Machinist. 
Newman, Edward B., 24 Garrison avenue. Clerk. 
Newsom, James E., 74 Sycamore street. Produce dealer. 
Nichols, Walter W., 51 Webster street. Carpenter. 
Nickerson, Alfred P., 41-D Franklin street, Bookkeeper. 
Nickerson, Benjamin S., 37 Highland road. Broker. 
Nickerson, John F., 25 Flint street. No occupation. 
Nickerson, Urban H., 27 Hall avenue, Salesman. 
Niles, James H., 4 Fairlee street. Beef salesman. 
Noble, Archibald W., 39 Crocker street. Upholsterer. 
Northrop, Herbert N., 145 College avenue. Manufacturer. 
Norwood, Winfield S., 042 Broadway, Trimmer. 
Nourbourn, James W., 109 Walnut street, Asst. manager. 
Nowell, Joseph A., 19 Pinckney street. Engineer. 
Noyce, Benjamin C., 28 Glen street. Carpenter. 
Nute, Alfred D., 329 Highland ave., Shoe manufacturer. 
Nye, Thomas V. B., 51 Cedar street, Salesman. 
Nyman, Ernest D., 5 Wigglesworth street, Bag. master. 



O 

Oakes, Charles E., 36 Joy street. Railroad conductor. 
Oakes, Clifford L., 1108 Broadway, Barber. 
O'Brien, John J., 8 Durham street. Dry goods pedler. 
O'Brien, Timothy F., 4 Prospect place, Grocer. 
O'Brien, William, 15 Caldwell avenue. Expressman. 
O'Brien, William E., 70 Prospect street. Clerk. 
O'Connell, Henry J., 139 Lowell street. Cigar salesman. 
O'Connell, Michael, 35 Linwood street, Pedler. 
O'Day, William, 8 Palmer avenue, Machinist. 
Odiorne, William E., 15 Greenville street. Salesman. 
O'Donnell, Neil, 114 Cross street. Engineer. 
O'Donnell, Thomas H., 273 Washington St., Apothecary. 
O'Donohue, Daniel E., 100 Concord ave.. Music teacher. 
O'Leary, David T., 277 Washington street, Confectioner. 
O'Leary, Denis J., 410 Somerville avenue, Laborer. 
Olive, E. Percy, 27 Banks street. Photographer. 
O'Neil, John F., 135 Linwood street. Teamster. 
O'Neil, Michael A., 158 Lowell street, Stock broker. 
O'Neill, William J., 76 Bonair street, Woollens salesman. 
Orr, Thomas, 61 Glenwood road, Salesman. 
Osborn, Edgar W., 86 Porter street. Furniture dealer. 
Osgood, John M., 297-A Summer street. Electrician. 
O'Shaughnessy, Patrick, 76 Derby street. Milk dealer. 
Otterson, Alpheus, 15 Prospect HiM avenue. Clerk. 
Owen, John W., 20 Melvin street, Civil engineer. 



440 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Page, Daniel W., 21-R Webster avenue, Night watchman. 
Park, Arthur N., 20 Arlington street. Clerk. 
Parker, Arthur B., 17 Oilman street. Milk dealer. 
Parker, Leander W., 253 Willow avenue, Hackman. 
Parker, William H., 23 Hall avenue, Salesman. 
Parks, James J., 73 Grant street. Railroad clerk. 
Patch, Amos G., 35 Irving street, Produce dealer. 
Payette, Arthur F., 43 Oak street. Driver. 
Peake, Benjamin W., 62 Central street, Private secretary. 
Pearson, Albert L., 10 Dresden circle, Mechanical eng. 
Pease, Charles H., 189 Summer street. Mechanical eng. 
Pecheur, Augustus F., 7 Merriam street, Glass maker. 
Peck, Henry A., 2 Bigelow street. Printer. 
Peirce, Cyrus H., 75 Marshall street. No occupation. 
Perham, Edwin R., 22 Marshall street. Expressman. 
Perkins, George W., 79 Derby street, Machinist. 
Perkins, H. Willis, 373 Medford street. Clerk. 
Perry, Elwin L. R., Jr., 34 Richdale av., Brass goods mfr. 
Perry, William E., 69 Marshall street, Clerk. 
Philbrick, Charles S., 174 Morrison ave., R. E. agent. 
Phillips, Bernard C, 8 Charlestown street, Glass cutter. 
Pickthall, Richard E., 182 Central street, Superintendent. 
Pierce, Henry A., 14 Conwell street, Marketman. 
Pigon, Joseph H., 36 Wallace street, Clerk. 
Pillsbury, Edwin B., 1156 Broadway, Publisher. 
Plaisted, William D., 17 Franklin street. Clerk. 
Pond, George W., 91 Bay State avenue. Salesman. 
Potter, George B., 14 Crocker street, Produce salesman. 
Potter, Henry K., 5 Arthur street, Carriage mfr. 
Pratt, Charles H., 20 George street. Civil engineer. 
Pratt, Harry O., 20 Madison street, Clothing cutter. 
Preble, Frederick A., 55 Tennyson street, Bookkeeper. 
Prescott, Albion M., 59 Concord avenue, Teamster. 
Prichard, Charles E., 145 Walnut street. Salesman. 
Prichard, George W., 1 Bean court. Teamster. 
Prior, Charles W., 95 Summer street, Electrician. 
Puffer, Charles, 14 Dartmouth street, Produce dealer. 
Pugh, Samuel, 269 Summer street. Clerk. 
Pushee, Frank S., 43 Chester street, Salesman. 



e 

Quarrie, Joseph A., 62 Sycamore street, Carpenter. 
Quick, Augustus S., 51 Chester street. Salesman. 
Quilligan, Harry A., 451 Somerville avenue. Plumber. 
Quinlan, John P., 8 Buckingham street. Driver. 
Quinn, John A., 19 Rossmore street, Laborer. 



R 

Rafferty, Thomas, 30 Oak street. Plumber. 

Ralph, Alson C, 138 Lowell street. Electrician. 

Ramsdell, Charles H., 53 Tufts street, Real estate agent. 

Ramsdell, Solomon E., 390 Highland avenue. Mason. 

Rand, Fred C, 35 Banks street, Carpenter. 

Rand, George T., 336 Highland avenue, Undertaker. 

Rand, James B., 24 Austin street, Traveling salesman. 



JURY LIST. f ' 441 



Randlet, Irving N., 11 Jay street, Builder. 
Ray, Frank E., 16 Virginia street, Salesman. 
Raymond, Charles F., 20 Crocker street. Collector. 
Raymond, Marcus M., 37 Jaques street, No occupation. 
Raynes, Charles E., 49 Francesca avenue, Clerk. 
Reed, Clarence G., 30 Forest street. Plasterer. 
Reed, Cyrus A., 14 Farragut avenue. Upholsterer. 
Reeves, Frederic H., 15-A Herbert street. Clerk. 
Remick, George W., 16 Cutter street, Mason. 
Reynolds, James F., 12 Belmont place, Insurance agent. 
Rich, Isaac, 36 Walnut street. Civil engineer. 
Rich, Samuel B., 45 Francesca avenue. Fish dealer. 
Richards, Daniel, Jr., 14 Granite street. Clerk. 
Richards, Frederick L., 127 Summer street. Engineer. 
Richards, George A., 8-A Melvin st., Real estate agent. 
Richards, William P., 44 Day street. Architect. 
Richardson, George A., 20 Wesley street. Clerk. 
Richardson, Homer L., 11 Albion street, Compositor. 
Richardson, William C, 15 Franklin street. Clerk. 
Ricker, George E., 27 College avenue. Hotel keeper. 
Rideout, Henry N. W., 7 Howe street, Asst. paymaster. 
Ridler, Parker, 37 Ames street, Salesman. 
Riess, Frank, 49 Gorham street. Painter. 
Riley, Philip W., 122 Rogers avenue, Printer. 
Rinn, Daniel H., 17 Wesley park. Victualler. 
Rivers, Fred S., 31 Charnwood road. Electrician. 
Roberts, Oliver S., 15 Kidder avenue, Manager. 
Roberts, Samuel, 16-A Norwood ave., Insurance agent. 
Robinson, William F. S., 84 Pearl street, Artist. 
Robinson, Wm. H., 265 Broadway, Veterinary surgeon. 
Rogers, Bishop G., 34 Lake street. Bookkeeper. 
Rogers, Fred C, 413 Highland avenue. Cabinetmaker. 
Rogers, Frederick R., 3 Wesley park, Clerk. 
Rogers, John E., 9 Wigglesworth street, Electrician. 
Ronayne, John, 22V^ Tyler street. Laborer. 
Rouse, John P., 171 Washington street. Drug clerk. 
Rowe, Daniel, 299 Washington street, Editor. 
Rufer, John B., 134 Lowell street, Blacksmith. 
Runiney, Isaac E., 10 Benedict street, Machinist. 
Russell, Arthur J., 5 Beacon street. Printer. 
Russell, Edmond, 57 Dane street, Mason. 
Russell, Eugene L., 1196 Broadway, Provision dealer. 
Russell, George E., 20 Thorpe place. Meat cutter. 
Ryan, Martin J., 7 Garden court. Bookkeeper. 



Saben, Edward E., 110 Pearl street, Insurance agent. 

Sampson, Paul L., 22 Joseph street. Printer. 

Sanborn, William A., 472 Broadway, Brick manufacturer: 

Sanborn, William F., 17 Benedict street, News dealer. 

Sargent, Isaac C, 8 Parker street, Insurance agent. 

Savage, Peter J., 10 Dane avenue, Machinist. 

Savory, Harlie J., 81 Cross street. Railroad employee. 

Sawyer, Walter S., 16 Browning road, Real estate agent. 

Scanlon, Edward, 28 Marion street, Provision dealer. 

Schillinger, Edgar F., 5 Madison street. Clerk. 

Schofield, John E., 28 Willow avenue, Clerk. 

Schrafft, William E., 49 Belmont St., Candy manufacturer. 

Schwab, Ferdinand, 44 Highland road, Superintendent. 



442 ANNILVT. RIVrORTS. 

Scott, Albert W., 32 Spencer avenue, Baker. 
Sears, Eben, 25 Dartmouth street. Boiler inspector. 
Sewall, Charles B., 174 Walnut street. Collector. 
Sewall, William H., 140 Lowell street. Watchman. 
Seymour, Alfred A., 10 Brook street. Salesman. 
Shattuck, Benjamin F., 26 Warren avenue, Potato dealer. 
Shattuck, David A., 23 Brook street. Carpenter. 
Shaw, Charles E., 10 Easj:man road, Paperhanger. 
Shaw, Fred E., 18 Everett avenue. Bookkeeper. 
Shaw, Oscar M., 18 Everett avenue. Carpenter. 
Shaw, William H., 92 Central street, Assistant manager. 
Shaw, William T., 10 Fellsway West, Building supt. 
Sheeran, John J., 153-R Beacon street. Expressman. 
Shepley, Charles H., 45 Union square, Secretary. 
Sheridan, Arthur H., 22 Perry street, Salesman. 
Shiner, Alfred F., 158 Linwood street, Trader. 
Shorey, William P., 40 Columbus avenue. Clerk. 
Short, Oscar W., 8 Bowdoin street, Box manufacturer. 
Shriver, Chas. F., 209 Willow ave., Mgr. biscuit company. 
Sibley, Lincoln H., 18 Greene street. Driver. 
Simonds, Charles F., 86 Belmont street. Mechanic. 
Simpson, Merton P., 155 Willow avenue, Furniture sales. 
Singleton, Charles H., 17 Preston road. Jeweler. 
Skelton, Daniel J., 10 Burnside avenue. Carpenter. 
Skilton, Walter E., 7 Westminster street, Salesman. 
Smith, Albert A., 8 Howe street. No occupation. 
Smith, Albert E., 15^/^ Putnam street. Cooper. 
Smith, Edgar A., 45 Cedar street, Asst. superintendent. 
Smith, Edward P., 16 Powder House terrace, Clerk. 
Smith, Peter J., 117 Prospect street, Tea dealer. 
Smith, William, 13 Smith avenue. Cabinetmaker. 
Smith, William A., 12 Oilman terrace, Marketman. 
Snow, Herbert W., 199 Pearl street, Clerk. 
Snow, John C. H., 60 Mt. Vernon st.. Carpenter and bldr. 
Snow, Walter H., 42 Derby street, Ice cream dealer. 
Snow, William A., 17 Francesca avenue. Iron worker. 
Soares, Jose X. P., 39 Lowell street, Barber. 
Soule, Horace W., 22 Loring street, Draughtsman. 
Spaulding, Daniel B., 8 Hancock street, No occupation. 
Spaulding, James R., 57 Chandler street, Merchant. 
Spofiford, William S., 17 Florence street, Teamster. 
Sprague, Walter A., 50 Concord avenue, Telegrapher. 
Stackpole, John, 242 Broadway, Carpenter. 
Stacy, George W, 14 Madison street. Salesman. 
Staples, Mendall G., 42 Prospect street, Teamster. 
Starratt, John D., 1323 Broadway, Motorman. 
Steele, Danforth S., 8 Leslie place, Foreman. 
Stevens, Dudley L., 7 Francesca avenue, Salesman. 
Stevens, Elmer A., 103 Liberty avenue, Salesman. 
Stevens, Oliver A., 20 Putnam street, Engineer. 
Stevenson, James W., 20-R Cross street. Railroad clerk. 
Stodder, George F., 20 Stickney avenue. Fish dealer. 
Strout, Charles O., 17 Flint street, Mason. 
Stuart, Lewis R., 21 Delaware street, Dry goods dealer. 
Studley, Stillman S., 130 Sycamore street, Clerk. 
Sturtevant, Richard H., 31 Walnut street, Beef dealer. 
Sullivan, Cornelius, 12 Perry street. Brass moulder. 
Swain, Gideon W., 18 Bradley street, Provision salesman. 
Swain, Noah R., 17 Hathorn street, Gardener. 
Sweeney, John J., 216-A Somerville avenue, Grocer. 
Symonds, Irving F., 14 Greene street, Manager. 



JUEY LIST. 443 



Taapken, John R., 227 Holland street, Grocery clerk. 
Tattan, Michael H., 458 Somerville avenue, Grocer. 
Taylor, Alvin, 15 Jaqiies street, Plumber. 
Teague, Charles I., 5 Pearson road. Steam gauge maker. 
Temple, Wilbur C., 11 Laurel street, Agent. 
Thiery, William O., 198 Summer street. Salesman. 
Thomas, Joseph M., 23 Stickney avenue. Produce dealer. 
Thomas, Penrose F., 396 Medford street. Salesman. 
Thompson, Charles W., 27 Lake street, Clerk. 
Thompson, William H. J., 55 Concord avenue. Carpenter. 
Thompson, William J., 19 Shawmut street, Merchant. 
Thomson, Emerson, 10 Pinckney street. Clerk. 
Thurgood, Augustus, 42 Hudson St., Wall paper dealer. 
Thurston, Merton F., 67 Cedar street. Machinist. 
Tibbetts, Harris P., 33 Bradley street. Carpenter. 
Tilton, Elbridge A., 87 Temple street, Teamster. 
Timson, L. Edgar, 56 Mt. Vernon street, Clerk. 
Tincker, George R., 21 Oak street. Cook. 
Titus, Anson M., 10 Raymond avenue. Draughtsman. 
Titus, Franklin A., 34 Flint street, Real estate dealer. 
Tobin, John J., 373 Somerville avenue. Shoe dealer. 
Tomfohrde, Richard, 216 Highland ave., Restaurant kpr. 
Tompkins, Charles H., 2 Austin street. No occupation. 
Toothaker, Charles W., 67 Pearl street. Milk dealer. 
Toppan, Arthur W., 209 Highland ave., Gas engine dlr. 
Torrens, W^illiam L., 255 Broadway, Wood turner. 
Touchet, Victor L., 88 Line street. Teamster. 
Tracy, Albert A., 40 Hancock street, Manager. 
Trauschke, Henry H., 47 Florence street. Clerk. 
Treadwell, Frank W., 28 Brook street. Teamster. 
Tribble, Hiram, 50 Chandler street, Salesman. 
Tripp, William A., 57 Rush street. Teamster. 
Tucker, George M., 148 Oxford street. Advertising agent. 
Tucket, Charles R., 104 Bartlett street, Inspector. 
Turner, George E., 27 Tufts street, Teamster. 
Tuttle, Fred A., 17 Lesley avenue. Hardware salesman. 
Tuttle, Herbert L., 22 Everett avenue. Clothing dealer. 

U 

Ulm, Albert A., 59 Preston road. Printer. 

Upton, Henry J., 45 Florence street, Rubber worker. 

Upton, Samuel, 102 Glenwood road, Foreman. 



Valentine, Paul R., 2 Bolton street. Clerk. 
Van Buren, John D., 15^/^ Alston street. Carriage painter. 
Van Buskirk, Charles, 20 Prescott street, Wheelwright. 
Varney, Chas. A., 408 Highland ave.. Telephone insp'tr. 
Vickery, William J., 15 Quincy street. Paper box cutter. 
Vreeland, Edward B., 121 Central st.. Coal & wood dlr. 

Waitt, Ernest L., 61 Simpson avenue. Editor. 
Walker, George, 26 Wallace street, Salesman. 
Walker^ Granville A., 9 Loring street. Painter. 
Walker, Thomas G., 5 Dell street, Foreman. 



444 ' ANNUAL EEPORTS. ' 

Wanless, David, 21 Grove street, Salesman. 
Ward, Benjamin A., 22 Milton street, Tailor. 
Ward, Lawrence J., 14 Carlton street, Barber. 
Ware, Francis A., 54 Dartmouth street, Insurance agent. 
Warner, Charles S., 19 Chapel street. No occupation. 
Warren, Charles V., 17 Melvin street. Plumber. 
Waters, Harry G., 101 Orchard street, Clerk, 
Waters, Morgan, 11 Sanborn avenue. Assistant supt. 
Watson, Frank L., 21 Aldersey street. Paint dealer. 
Watson, Thomas J., 22 Fellsway West, Compositor. 
Watters, James, 41 Mystic avenue, Musician. 
Webber, Edward O., 77 Partridge avenue. Janitor. 
Webber, Herbert L., 70 Columbus avenue. Painter. 
Webber, Orrin H., 2 Wellington avenue. Carpenter. 
Weeks, Walter I., 36 Francesca avenue, Salesman. 
Welch, James T., 303 Highland avenue. Mason. 
Wemyss, George D., 29 Ames street. Wood worker. 
Wentworth, Frank H., 61 Dartmouth street. Salesman. 
Wentworth, Ransom D., 14 Hathorn st.. Stable keeper. 
Weston, Charles F., 23 Conwell street, Bookbinder. 
Weston, Howard H., 50 Jaques street. Restaurant keeper. 
Wheeler, Charles J., 32 Mead street, Painter, 
Wheeler, Frank F., 11 Mossland street. Painter, 
Wheeler, Homer C, 16 Kidder avenue. Receiving clerk. 
Whitcomb, Seth H,, 59 Summer street, Nurse, 
White, Christopher J., 86 Prospect street. Laborer, 
White, Frank H., 14 Montgomery avenue. Map mounter. 
White, George H,, 35 Meacham street, Machinist. 
White, J. Harvey, 411 Broadway, Agent. 
White, Maurice J., 52 Linwood street, Clerk. 
Whitney, James F., 40 Dartmouth street. Railroad acct. 
Whiton, Erastus, 12 Aldrich street. Clerk. 
Whiton, George F., 20 Otis street. Leather dealer. 
Wholey, James, 25 Oak street, Laborer. 
W^iggin, Walter S,, 74 Walnut street. Salesman. 
Wilkins, Samuel H., 19 Dover street. Beef dealer. 
Williams, Charles C, 10 Oakland avenue. Manager. 
Williams, Charles H,, 45 Union square, Carpenter, 
Williams, James, 166 Sycamore street. No occupation, 
Williams, James A., 212-A Somerville avenue. Carpenter. 
Williams, Paulinus F,, 99 Belmont street, Salesman, 
Williston, Belvin T., 3 Monmouth street, Mech. engineer. 
Willoughby, George T., Ill Central street. Builder. 
Wilson, John R., 60 Albion street. Carpenter. 
Wilson, Jonas W., 19 Houghton street. Teamster. 
Winsor, Martin C, 65 Cross street. Iron salesman. 
Winters, John M,, 275 Washington street, Electrician, 
Winters, William H., 275 Washington street. Teamster. 
Wood, Charles, 25 Columbus avenue. Locksmith. 
Wood, Herbert W., 30 Wallace street. Shell comb maker. 
Wood, James, 40 Tower street. Locksmith. 
Woodbury, Frederick A., 240-A School St., Shoe dealer. 
Woodman, L. Leroy, 8 Linden circle, Yardmaster, 
Woods, George H., 14-A Austin street, Agent, 
Wren, Maurice, 115 Cedar street. Salesman. 
Wright, Walter H,, 54 Vinal avenue. Manufacturer. 
Wyatt, Charles B., 10 Linden avenue, Machinist. 
Wyer, James C, 45 Pearl street. Engineer. 
Wyman, Charles B., 67 Thurston St., Restaurant keeper. 



JURY LIST. ' 445 



York, Ernest A., 10 Thorndike street, Driver. 
Young, David, 372 Highland avenue, Blacksmith. 
Young, Herbert L., 65 Franklin street. Clerk. 
Younker, Richard E., 9 Rossmore street, Wheelwright. 



CITY GOVERNriENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1905. 



Mayor. 

Leonard B. Chandler. 
45 Jaques street. 

Board of Aldermen. 

President — John J. Higgins. 
Vice-President — Sidney B. Keene. 

WARD ONE. 

Elmer H. Spaulding, Alderman-at-large .... 44 Tufts street. 

David B. Armstrong 25 Lincoln avenue. 

Thomas W. Sutherland 30 Tufts street. 

WARD TWO. 

William H. Smith, Alderman-at-large ... 10 Emerson street. 

William A. Flaherty 261 Washington street. 

Joseph P. Phillips 8 Charlestown street. 

WARD THREE. 

William F. Barker, Alderman-at-large .... 5 Putnam street. 

Leonard W. Cole 5 Homer square. 

William M. Armstrong .91 Summer street. 

WARD FOUR. 
Herbert L Laighton, Alderman-at-large .... 74 Flint street. 

Sidney B. Keene 56 Fellsway West. 

David C. Theall 250 Broadway. 

WARD FIVE. 

John J. Higgins, Alderman-at-large .... 10 Dartmouth street. 

George S. Lovejoy 167 Highland avenue. 

Jesse S. Newcomb 106 Glenwood road. 

WARD SIX. 

John F. Thompson, Alderman-at-large . . . 599^ Somerville avenue. 

Frank D. WiLKiNS 275 Willow avenue. 

Chester S. McFarland 21 Cedar street. 

WARD SEVEN. 

Walter A. Dow, Alderman-at large 15 Ware street. 

Zebedee E. Cliff 29 Powder House terrace. 

James Davis 85 Chandler street. 

City Clerk — George L Vincent ( died February 5, 1905). 
Frederic W^ Cook (elected February 9, 1905). 

Assistant City Clerk — Frederic W. Cook (elected City Clerk ). 

Howard E. Wemyss (appointed February 17, 1905). 

Regular meetings, second and fourth Thursday evenings of each month, at 
8 o'clock. 



CITY GOYFT^NMEXT AND OFFICERS FOR 1905. 447 

Standing Committees of tlie Board of Aldermen. 

Accounts. — Aldermen Wilkins, Sutherland and William M. Armstrong. 

Bonds. — Aldermen Phillips, Theall and David B. Armstrong. 

City Engineering. — Aldermen Smith, Sutherland and Davis. 

Claims. — The President, Aldermen William M. Armstrong and Davis. 

Elections. — Aldermen Phillips, David B. Armstrong and Theall. 

Electric Lines and Lights. — Aldermen Newcomb, Cole, Spaulding^ 
Dow and McFarland. 

Finance. — The President, Aldermen Barker, Flaherty, Dow, Spaulding, 
Keene and Wilkins. 

Fire Department. — Aldermen Cole, Lovejoy, Sutherland, Theall and 
Davis. 

Grade Crossings. — Aldermen Lovejoy, Keene, Phillips, William M. 
Armstrong and McFarland. 

Highways. — Aldermen Keene, Barker, Dow, Flaherty, David B. Arm- 
strong, Newcomb and Wilkins. 

Legislative Matters. — The President, Aldermen Keene and Cliff. 

Licenses. — Aldermen Dow, Wilkins and Newcomb. 

Ordinances and Rules. — Aldermen Barker, Laighton and McFarland. 

Police. — The President, Aldermen Smith and William M. Armstrong. 

Printing. — Aldermen Laighton, Cole and Lovejoy. 

Public Grounds. — Aldermen Newcomb, Laighton, Phillips, McFarland 
and Davis. 

Public Property. — Aldermen Lovejoy, Barker, Smith, Theall and Cliff. 

Sewers. — Aldermen Flaherty, Spaulding and Cliff. 

Special Building Permits. — Aldermen Smith, David B. Armstrong and 
Cliff. 

State Aid and Soldiers' Relief, — Aldermen Spaulding, Cole and 
Flaherty, 

Water. — Aldermen Laighton, Lovejoy and Sutherland. 

School Committee. 

Chairman. — Frederick A. P. Fiske. 
Vice-Chairffian. — George E. Whitaker, 

( Term, two years, except members ex-officiis. ) 

Leonard B. Chandler, Mayor (ex-officio), 45 Jaques street. 
John J. Higgins, Pres. Board of Aldermen (ex-officio), 10 Dartmouth street. 

ward one. 

Henry F. Curtis ( elected 1903 ), 145 Perkins street. 

William W. Kennard (elected 1904 ), 15 Hathorn street. 

ward two. 

Daniel H. Bradley (elected 1903), 19 Concord avenue. 
John H. O'Neil ( elected 1904 ), 44 Oak street. 

WARD three. 

George E. Whitaker (elected 1903), 75 Walnut street. 
Wilbur S. Clarke ( elected 1904 ), 40 Vinal avenue. 



448 ANNUAL KEPOPtTS. ' 

WARD FOUR. 

George W. W. Whiting (elected 1903 ), 282 Broadway. 
William P. Jones ( elected 1904), 13-a Maple avenue. 

WARD FIVE. 

QdiNCY E. DiCKERMAN ( elected 1903 ), 85 Central street. 
J. Walter Sanborn ( elected 1904 ), 183 Central street. 

WARD SIX. 

Frederick A. P. Fiske (elected 1903), 44 Cherry street. 
Charles H. Hood (elected 1904), 2 Benton road. 

WARD SEVEN. 

George C. Mahoney (elected 1903), 415 Highland avenue. 
Henrietta B. H. Attwood ( elected 1904), 18 Plerbert street. 

Superintendent and Secretary. — Gordon A. SoUTHWORTH. 

Office, City Hall Annex. 
Hours: 8 a. m. to 12 M., and 1..S0 to 5 p. m., except Saturdays ; 

Saturdays, 8 to 10 A. M. 

Regular meetings, last Monday evening of each month, except July and 
Augus% when none are held, and December, when meeting is on last Friday. 

Assessors. 

( Term, three years. ) 

Albert B. Fales, Chairman ( term expires 1907 ). 

Benjamin F. Thompson (term expires 1908). 

Nathan H. Reed ( term expires 1906). 

Harry A. True (term expires l(t06). 

Jesse J. Underhill ( died August 29, 1905 ). 

George E. Elliott (appointed September 28, 1905 ; term expires 1908). 

ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

( Term, one year. ) 
Fred B. Cla.pp. George E. Elliott. 

John J. Sheeran. Walter F. Turner. 

Office open : 8 A. m. to 4 P. m.; Saturdays, 8 a. m. to 12 M. 

Board of Health. 

(Term, two members, two years; one member, one year. ) 

Allen F. Carpenter, Chairman ( term expires 1906 ). 

Edmund S. Sparrow (term expires 1907). 

Wesley T. Lee, M. D. ( term expires 1906). 

Clerk. — William P. Mitchell. 

Agent. — Caleb A. Page. 

Superintendent Collection of Ashes and Offal. — Edgar T. Mayhew. 

Inspector of Animals and Provisions. — Charles M. Berry. 

Inspector of Milk and Vinegar. — JuLius E. Richardson. 

Bacteriologist. — Frank L. Morse, M. D. 

Office open : 8 A. m. to 4 p. m. ; Saturdays, 8 a. m. to 12 m. 



CITY COVERKMENT ANT) OFFICEKS FO"R 1905. 449 

Overseers of the Poor. 

Office, City Hall Annex. 

( Term, three years. ) 

Edward B. West, Chairman ( term expires 1906). 
Albert W. Edmands ( term expires 1908 ). 
Herbert E. Merrill ( term expires 1907 ). 
Agent. — Charles C. P'olsom. 
Secretary. — Cora F. Lewis. 

Office open : 8 A. M. to 4 P. m. ; Saturdays, 8 A. M. to 12 M. 

Registrars of Voters. 

( Term, three years. ) 

Charles P. Lincoln, Chairman (term expires 1907). 

Charles E. Parks (term expires 1908). 

Levi F. S. Davis (term expires 1906). 

George L Vincent, City Clerk (died February 5, 1905). 

Frederic W. Cook, City Clerk ( elected February 9, 1905 ; term expires 1908). 

Public Library Trustees. 

(Term, three years.) 

Charles A. West, Chairman ( term expires 1907). 

John B. Viall ( term expires 19l'8). 

, Edward C. Booth (term expires 1907). 

George W. Perkins ( term expires 1907). 

J. Frank Wellington (term expires 1908). 

Irving G. Hall ( term expires 1906 ). 

Howard D. Moore ( term expires 1906 ). 

Frederick W. Parker ( term expires 1900 j. 

Charles S. Soule (term expires 1908 ). 
Librarian and Secretary. — Sam Walter Foss. 

Library open 9 a. m. to 9 p. m., and the reading room Sundays 2 to 6 p. m. 

City Clerk. 

George I. Vincent ( died February 5, 1905 ). 

Frederic W. Cook ( elected February 9, 1905 ). 

Assistant City Clerk. — Frederic W. Cook (elected City Clerk), 

Howard E. Wemyss (appointed February 17, 1905). 

Office open: 8 A. M. to 4 p. m. ; Saturdays, 8 A. m. to 12 m. 

City Treasurer and Collector of Taxes. 

James F. Beard. 
Office open: 8 A. M. to 2 P.M.; Saturdays, 8 A. M. to 12 M. 

City Messenger. 

Jairus Mann. 

Mayor's Secretary. 

Fred E. Warren. 



450 ANNUAL REPOiRTB. 

City Solicitor. 

Frank W. Kaan, 

50 State street, Boston. 

City Auditor. 

Charles S. Robertson. 

City Engineer, 

Ernest W. Bailey. 
Office open : 8 a. m. to 4 p. m, ; Saturdays, 8 a. m. to 12 m. 

Clerk of Committees and Departments. 

William P. Mitchell. 
Office open : 8 A. M. to 4 r. M ; Saturdays, 8 a. m to 12 M. 

Commissioner of Streets. 

Asa B. Prichard. 
Office hour : 9 a. m. 

Commissioner of Public Buildings and Inspector of Buildings. 

Walter T. Littlefield. 
Office open : 8 a. m. to 4 p. m., Saturdays, 8 a. m. to 12 M. 

Inspector of Plumbing. 

Duncan C. Greene. 
Office hour : 8 to 9 A. M. 

Commissioner of Electric Lines and Lights. 

Edward Backus. 
Office hour : 8.30 to 9.30 A. m. 

Water Commissioner. 

Frank E. Merrill. 
Office open : 8 A. M. to 4 p. m. ; Saturdays, 8 a. m. to 12 M. 

Chief of Police. 

Melville C. Parkhurst. 
Office, Police Building, Bow street. 

Chief Engineer of the Fire Department. 

James R. Hopkins. 
Office, Central Fire Station, 261 Medford street. 



CITY GOVERNMimT AND OFFTCEKS FOR 1905. 451 

City Physician. 

Alvah B. Dearborn, M. D., 
, 3-4 Bow street. 

Inspector of Milk and Vinegar. 

Julius E. Richardson, 
310 Broadway. 

Inspector of Trees. 

Charles I. Bucknam ( appointed July 27, 1905 ). 

Inspector of Animals and Provisions. 

Charles M. Berry, 
60 Prescott street. 

Inspector of Petroleum. 

James R. Hopkins. 
Office, Central Fire Station, 2(31 Medford street. 

Sealer of Weights and Measures. 

John H. Dusseault, 
Office, City Hall Annex. 

Office open: November 1 to March 31, inclusive, 9 a. m. to 12 M. ; April 1 to 
October 31, inclusive, 9 a. m. to 12 m., Fridays and Saturdays only. 

Fence Viewers. 

Lambert M. Maynard, 
90 Highland avenue. 

Charles M. Berry, 
60 Prescott street. 

Burial Agent. 

under revised laws, chapter 79, section 20. 

John H. Dusseault, 
42 Sargent avenue. 

Constables. 

George H. Carleton. P^ranklin W. Hopkins. 

Eugene A. Carter. Dennis Kelley. 

Winslow W. Coffin. Jairus Mann. 

Thomas Damery. Charles B. Palmer. 

John M. Driscoll. Melville C. Parkhurst. 

Charlfs L. Ellis. Robert R. Perry. 

Charles C. Folsom. Malcolm E. Sturtevant. 

Patrick J. Gakvin. George M. Winters. 

William D. Hayden. Charles E. Woodman. 

Measurers of Wood and Bark. 

William B. Holmes, 
317 Broadway. 

Oscar A. Dykens, 
34 Chestnut street. 



452 



AXNTJAL REPORTS. 



John Craig. 



Measurers of Grain. 

GusTAv A. Young. 



Public Weigher in Charge of City Scales at City Ledge. 

Edward L. Grant. 



Weighers of Coal. 



Edgar H. Barker. 
Jefferson D. Cameron. 
Alfred B. Clark. 
Patrick Coffey. 
Harry A. Crawford. 
Howard H. Davenport. 
Fred C. Dinsmore. 
Charles F. Doherty. 
Thomas A. Dunlap. 
Amherst F. Durkee. 
Oscar A. Dykens. 
Joel J. Fisher. 
Philip F. Fitzpatrick. 
Frank H. Freeman. 
Charles W. Furlong. 
Charles T. Garland. 
William E. Gerrish. 
John H. Gray. 
Stephen M. G. Hale. 
Charles B. Harris. 
James Hayden. 
Agnes Hellen. 
Ida C. Houlihan. 
Grace Abbie Hurd. 
Fred M. Hutchinson. 
Charles H. Jewell. 



Oliver S. Bryant. 
Jesse W. Chase. 
George M. Chisholm. 
William J Dooner. 
Alfred G. Dymond. 
Frederick A. Geiling. 
Chester G. Hall. 
John J. Horrigan. 



Thomas C. Lamb. 
Herbert B. Magown. 
Charles W. Marquedant. 
John A. Marsh. 
George F. McAllister. 
John McDonald. 
John W. McIver. 
Henry T. McLean. 
Frank T. McMahon. 
James C. McMahon. 
John J. McMahon. 
George H. M.Oore. 
Stephen M. Moran. 
Charles W. Porter. 
Paul N. Raymond. 
Lottie L. Rice. 
Charles E. Rockwell. 
Abram Simon. 
William C. Stickle. 
Frank A. Telle. 
William J. Thompson. 
Elizabeth M. L. Wallace. 
Thomas Walsh. 
Charles H. Ward. 
David C. Woodill. 
LuciAN L. Woodman. 



Weighers of Beef. 

Wendall B. Horton. 
Reuben W. Mead. 
John T. Quinn. 
Herbert D. Reed. 
Willis B. Sargent. 
Walter Savage. 
Robert E. Smith. 
Walter M. Tower. 
Edward M. Wheeler. 



INDEX. 



Bacteriologist, Report of . . . 
City Clerk. Report of . 

Receipts 

Payments ...... 

Licenses and Permits 

Gas and Pole Locations . 

Births 

Marriages 

Deaths 

Assessed Polls and Registered Voters 

Elections 

Liquor L.icense Question 

George L Vincent .... 
City Engineer, Report of . . . 

Engineering Department 

Expenses, Engineering Department 

T)flice Records and Value of Instrument 

General Work ..... 

Streets Accepted in 1905 . 

Length of Public Streets in Each Ward 

]\:liles of Edgestone, Brick Sidewalk, and Gravel Sidewalk 
in Each Ward .... 

Table of Street Construction . 

Bridges and Grade Crossings 

Perambulation of City Boundary Lines 

Sewer Department .... 

Sewers Construction, Expenses, 1905 

Sewers Constructed 

Summary of Work .... 

INIetropolitan Sewer Connections . 

New Work, Recommendations 

Alewife Brook ..... 

Sewers Maintenance, Expenses, 1905 

Public Grounds Department . 

Public Grounds Maintenance, Expense 

Tabic of Streets .... 
City Government and Officers for 1905 
City Physician, Report of . . . 
City Solicitor, Report of . . . 
City Treasurer and Collector of Taxes, Rep 

Public Property .... 

Funded Debt ..... 

Resources ..... 

Appropriations from Funded Debt and from Incom 

Cash ....... 

Assets and Liabilities 

Balance Sheet 

Statement of Accounts . 

Balances ...... 

Approval of Treasurer's Report . 

Commissioner of Electric Lines and I-ights (see Electric Lines 

and Lights, Commissioner) 



ort 



of 



PAGE 

274 
412 
412 
413 
413 
414 
414 
415 
415 

417, 418 
419 
424 
425 
289 
2 9 

289, 290 
290 
291 
293 
293 

294 

294 

295, 290 

29G 

297 

297 

298, 2!)9 

299 

299 

300 

300 

301 

303 

304 

307 

44(; 

2^8 

499 

1(5 

10,21 

10, 2() 

18 

19 

19 

19 

20 

21 

136 

139 

353 



454 



INDEX. 



Commissioner of Fiiblic Buildings (see Public Buildings, Com 
missioner) ....... 

Commissioner of Streets (see Street Commissioner' 
Commissioner of Water (see Water Commissioner) 
Electric Lines and Lights,, Commissioner, Report o 

Electrical Department 

Fire Alarm 

Police Signal .... 

Underground Wires 

Street I>ights .... 

Financial Statement 
Fire Department, Chief of. Report of 

Fires ..... 

Manual Force .... 

Equipment .... 

Recommendations 

Cost of Fire Department Maintenance 

Causes of Bell Alarms 

Fire Department Account 

Roster of Department 
Health, Board of, Report of . 

Organization, Oflice 

Nuisances 

Permits 

Pedlers 

Ashes 

House Ofifal . 

Stables 

Board of Infants 

Deaths and Death Rates 

Diseases Dangerous to the Public Fie 



alth 
261, 2( 

Disinfection 

Contagious Hospital 

Bacteriological De])artment 

Specimens and Anti -toxin 

Districts .... 

Undertakers 

Examiners of Plumbers . 

Tuberculosis 

Tables of Diseases . 

Financial Statement 

Bacteriologist, Report of 

Inspector of Animals and Provisions 

Inspector of JNIilk and Vinegar 
Inspector of Buildings (see Public Building 
Inspector of Animals and Provisions, Report of 
Inspector of Milk and Vin